macOS Music and TV apps exposed – lets hope WWDC is more

first_imgFor months it has been rumoured Apple is plotting to split the iTunes Mac app into Music and TV apps. Now we’ve got our first – albeit very underwhelming look – at how they may appear.Just 24 hours after it published screenshots claiming to show the new iOS 13 dark mode, 9to5Mac has doubled down with screenshots allegedly taken from the next version of macOS, likely to be dubbed 10.15.The screenshots offer a glimpse at the dedicated media apps, purportedly (and given the site’s record we have no reason to doubt it) shared by people involved in the development of the app.Both of the apps, which are not populated by any content and thus makes them look rather boring, appear to follow iTunes’ lead in many respects. Both apps retain a similar interface with a sidebar for the main segments in the Music and TV apps, albeit a little more colourful than we’ve seen in iTunes in recent years.Related: Best MacBook Air alternativesImage credit: 9to5MacThe TV app also features tabs for Watch Now, Movies, TV Shows, Kids and Library judging by the screenshots released today. The launch of the TV app is likely to open the door for the new Apple TV+ service and the Channels feature to arrive on the desktop, alongside iOS and tvOS.Apple is highly likely to launch the new version of macOS during the WWDC keynote on Monday. As well as standalone TV and Music apps, Apple is likely to port a number of other iOS apps onto the desktop operation system.After Stocks, News and Voice Memos were moved across with macOS 10.14 Mojave, Apple plans to let developers port iPad apps over to the Mac. We’re also expecting the company to enable iPad users to use their tablet as a secondary display, while Siri Shortcuts are also likely to make their way to the Mac.We’ll have full coverage of WWDC when it commences on Monday at 6pm UK time. Join us, won’t you? Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Shenmue 3 receives another delay but its still coming later this year

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. ——————————————————————————————————–Grab these great Prime Day savingsSave £40 on the Kindle PaperwhiteSave £171 on the Ultimate Ears Megablast speaker Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.center_img For years, fans all over the world were convinced that Shenmue 3 was nothing but a distant dream, but now, it’s almost a reality. The first two games remain cult classics, enhanced with a welcome remaster in recent months that improved graphics and added plentiful new features.Unfortunately, fans will now have to wait a little longer to experience Yu Suzuki’s later project, since Shenmue 3 has been delayed a few months beyond its original release date. However, that doesn’t make us any less excited for what’s to come.Trusted Reviews has compiled everything you need to know about Shenmue 3 including all the latest news, gameplay, release date, trailers and more.Shenmue 3 release date – when is it coming out?Originally planned to launch in August 2019, Shenmue 3 has been delayed with a new release date of November 19th.This puts it in the middle of a busy release schedule, but given the anticipation behind it, we can see Shenmue 3 standing out.Shenmue 3 system requirementsDespite having not announced a release date yet, YS Net has revealed the minimum system requirements for Shenmue 3 on PC. You can find he relatively modest specs below:OS: Windows 7×64, Windows 8×64, Windows 10×64 (64-bit OS Required)Processor: Intel Core i5-4460 (3.40 GHz) or better; Quad-core or betterMemory: 4 GB RAMGraphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti or better (DirectX 11 card & VRAM 2GB Required)DirectX: Version 11Network: Broadband internet connectionStorage: 100 GB available spaceSoundcard: DirectX 9.0c compatible sound cardOf course, these are “subject to change” due to Shenmue 3 still being in development. This is good news, though, as players with mid-range hardware won’t have a problem pushing Shenmue 3 to its limits.What is Shenmue 3?Shenmue 3 is an open world action-adventure title developed by Neilo and Ys Net. This third and potentially final installment will conclude Ryo Hazuki’s tale of redemption as he seeks to avenge his father’s death. We’re hoping for a vast open-world to explore with all the charm and innovation previous games dealt in spades. No pressure, then.Related: Upcoming PS4 GamesThe 2013 Kickstarter campaign managed to raise a grand total of $6,333,295, with Sony providing marketing, publishing support and further funding. Whether Yu Suzuki and friends can pull off a fresh and engrossing adventure with such a budget remains to be seen, but we cannot wait to see them try. After all, the original Shenmue was the most expensive game ever produced at the time at around $70 million.Shenmue 3 story – What’s it about?Shenmue 3 seeks to conclude a story that began way back in December 1999 on the Sega Dreamcast, so there might be a bit of catching up to do.Following the events of Shenmue 2, the year is 1987 and our hero Ryo Hazuki has journeyed from the bustling suburbs of Yokosuka to the mountains of Guilin, China in search of his father’s killer. Here he encounters Ling Shenhua, a beautiful, mysterious girl who previously appeared in his dreams. She tells Ryo that they are united by fate, and he must seek out his destiny and defeat Lan Di, his father’s murderer.Shenmue 3 begins in Guilin’s Bailu Village, a rural riverside town filled with shops, minigames and characters to encounter. The true drive of Shenmue 3’s plot beyond the obvious tale of redemption remains a mystery, but will no doubt surprise passionate fans.Related: Best PC GamesShenmue 3 gameplay – How does it play?We’ve yet to see any proper gameplay of Shenmue’s third outing, but series creator Yu Suzuki has provided us with plenty of tantalising details since the dream project’s surprise announcement. Ryo’s next adventure will once again be open-world, dropping him in the riverside town of Bailu. This humble little abode is packed with distinctive shops, temples and minigames for the player to enjoy, many of which may reward you with special items and bonuses.Ryo will be able to make phone calls to his friends back in Japan, building upon relationships founded in past games through optional conversations. It is unclear whether this will impact Ryo’s stats, but it’d be a nice bonus for venturing off the beaten path. As far as combat is concerned, we’ve only seen a few small glimpses through pre-rendered screenshots and small minute development diaries.Shenmue 3 trailers – How does it look?The finished product is still a while off, but now we have our first teaser trailer showcasing gameplay, cutscenes and more:Shenmue 3 wishlist – What we’d like to seeBring us back up to speedShenmue has a long and complicated history, with its story now 17 years old. It’s natural to assume that some players will be coming to the franchise for the very first time. We’d love to see some playable flashbacks implemented into the experience, giving us a taster of previous games through the perspective of modern mechanics. Either that or the ability to watch key cutscenes from older games via an in-game viewer would be excellent. The Yakuza franchise allows players to “reminisce” the plot of each game, meaning it’s always easy to jump in at any point.Branching narrativeShenmue is a series famed for its dramatic, ground-breaking narrative, evolving our perception of videogame storytelling back in 1999. Imagine if Shenmue 3 made similar innovations, having player choice influence not only the open world, but the core story of Ryo Hazuki’s long sought after redemption. The addition of a multi-faceted dialogue tree would be welcome, giving us ample opportunity to shape our own interpretation of Ryo by spitting hot fire or lovely compliments. It’s kinda like Mass Effect without aliens and in 1980’s China.Pet Simulator!Remember the stray cat in the original Shenmue? Adorable wasn’t it? Shenmue 3 should give Ryo the option to adopt a pet of his own, having it follow him throughout town or wait for him back at home. It doesn’t have to be a cat, either. It could be a dog, parrot or even a lizard. Caring for a pet would add an extra layer of amusing depth to the open-world, providing you can find objects and gifts for your resident companion lying about. Just make sure he can’t own a tarantula or something.What would you like to see from Shenmue 3? Let us know in the comments below! Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

Canadas economy gains 55900 jobs beating expectations

first_img Join the conversation → ← Previous Next → Canada’s economy gains 55,900 jobs, beating expectations Best two-month start to a year since 1981 Share this storyCanada’s economy gains 55,900 jobs, beating expectations Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Comment Facebook Email March 8, 20198:35 AM ESTLast UpdatedMarch 8, 20198:44 AM EST Filed under News Economy 15 Comments The Canadian Press advertisementcenter_img Recommended For YouCargill shuts animal-feed mills in China as fatal hog disease spreadsU.S. markets regulator joins calls for speedy transition away from LiborCrowds converge as Asian supermarket H-Mart opens in south EdmontonForeign exchange ratesC$ posts 9-month high as investors focus on rate divergence Featured Stories More The latest jobs report by Statistics Canada says the unemployment rate held firm last month at 5.8 per cent as more people hunted for work.National Post Reddit OTTAWA — The labour market generated a second straight month of strong job gains in February with the creation of 55,900 net new positions, all of which were full time.Analysts in a Reuters poll had forecast February job numbers to be flat.The latest jobs report by Statistics Canada says the unemployment rate held firm last month at 5.8 per cent as more people hunted for work.The February surge follows a gain of 66,800 positions in January to give Canada its strongest two-month stretch of job creation since the spring of 2012 — and its best two-month start to a year since 1981.The report says the addition last month of 67,400 full-time jobs more than offset a loss of 11,600 part-time positions.Related Stories:Canada’s jobs market stalls after strong start to year The agency says the number of more desirable employee positions in the private sector climbed by 31,800 last month, while public sector jobs rose 8,900. The number of self-employed increased by 15,100.Year-over-year average hourly wage growth in February for permanent employees was 2.3 per cent, which was up from a reading of 1.8 per cent for January.The report says the services sector saw a gain of 46,200 positions, while goods-producing industries added 9,500 new jobs.With file from Reuters Sponsored By: Twitter What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generationlast_img read more

Jaguar IPace eTrophy Season One Calendar Revealed

The first eTrophy campaign will begin at the Formula E season-opener in Riyadh on 15 December 2018, before skipping the next two FE rounds.The eTrophy will resume in Mexico City in February 2019 and will support FE for all of its remaining season five events, except the Swiss round, which is getting a new location after the Zurich event was canceled.Exclusive: Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy Test Drive Review“Seeing Jaguar I-PACE eTrophy racecars line up on the grid in December will be a proud and historic moment for Jaguar, and spectators can expect plenty of action from the races,” said eTrophy championship manager Marion Barnaby.“As we travel to some of the world’s most exciting cities we’ll be bringing a new kind of electric street racing to the public and inspiring the next generation of electric vehicle owners.”The eTrophy calendar is still subject to the approval from the FIA’s World Motor Sport Council and the necessary track homologation processes.The championship’s event format will consist of one race of 25 minutes plus one lap at each location, which will follow the dedicated practice and qualifying sessions.It is not yet known how these sessions will be arranged around FE’s single-day event format.The prize fund for the eTrophy series exceeds £500,000 per season and Jaguar is planning to field a VIP entrant at every round.The first official pre-season test for the opening eTrophy championship will take place at Silverstone later in September.A Jaguar statement announced that “teams will travel to the iconic Silverstone circuit to take delivery of their Jaguar I-PACE eTrophy racecars”.The Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing team that will field Katherine Legge and Bryan Sellers remains the only squad to commit to entering the first eTrophy season at this stage.Check out the calendar below:Full press release:DEBUT JAGUAR I-PACE eTROPHY CALENDAR ANNOUNCED· First race confirmed to take place on 15 December 2018 in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia· Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY will take place at 10 ABB FIA Formula E rounds from the 2018-19 season onwards· First official introduction test set to take place 24 – 27 September at Silverstone, UK· Sabelt confirmed as technical partnerCoventry, UK, 12 September 2018: Jaguar Racing has unveiled the full race calendar for the inaugural Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY Championship. Up to twenty identical Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY racecars will line up on the grid on Saturday 15 December in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, for the first round of the new global electric production car racing series.The Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY race will take place before the main ABB FIA Formula E race on the same city circuits, throughout the 2018-19 season and beyond. The series, a world first, offers teams the chance to showcase driving talent and electric performance in some of the world’s most exciting cities.Marion Barnaby, Championship Manager, Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY, said: “Seeing Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY racecars line up on the grid in December will be a proud and historic moment for Jaguar, and spectators can expect plenty of action from the races. As we travel to some of the world’s most exciting cities we’ll be bringing a new kind of electric street racing to the public and inspiring the next generation of electric vehicle owners.”Later this month, teams will travel to the iconic Silverstone circuit to take delivery of their Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY racecars and take part in the first of the official pre-season tests.The Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY race will be 25 minutes plus one lap. This will follow practice and qualifying sessions in the build up to each race. Jaguar plan for each race to feature a VIP entrant, with famous faces from the world of motorsport and beyond set to take part. Jaguar recently announced that the prize fund for the series is in excess of £500,000 per season.Sabelt have also been confirmed as technical partner providing seats, seatbelts, steering wheels and head protection nets.Massimiliano Marsiaj, Sabelt Deputy Chairman & Business Development said: “We are really proud to work with Jaguar. I think we have laid the foundation for a new and lasting collaboration. Thanks to the work of our two technical departments, we have already developed together a new racing seat. Electric cars are the future and we always want to progress with the times.”For more information please visit: www.jaguar.com/electrification/i-pace-e-trophy Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Jaguar has revealed the full calendar for the inaugural season of the Jaguar I-PACE eTrophy series that will support Formula E events from the start of the 2018/19 championship. read more

Car Collector Calls Tesla Model S Faster Better Cheaper Than The Rest

first_img New Tesla Model 3 Or Used Tesla Model S – Updated Video SWISS CAR LOVER: MY TESLA MODEL S IS FASTER, BETTER AND CHEAPER THAN ANY CAR I’VE OWNEDMarco “Speedy” Jeanrenaud, a resident of the Lake Geneva region of Switzerland, is a connoisseur of the automobile. A lover of classic American cars, he has owned a 1976 Cadillac, a Dodge Charger, several Ford Mustangs, a Range Rover SUV, and Harley and BMW motorcycles (as well as more prosaic vehicles, including a Hyundai minivan and a Honda Civic).Check Out These Stories: Source: Electric Vehicle News *This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs. Source: Charged (via Marco “Speedy” Jeanrenaud)Speedy soon became an ordained Tesla EVangelist, and since then he eagerly explains to anyone who will listen why they ought to go electric too. The performance and amenities of his Model S are far superior to any car Mr. Jeanrenaud has owned. Since becoming accustomed to the Tesla, he’s driven several high-end gas burners, which he now describes as “pieces of junk” (and other, more colorful epithets).Speedy is convinced that, in the long run, the Tesla is cheaper as well. To prove it, the analytically-minded Swiss prepared a spreadsheet with data on his favorite cars that he’s owned. Source: Charged (via Marco “Speedy” Jeanrenaud)For years, he was highly skeptical of hybrids and EVs, but like most of his performance-loving ilk, was intrigued by Tesla. He took a couple of test drives, but wasn’t ready to step on the pedal until one day in 2016 when he went to a launch event for a new Jaguar. There was a Model S next to the new Jag in the parking lot, and that was all anyone at the party seemed to be talking about.After another test drive and a few long talks with his wife, Mr. Jeanrenaud bought a dealer demonstrator Model S 70D for a bargain price of 74,000 Swiss francs ($75,480).center_img Watch This Love / Hate Review Of Cheapest Used Tesla Model S Source: Charles Morris (via Marco “Speedy” Jeanrenaud)He assumed usage of 40,000 km/year, and a gas price of 1.50 francs per liter. His local electric utility offers a time-of-use rate that reduces his electricity cost by 50% when he charges after 9:00 pm. Based on this, along with usage data from the past two years, Mr. J calculates that it costs about 1,200 Swiss francs to drive 40,000 km. “It is cheaper to drive a Tesla than anything else,” he says.===Written by: Charles Morris. An earlier version of this article appeared in Charged.*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here. Check Out This Used Tesla Model S With A Brand New Battery Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 19, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Tesla Model X Hits Tree Splits In Two Catches Fire

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Number of Tesla Fire-Related Deaths Per Year Equals What? Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model X On Fire In California: Video High rate of speed suspected.Fire erupted after a Tesla Model X collided with a tree and split in two.Three teenagers were seriously injured in the wreck. One sustained life-threatening injuries. No fatalities reported.More Tesla News A 2017 Tesla Model X was driven off the road where it struck a tree. The violent collision split the car in two. Fire began shortly after impact, as the battery pack had been compromised.Clean up of the wreckage is reportedly still underway, as battery cells were spread throughout the brush.News Times reports:Three teenagers were injured after one drove a 2017 Tesla Model X off the road and into a tree in southern New Hampshire on Wednesday, according to state police.Speed was likely a factor in the accident, according to the accident report, and the car split in two and caught fire after the impact. The driver and one passenger were taken to a community hospital with “serious but non-life threatening injuries,” while the third passenger was taken to the UMass hospital in Worcester with life-threatening injuries. 3 Teens Injured After Tesla Split In Two During Fiery NH Crash https://t.co/Lp7sh0GW59 pic.twitter.com/Rk7LzGp476— WBZ | CBS Boston News (@wbz) December 27, 2018 Update on the Rindge crash:No fatalities. One car hit a tree off of Perry Rd.3 victims — a 19 y/o woman and a boy and a girl, both 17. The 17 y/os were taken to Monadnock hospital, the 19 y/o was taken to UMASS (no specifics beyond that). pic.twitter.com/dlepFNzIVz— Jake Lahut (@JakeLahut) December 27, 2018 Developing story…Source: News Times A day after this horrific crash in Rindge, NH, firefighters still trying to clean up thousands of #Tesla batteries left behind. Hear from a family member of one of the teenage victims coming up at 4 pm on @NBC10Boston and @NECN pic.twitter.com/FPt0JGze3B— Katherine Underwood NBC10 Boston (@KathNBCBoston) December 27, 2018 Tesla Model S Fire From Flat Tire & A Tow Truck? Videoslast_img read more

Construction Of Mercedes Untertürkheim Battery Plant Officially Starts

first_imgAt the site of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant in Germany, the construction of the battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant starts in the presence of numerous guests of honour from the world of politics and business.With the factory for traction batteries – the first in the Neckar Valley – the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant gears itself even more to electric mobility.Dieter Zetsche, Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars: “The laying of the foundation for the battery factory at the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant is a good sign for the sustainability of mobility and for the economy – and thus also for the people in the region. The battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant stands for our promise to make both our cars as well as their production even greener.“Winfried Kretschmann, Minister President of the German state of Baden-Württemberg, said: “In recent years we have done a great deal to meet our clear goal of zero emissions in traffic. And in laying the foundation stone for this battery plant, we are taking a further step towards this goal. We want the new mobility to be emission-free, connected and autonomous. And Daimler is a decisive proponent of this.”Stuttgart. With the symbolic foundation laying ceremony for the first battery factory, the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant is advancing its transformation into a high-tech location for electric mobility. The new battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant is an important component in the global battery production network within the production network of Mercedes-Benz Cars comprising a total of nine battery factories at seven locations on three continents. By the end of the decade, Mercedes-Benz Cars will produce high-efficiency traction batteries for future Mercedes-Benz electric vehicles of the EQ product and technology brand on 12,000 m2 in a newly erected and carbon-neutral battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant near Stuttgart, the state capital of Baden-Württemberg, Germany.The foundation laying ceremony was attended by: Dieter Zetsche, Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars, Winfried Kretschmann, Minister President of the German state of Baden-Württemberg, Wolfgang Reimer, District President of the Stuttgart Administrative District, Dr Jürgen Zieger, Lord Mayor of the City of Esslingen, Frank Deiß, Head of Powertrain Production Mercedes-Benz Cars and Site Manager of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant, and Michael Häberle, Works Council Chairman of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant.“The laying of the foundation for the battery factory at the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant is a good sign for the sustainability of the mobility and for the economy – and thus also for the people in the region. The battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant stands for our promise to make both our cars as well as their production even greener. In future, we will assemble the heart of the electric car – the battery – here ourselves,” says Dieter Zetsche, Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars.The battery is a key component of electric mobility and an integral part of the vehicle architecture. The intelligence of the battery lies in a total package of hardware and software. Development, production and integration of complex battery systems are among the core competencies of Mercedes-Benz Cars.“In recent years we have done a great deal to meet our clear goal of zero emissions in traffic. And in laying the foundation stone for this battery plant, we are taking a further step towards this goal. We want the new mobility to be emission-free, connected and autonomous. And Daimler is a decisive proponent of this. With a major electric initiative, as well as with emission-free products and production methods, Daimler is going full speed ahead for sustainable mobility. The battery plants here and in Sindelfingen will strengthen Baden-Württemberg’s role as a leading provider of sustainable mobility, and help to safeguard value creation and employment over the long term,” says Minister President Winfried Kretschmann. “But if we want to progress from automobile region no. 1 to mobility region no. 1 in the world, occasional innovations will not be enough. What we need is a whole firework of innovations. This is why two years ago, I created a new format that brings politics, business, science and society around one table: the strategic dialogue for the automobile industry in Baden-Württemberg. A new type of format for a new order of historic transformation. And Daimler has contributed greatly to this from the very start,” said Winfried Kretschmann, Minister President of the German state of Baden-Württemberg.Mercedes-Benz Cars is investing more than one billion euros in a global battery production network within the worldwide Mercedes-Benz Cars production network. The battery production network currently comprises nine factories at seven locations on three continents. Local battery production is a major success factor in the electric initiative of Mercedes-Benz Cars, and the crucial component when it comes to meeting the worldwide demand for electric vehicles flexibly and efficiently. The global battery production network ensures the competitiveness of Mercedes-Benz Cars and puts the particular locations on a competitive footing. Daimler purchases the battery cells on the world market. The blocks of cells are assembled into an installation-ready overall battery system in the battery factories – including housing, control unit as well as functional testing.“Our powertrain production network is in the midst of the transformation. With the battery production at the Untertürkheim plant, we are further advancing the transition into a high-tech location for components of electric mobility. At the same time, we continue to produce conventional engines, axles, transmissions and components in large numbers. This flexibility of the team makes us strong,” said Frank Deiß, Head of Powertrain Production Mercedes-Benz Cars and Site Manager of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant. With the factory for traction batteries – the first in the Neckar Valley – the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant gears itself even more to electric mobility.The production of batteries requires maximum precision and expertise. All employees who will work on the assembly line in the Brühl sub-plant will be trained in the area of high-voltage technology. In addition, they earn the necessary qualifications in a pilot factory for batteries at the Untertürkheim location.“With the construction of the new battery factory as part of Daimler’s e-offensive, the next milestone on the migration path from the internal combustion engine to electric mobility will be laid here in Brühl. Being a university city with more than 100 years of tradition in mechanical and electrical engineering, Esslingen supplies precisely those well-trained professionals that drive and implement the current structural change in the automotive industry concerning product planning, supply chains and production processes. The current investment in the new battery factory here in the Neckar-valley is therefore a unique commitment to the city of Esslingen as industrial site of future technologies,” said Dr Jürgen Zieger, Lord Mayor of the City of Esslingen.E-projects at the Untertürkheim locationAs part of the negotiations on the target visions of recent years, a “Project Centre eATS” has been in existence at the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant since autumn 2018 in order to build up know-how for the next generation of an electronic powertrain (eATS). There is also an “E-Technical Centre”, where prototypes for the electric powertrain are built, amongst other things. In addition, since the beginning of 2019 the Untertürkheim plant has been responsible for the battery pilot factory. It forms the bridge between development and series production. This is where the energy storage units are tested and optimised for a production-oriented product design in order to ensure an efficient large-scale production in the worldwide battery factories. In addition to building the batteries, the pilot factory qualifies employees for the future series production at the Brühl and Hedelfingen sub-plants. The Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant thus bundles important skills as a pilot factory, especially for the battery production. Furthermore, the company announced in 2018 that the capacity would be doubled again beyond the battery production already agreed with the works council the previous year. In addition, it was agreed that a battery factory will also be added at the Hedelfingen sub-plant of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant.Michael Häberle, Works Council Chairman Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim Plant: “Many colleagues working in gasoline and diesel engine production have to be qualified for the new alternative powertrains and especially for working on the high-voltage systems. We have signed a job security agreement with the company through to the end of 2029. That is why investments in issues with long-term prospects are necessary at the location. This includes today’s ground-breaking for the battery factory.“ As part of the planned “Project Future” reorganisation, company management and the works council have agreed to extend safeguarding the future through to the end of 2029. Business-related lay-offs are precluded until then. The provision goes into effect with the start of the new structure likely from autumn 2019.About the battery production networkMercedes-Benz Cars is investing more than one billion euros in a global battery production network within the worldwide Mercedes-Benz Cars production network comprising nine battery factories at seven locations on three continents. Daimler subsidiary Accumotive has been already producing batteries for hybrid and electric vehicles in Kamenz since 2012 and is currently building a second battery factory there, which will begin large-scale production of traction batteries for the Mercedes-Benz EQC (power consumption combined: 22.2 kWh/100 km; CO2 emissions combined: 0 g/km, provisional figures)[1] in 2019. Daimler is building three battery factories in the Greater Stuttgart region: At the Brühl and Hedelfingen sub-plants of the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim Plant as well as at the Mercedes-Benz Sindelfingen Plant. In China, Daimler and joint-venture partner BAIC are currently jointly building a battery factory at the existing location in the Yizhuang Industrial Park in Beijing. Construction of a battery factory is also under way near the existing Mercedes-Benz plant in Tuscaloosa, USA. Together with local partner Thonburi Automotive Assembly Plant (TAAP), Mercedes-Benz Cars is setting up a battery production plant in Bangkok, Thailand. Furthermore, a battery factory is currently emerging in the Polish town of Jawor, where Mercedes-Benz Cars is building an engine production plant.About the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plantThe Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant looks back on more than 115 years of tradition and is the largest location in the global powertrain production network and home to Daimler Group headquarters. With more than 19,000 employees, the plant produces engines, axles, transmissions and components. The tradition-rich plant is a hi-tech location and a centre of competence for high-efficiency engines, hybrid powertrains and the production of fuel-cell systems. Research and Development is also located here with a test track for vehicle testing. The plant comprises six sub-plants in all. While Untertürkheim and Bad Cannstatt produce engines and also house the forge, the transmissions are produced in Hedelfingen. The axle production and the foundry are located in Mettingen. The training organisation is based in Brühl, the flexible production facilities are in Esslingen at the Sirnau Bridge.Please note: Photo material of the foundation laying ceremony at the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant will be made available on 5 April 2019 from about 1 p.m. CEST on the Daimler Media Site www.media.daimler.com.[1] Figures for power consumption and CO2 emissions are provisional and were determined by the Technical Service. The range figures are also provisional. EC type approval and certificate of conformity with official figures are not yet available. Differences between the stated figures and the official figures are possible. Daimler Forms Global Joint Venture With Geely To Develop Smart 9 battery pack plants at 7 sites on three continents:two plants (Deutsche Accumotive) in Kamenz, Germany – first since 2012, second start production in Spring 2019plant in Beijing, China – Currently Daimler and Joint-Venture partner BAIC together are building a local battery production at the existing location in Yizhuang Industrial Parkplant in Tuscaloosa, Alabama – Near the existing Mercedes-Benz SUV plant in Tuscaloosa (USA) construction works of a battery factory have recently begunplant in Bangkok, Thailand – Together with the local partner Thonburi Automotive Assembly Plan (TAAP) construction is underwaytwo plants planned in Stuttgart-Untertürkheim, Germanyplant planned in Sindelfingen, Germanyplant in Jawor, Poland Daimler news Bosch Takes Over EM-motive: Electric Motor Joint Venture With Daimler Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img Mercedes-Benz Announces New Battery Factory In Poland Battery plant investment moves forwardDaimler held the symbolic foundation laying ceremony for the battery factory at the Mercedes-Benz Untertürkheim plant (at the Brühl sub-plant) in Germany, which is set to produce battery packs for further Mercedes-Benz EQ models.There are not many details about the project, besides that it’s one of total nine announced battery pack plants that will be built globally in the next few years.“The new battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant is an important component in the global battery production network within the production network of Mercedes-Benz Cars comprising a total of nine battery factories at seven locations on three continents. By the end of the decade, Mercedes-Benz Cars will produce high-efficiency traction batteries for future Mercedes-Benz electric vehicles of the EQ product and technology brand on 12,000 m2 in a newly erected and carbon-neutral battery factory at the Brühl sub-plant near Stuttgart, the state capital of Baden-Württemberg, Germany.”“Daimler purchases the battery cells on the world market. The blocks of cells are assembled into an installation-ready overall battery system in the battery factories – including housing, control unit as well as functional testing.” Source: Electric Vehicle News Press blast:Expansion of the global battery production network: Mercedes-Benz Cars lays foundation for a battery factory at the Untertürkheim sitelast_img read more

Fizzy Ravens the Craven pick

first_imgShares00 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Ron Cox Read more First published on Wed 16 Apr 2008 19.00 EDT Share on Facebook Fizzy Raven’s the Craven pick Share on Pinterest Horse racing Four years ago, Haafhd gave the Craven Stakes a much-needed boost as a 2,000 Guineas trial when he won both races. No Guineas winner had previously been successful in the Group 3 contest since Tirol in 1990, and it is more customary nowadays for the colts’ Classic to be won by a seasonal debutant.John Gosden, however, feels a run at Newmarket today will put Raven’s Pass (3.45) right for the Guineas. Like Haafhd, Raven’s Pass finished third in the Dewhurst Stakes on his final juvenile outing. That form, plus the style of his seven-lengths victory in the Solario Stakes, makes him the clear form pick. Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share via Emailcenter_img The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share via Email Topics Raven’s Pass raced like the best horse in the Dewhurst for most of the way, but he was ultimately found wanting on rain-softened ground.It should be more suitable today, but what could get Raven’s Pass beaten is his own freshness. Gosden has said the colt needs a run to take the “fizz” out of him and Kandahar Run, in the Feilden Stakes yesterday, was a good example of what can happen when a horse races too freely on its comeback outing.There is certainly nothing wrong with the form of the Gosden horses, and Pipedreamer (4.20), who went from strength to strength last year, would not be the first Cambridgeshire Handicap winner to go on and prove himself a Group horse.Ron Cox’s tip of the daySadeek 5.05 RiponA useful two-year-old when trained by Kevin Ryan to win the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, Sadeek was well beaten in three handicaps after joining Bryan Smart late last season but it is too soon to be writing him off. Smart reports Sadeek in excellent shape and this trainer can get the best out of sprinters. Rated 100 on his first run for present connections, Sadeek is now on a handy 82. Wed 16 Apr 2008 19.00 EDT Share on Twitter Horse racing Share on WhatsApp Since you’re here… Support The Guardian Reuse this content Share on Twitterlast_img read more

TC Heartland Anniversary EDTX Patent Filings Plummet NDTX Benefits

first_imgThe U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark patent jurisdiction decision one year ago has dramatically impacted the patent litigation dockets for the Eastern, Northern and Southern Districts of Texas. The Texas Lawbook has some exclusive new data that shows the true impact of the ruling, and some of the findings are not what the experts predicted . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember me Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

Another Look at Successful Aging

first_imgby, Jeanette Leardi, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare309ShareEmail309 SharesTwo and a half years ago, I wrote a piece for this blog called “Successful” Aging –– On Whose Terms?, mistakenly assuming that I had covered all of the points I wanted to make on the subject. I asserted at the time that “there’s an inherent problem with equating aging with the kind of success that is solely based on conscious individual achievement.” I argued that even if an older person has made the effort to secure adequate health and wealth, as well as to be socially interactive and passionately engaged in living, such success is never solely due to that person’s choices, actions, and abilities. Luck and uncontrollable external factors play equally influential roles in the outcome.But even now, if I do a Google search for “successful aging” or merely sample the feature articles in newspapers and magazines, it appears that the term, with all its attached misconceptions, is slow to die.And I wish it would. Quickly. Here’s why.Every time we assign the sole responsibility of aging well to an individual, we disregard that person’s uniqueness in a very unrealistic and unjust way. Each of us has gone through a combination of biological and socioeconomic experiences that have affected us at every turn.Are you a male or a female? Are you a member of an ethnic or racial majority or minority? Females and minorities in general are economically disadvantaged throughout their lifespan, earning less than their white, male counterparts and subsequently receiving smaller pensions and Social Security benefits. In addition, more women than men leave the job market, becoming unpaid laborers who raise children and/or care for elder parents.Have you spent most of your life on a farm or in the middle of a big city? Did you inherit great wealth or have you had to earn all or most of your income? How much education were you able to afford and receive? What career paths were open to you? Did you ever experience serious health problems that affected your ability to work? How many children, if any, do you have, and are they willing and able to help you in your later years if you need support? Do you have easy access to nearby and affordable housing, transportation, and other vital services for older adults?Somehow questions such as these are still not factored into definitions of successful aging in most media discussions. And because these factors aren’t foremost in the public’s consciousness as issues to address, they are often ignored or considered irrelevant in government and private-sector policy decisions. This situation must change.For “success” implies accomplishment within an established system. But what if that system is outmoded, disjointed, or worse, deliberately fostering social inequality? Then successful agers who have been lucky, wealthy, and in the majority are aging well because of our social policies and cultural norms. But agers in other categories who have managed nevertheless to age well are successful despite those same policies and norms. Their challenge has been far greater.And let’s not forget that there is a huge population of older adults who struggle to stay economically and physically stable as well as purposefully and socially engaged. In many cases their difficulties could be significantly eased if our society would only redefine “successful aging” in less polarizing terms. Let’s stop evaluating aging as either the result of being ambitious and productive or being negligent and irresponsible.In fact, let’s totally ban the term “successful aging.” We need to replace that unproductive and discriminatory paradigm with one that is realistic, compassionate, and fair –– one requiring an equal commitment between the individual and society.Let’s coin a new term: “Empowered Aging.”Why “empowered”? Because it moves the focus away from the static goal of accomplishment and toward an ongoing process of maintaining autonomy, dignity, and self-worth through interdependence.This bilateral commitment should be fostered throughout a person’s life, starting from childhood. We should be raising children to appreciate every age through which they pass, and expecting our cultural values to honor and support them all along the way, in their education, careers, personal relationships, and social contributions.When an individual’s skills, values, aspirations, personal history, and beliefs are continuously supported by a pro-aging society’s common goals, expectations, opportunities, and public policies, empowerment becomes the inevitable human condition.And isn’t that the kind of success we should aim to achieve?Related Posts“Successful” Aging –– on Whose Terms?How we perceive aging and the viability of older adults determines our willingness –– or reluctance –– to tackle social inequity, lack of access to services and opportunities, and other common challenges our elders face.Successful Aging Does Not Equal Aging without DisabilityWhat does successful aging look like? In one of the more influential papers on the subject published in 1987, Rowe and Kahn describe successful aging as involving freedom from disease and disability. This definition has been adapted over time but is still being used today. Take a recent study published…Wise Up: Study AgingI am certainly not blind to how fortuitously my interest in aging aligns with the needs of an aging world—and I certainly don’t need additional convincing that my decision to forgo law school was in equal measure, wise and slightly prescient. But maybe you do.TweetShare309ShareEmail309 SharesTags: culture change perception Successful Aginglast_img read more

New findings point to potential therapeutic avenues for leukemia

first_imgMay 9 2018Scientists have known for decades that the Hox family of transcription factors are key regulators in the formation of blood cells and the development of leukemia. Exactly how this large family of genes, which are distributed in four separate chromosomal clusters named A through D, is regulated has been less clear. Now, new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reveals that a DNA regulatory element within the Hoxb cluster globally mediates signals to the majority of Hoxb genes to control their expression in blood-forming stem cells.”It’s like we found a general control that simultaneously turns the lights on and off in many rooms, rather than having a single switch that controls each individual room,” says Stowers Investigator Linheng Li, PhD, who co-led the study along with Stowers Scientific Director and Investigator Robb Krumlauf, PhD. These findings also help explain why a particular form of leukemia resists treatment and points to potential new therapeutic avenues.In mammals, the blood system contains a number of mature cell types -; white blood cells, red blood cells, platelets -; that arise from blood-forming, or hematopoietic, stem cells (HSCs). HSCs renew themselves and differentiate into other cells to replenish the body’s blood supply in a process called hematopoiesis. Hox genes, which are well known for their roles in establishing the body plan of developing organisms, are also important for HSCs to maintain their critical balancing act in the adult blood system, and have been implicated in the development of leukemia.In an article published online May 3, 2018, in Cell Stem Cell, Li, Krumlauf, and co-authors including first author Pengxu Qian, PhD, second author Bony De Kumar, PhD, and other collaborators provide new details as to how Hox genes are regulated in HSCs. They report that a single cis-regulatory element, DERARE, works over a long range to control the majority of Hoxb genes in HSCs in a coordinated manner. The researchers found that the loss of the DERARE decreased Hoxb expression and altered the types of blood cells arising from HSCs, whereas “turning on” DERARE allowed Hoxb cluster gene expression in progenitor cells and increased the progression of leukemia.Genes can be regulated by non-coding DNA sequences termed cis-regulatory sequences. These sequences get input from multiple types of molecules, such as transcription factors, histone modifiers, or various morphogens. The DERARE, or distal element RARE (retinoic acid response element), is a cis-regulatory element that responds to signals from the vitamin A derivative retinoic acid and determines the fate of HSCs.Related StoriesCancer stem cells elude the body’s immune cells by deactivating danger detectorMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Using human leukemia cell lines and mouse models, the Stowers researchers and collaborators have identified a mechanism for how the retinoid-sensitive DERARE maintains normal hematopoiesis and prevents acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by regulating Hoxb cluster genes in a methylation-dependent manner.Methylation is the process of adding methyl groups to the DNA molecule, which can change the activity of the DNA segment. The researchers demonstrated that DNA methyltransferases mediate DNA methylation on DERARE, leading to reduced Hoxb cluster expression. AML patients with mutations in the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A exhibit reduced DERARE methylation, elevated Hoxb expression, and adverse outcomes.”In two human AML cell lines carrying a DNMT3A mutation, we used an adaptation of genome editing technology called dCas9-DNMT3A to specifically increase the DNA methylation on DERARE. This targeted methylation technique was able to reduce Hoxb cluster expression and alleviate the progression of leukemia,” says Qian. “It is known that Hoxb cluster genes show a dramatic increase in expression in patients with DNMT3A-mutated AML. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the use of DNA methylation on the DERARE as a potential screening tool for therapeutic drugs that target DNMT3A-mutated AML, thus leading to the development of new drugs for treating AML, in which DNA methylation is abnormal.”Kumar adds, “This paper effectively shows that methylation status of DERARE in the middle of the Hoxb cluster acts as a key determinant to maintain normal hematopoiesis. Further, aberrant methylation patterns in this region are evident in the development of human leukemia. We have shown the importance of generating appropriate methylation patterns in the DERARE control element in normal hematopoiesis and in leukemia.” Source: https://www.stowers.org/media/news/may-7-2018last_img read more

Obesity linked with worse symptoms for lupus patients

first_img Source:http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/arthritis-care-research/obesity-may-worsen-symptoms-patients-lupus May 10 2018In a recent Arthritis Care & Research study of 148 women with lupus, obesity was linked with worse disease activity, depressive symptoms, and symptoms of pain and fatigue. The association was consistent across different definitions of obesity.The study’s findings highlight the need for lifestyle interventions in lupus patients who are overweight to help reduce health risks and the debilitating symptoms of the disease.”In addition to reducing the risk of comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, lifestyle interventions to improve body composition may reduce the severity of symptoms experienced by persons with lupus,” said senior author Dr. Patricia Katz, of the University of California, San Francisco.Lead author Dr. Sarah Patterson noted that the findings have important clinical implications because the patient-reported outcomes we measured, particularly pain and fatigue, are known to have profound effects on quality of life and remain a major area of unmet need for people with lupus.last_img read more

Tests show Drexels polymer crystal nanocapsules can last longer in bloodstream

first_imgAug 1 2018Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task at the post office. For some time, scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed a new type of container that seems to be the perfect fit for making the delivery.Intravenous medication has taken important leaps in recent years as a way of directly targeting ailments where they are occurring inside the body. But getting the medicine through the bloodstream to the right place and releasing it at the right time is no easy task. The body is designed to detect and eliminate foreign objects, so successfully designing a vessel for targeted drug delivery requires equal parts engineering and cunning.”Delivery vessels have traditionally been designed to avoid recognition by the immune system by mimicking naturally occurring materials in the body, such as cells or liposomes,” said Christopher Li, PhD, a materials science professor in Drexel’s College of Engineering. “But the problem with the previously reported artificial carriers is that they’re not always durable enough to get to the far reaches of the body.”Li and Hao Cheng, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering lead a group of researchers who have been developing a polymer crystal casing for intravenous medicine delivery. Their work, which was recently published in the journal Nature Communicationsshows how these “crystalsomes,” designed to be durable enough for long, intravenous journeys, can outlast current artificial nanoparticle packaging – which means doctors can use it to directly treat maladies in the body, with precisely the right amount of medication.”Crystalsomes structurally mimic the classical liposome and polymersomes used for drug delivery, yet mechanically they are more robust thanks to their single crystal-like shell,” Li said.In blood circulation and biodistribution experiments, Li’s polymer crystalsomes have a 24-hour half-life and can last in the bloodstream for more than 96 hours – figures that far exceed current injectable medication.”Crystalsomes are closely sealed so that medication will not be released until it reaches the target sites. Thus medication can be delivered in higher doses, as desired, to afflictions in the body, without causing severe side-effects associated with the early release of the medicine,” Li said. “And a more direct intravenous delivery means that treatments are likely to be more effective.”Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellResearchers discover gene linked to healthy aging in wormsGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Li’s group combined its unique work on growing crystal spheres and self-assembled nanobrushes to produce this special capsule that is just thick enough to safely encase the medicine, and also features an array of polymer strands that can ward off the proteins that flag foreign bodies for removal.The method for creating the crystalsomes, which Li’s Soft Materials Lab initially developed in 2016, looks something like combining oil and water to create suspended liquid beads. In this application, the beads encapsulate two types of polymer strands that, when cooled, condense into the solid, egg shell-like spherical crystalsome, protecting the yolk-like cargo inside.While one set of polymers, called poly L-lactide acid or PLLA, are drawing together to form the corrugated casing of the sphere, the other variety, poly ethylene glycol or PEG, coming to attention like whiskers on its surface. PEG polymers are known to prevent proteins from attaching to solid surfaces, so the uniform distribution of these polymers on the outside of the crystalsome prevent it from being flagged by the proteins of the immune system as a bodily invader.”Taken together, these characteristics give the crystalsome its superior staying power in the bloodstream,” said Cheng, whose research group specializes in engineering molecules for intravenous drug delivery.The discovery provides a strategy for producing long-circulating nanomaterials, which could lead to a new class of polymer nanoparticle carriers for drug delivery and gene therapy, according to the researchers.”The ingenious, curved, polymer crystal nanocapsules reported here remain robust while circulating in the blood, a potentially important feature for delivering medications and gene therapies,” said Andrew Lovinger, the materials research program officer who oversaw National Science Foundation funding of the work. “NSF is proud to have supported this important research, which integrates the agency’s missions to promote the progress of science as well as contribute to advancing the nation’s health.” Source:http://drexel.edu/last_img read more

New method tags breast implants with tomato DNA to prevent counterfeiting

first_imgAug 2 2018For years, a French company sold breast implants made of cheap industrial silicone components. Headline news when it broke in 2010, this scandal is still keeping the courts busy today. Now, a research team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP has come up with a method to prevent this sort of fraud. It gives manufacturers the opportunity to counterfeit-proof implants – by tagging them with encapsulated tomato DNA.With business going global, product counterfeiting has become a growing problem for manufacturers. Consumers are at risk when counterfeiters set their sights on sensitive products such as medical equipment and drugs. Fakes are usually inferior. They can seriously harm patients’ health and even jeopardize lives, as the scandal surrounding a French breast implant manufacturer goes to show. The company cut corners, blending in unapproved silicones to slash production costs (more on this in the box “How breast implants are made”).This kind of illegal manipulation is almost untraceable. It takes elaborate analyses to detect such tampering. “Counterfeiters generally buy high-quality individual components from reputable suppliers and stretch them with cheap silicone, which costs a fraction of the premium material. Product pirates turn huge profits,” says Dr. Joachim Storsberg, a scientist at the Fraunhofer IAP in Potsdam and an expert witness in court cases centered on breast implants. A method to substantiate both quantitative and qualitative manipulations of one or more components would be ideal.Zero chances of product piracyStorsberg and his team – which includes Marina Volkert from Berlin’s Beuth University of Applied Sciences – developed precisely this type of procedure. It has already been patented. The idea is to use DNA sequences as permanent markers to positively identify implants. This gives manufacturers the opportunity to tag products with a counterfeit-proof marker and thereby enhance patient safety. The source material is sure to raise eyebrows: tomato DNA makes the perfect marker, as various experiments have substantiated. “We isolated genomic DNA (gDNA) from tomato leaves and embedded it in the silicone matrix. We used approved siloxanes, which are building blocks for silicone products, to manufacture breast implants,” explains Storsberg. The researchers managed to demonstrate the extracted DNA’s temperature stability in pilot experiments. They vulcanized the gDNA in the host silicone at 150 degrees for five hours and then tested it with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique to amplify DNA, and with a special analytical method call gel electrophoresis. The DNA remained stable and did not degrade.”Breast implants are made up of components; that is, several silicone polymers that cross-link to form a gel. The components’ manufacturer now has the option of marking silicones with the encapsulated tomato DNA sequence during the production process. He alone knows the type and concentration of the DNA used. The components are marked first, and then sold to the implant manufacturer. The PCR method can detect if the manufacturer stretched components with inferior materials or used a lower concentration. “This works much like a paternity test,” says Storsberg. The advantage of tomato DNA is that it costs next to nothing and is suitable as a counterfeit-proof marker for many polymer-based implants such lens implants.​ Source:https://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2018/august/marking-breast-implants-with-tomato-DNA-to-prevent-counterfeiting.htmllast_img read more

TransEnterix files FDA 510k submission for its new Senhance Ultrasonic Instrument System

first_img Source:https://transenterix.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 6 2018TransEnterix, Inc., a medical device company that is digitizing the interface between surgeons and patients to improve minimally invasive surgery, today announced the Company filed a FDA 510(k) submission for its Senhance Ultrasonic Instrument System.Advanced energy devices, including ultrasonic devices, represent some of the most versatile and critical tools for surgeons in minimally invasive surgery. These instruments deliver controlled energy to effectively ligate and divide tissue, and minimize thermal injury to surrounding structures.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid research”Advanced energy devices are an important tool within laparoscopic surgery because of their applicability within a wide range of procedures,” said Todd M. Pope, TransEnterix CEO. “Once approved, we believe the addition of the Senhance Ultrasonic will be a useful tool for surgeons and help drive broader penetration of Senhance and help advance digital laparoscopy in the U.S.””Advanced energy devices, such as the one now developed for Senhance, represent the most common tools that surgeons utilize when performing challenging tissue dissections,” said Dr. Guy Orangio, FACS, FASCRS, Chief Section of Colorectal Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans, and Past President of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. “Adding such capability to a digital laparoscopic platform will further enable wide clinical use.”last_img read more

Top stories A monster black hole how to prevent allergies and naming

first_imgThis week’s quiz: How well do you know science’s most famous animals? Test your knowledge!Common ingredient in packaged food may trigger inflammatory diseaseHere’s another reason to avoid packaged foods—the ingredients that make them stable may promote chronic inflammatory diseases. A new study suggests these ingredients mess with the barrier between our immune system and our gut bacteria. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Eating peanuts prevents allergyWant to avoid a peanut allergy? Eat peanuts. A new study finds that eating peanuts slashes the chance of developing a peanut allergy, at least in kids at high risk of developing one. The findings support a long-standing theory that ingesting potential food allergens can actually prevent allergies.Should research animals be named?Scientists once shied away from naming research animals. Now, except for rats and mice, most research animals have proper names. But is this practice good or bad for research? Have your say!Indian grad students take to streets over miserable payIndian postgraduate students have taken to the streets nationwide by the thousands over the past week to protest overdue hikes to government stipends. Unless demands are met soon, protest leaders promise to take more drastic action, such as a attempting a countrywide lab shutdown.Monster black hole born shortly after big bangAstronomers have discovered a monstrous black hole in a barely newborn galaxy, just 875 million years after the big bang. The monster is 3000 times the size of our Milky Way’s black hole, and to have grown so big so quickly, it must have been munching matter at close to the maximum physically possible rate for most of its life.Sound of mom’s voice boosts brain growth in premature babiesBabies born prematurely are more than twice as likely to have difficulty hearing and processing words than those carried to full-term. Now, an unusual study with 40 preemies suggests that recreating a womblike environment with recordings of a mother’s heartbeat and voice could potentially correct these deficits.DNA recovered from underwater British site may rewrite history of farming in EuropeA new study of ancient DNA from a now submerged hunter-gatherer camp off the British coast suggests that wheat made its way to the far edge of Western Europe 2000 years before farming was thought to have taken hold in Britain. In fact, hunter-gatherers may have brought agricultural products to the British Isles by trading wheat and other grains with early farmers from the European mainland.center_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Fungal toxins are poisoning Africas children says new report

first_imgChildren in Africa and parts of Asia are falling victim to an “invisible” epidemic—fungal toxins in food that can stunt their growth and delay their development, according to a new report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer and funded in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The two main toxins—aflatoxin and fumonisin—are present in dangerously high levels in groundnuts, cassava, and corn, which make up the bulk of children’s diets from Benin to Kenya.The toxins have long been known to cause liver cancer and, in high enough concentrations, death. But this is the first time that they have been shown by multiple studies to contribute significantly to childhood stunting.“It’s a massive problem” largely unknown in developed nations, says J. David Miller, a fungal toxicologist at Carleton University in Ottawa and one of the report authors. “Enormous amounts of money are spent [in the United States and Western Europe] to keep you from being exposed to these kinds of toxins.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The toxins, byproducts of the Aspergillus and Fusarium fungi, are endemic in cornfields around the world. The difference is that U.S. and European producers do all they can to eliminate the contaminants to meet strict standards for human consumption—20 parts per billion (ppb) in the United States and just 2 ppb in Europe. Fields are heavily treated, and crops are processed so that any remaining toxins are leached out. Food that isn’t up to standard is used as animal feed or burned. Altogether, U.S. food producers spend between $500 million and $1.5 billion each year managing fungal toxins.But in countries where food shortages are chronic, few farmers have the ability to treat their crops and enforcement is lax. The best-quality products are sold for export. “It makes me cry when I’m in Nampula in Mozambique and the women are there on the floor, sorting the grain by hand, trying to get the very best grain together and then send it to Europe,” says Peter J. Cotty, a plant pathologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service in Tucson, Arizona. “And it gets rejected by Europe. But it gets into the European bird feed market, which allows 50 [ppb], which no one in a developed nation would ever allow people to eat.”People back home are stuck with food with even higher levels of toxicity—sometimes in the thousands of ppb. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Researchers aren’t certain about exactly how the toxins affect children, but the new report brings together six recent studies that show that children with high levels of toxin biomarkers in their blood are shorter and weigh less than other children their age. They also grow at a slower pace than their peers. Preliminary studies suggest the effects may have something to do with immune system activation and the way the body absorbs nutrients.The report also lays out recommendations for controlling the problem, including treating fields with natural biocontrols, improving food storage conditions, and diet diversification. It also calls for the development of rapid screening methods that would be able to quickly detect the toxins in blood.Miller says that the problem is as much social as scientific. “It just seems to be intractable for a whole variety of reasons,” he says. “If you look in the scientific literature, 50 years ago, public policy people said more or less exactly what we’re saying now. And here we are.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Rates of stunting among children under 5 are as low as 2.1% in the United States and as high as 59.3% in Afghanistan, according to the latest World Health Organization data. Data from the World Health Organization Emaillast_img read more

A newly made RNA strand bolsters ideas about how life on Earth

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A fundamental property of life is the ability to replicate itself. Researchers have now created the first molecules of RNA, DNA’s singled-stranded relative, that are capable of copying almost any other RNAs. The discovery bolsters the widely held view among researchers who study the origin of life that RNA likely preceded DNA as the central genetic storehouse of information in the earliest cells some 4 billion years ago. Ironically, the new RNA copiers still can’t duplicate themselves. But if future souped-up versions can pull that off, it could do more than reinforce notions of RNA’s primordial role—it could lead to the creation of the synthetic modern microbes that use RNA as their sole source of genetic information.In order to grow and replicate, all modern cells require DNA, RNA, and proteins, and the synthesis of each inside cells requires the other two. Researchers in the 1960s hypothesized that modern cells evolved from progenitors that didn’t require this interdependence. RNA seemed a likely first biomolecule, because, like DNA, it can store information, and, like proteins, it can act as a catalyst to speed up certain chemical reactions. Researchers also discovered early on that RNA is at the core of several modern enzymes critical to life, such as the ribosome that builds proteins. So some scientists hypothesized life that started as an “RNA world”—a period in which RNA controlled both the genetics and biochemistry inside all cells. If RNA were central to early biochemistry, RNAs must have been able to copy themselves in order for those cells to multiply and evolve. Finding such an RNA copier “is the bull’s-eye of the RNA world hypothesis,” says Gerald Joyce, a chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California. Modern cells instead have a protein-based enzyme called RNA polymerase (RNAP) that copies strands of DNA into their RNA equivalent. In 1993, researchers led by Jack Szostak at Harvard University created an all-RNA version of RNAP, also known as an RNAP ribozyme, which joined two small pieces of RNA on a separate template RNA strand. Since then, Szostak’s team and other have continued to improve their RNA copiers. Two years ago, for example, researchers in the United Kingdom reported isolating an RNAP ribozyme capable of stitching together RNAs up to 200 nucleotides long, again when matching them up to a template strand. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The problem with all of these RNAP ribozymes, Joyce notes, is that they are finicky. They can copy only certain sequences of nucleotide bases, the building blocks that make up RNA and DNA, and those sequences don’t carry out any important function inside cells. So Joyce and his postdoctoral assistant David Horning attempted to come up with a more versatile RNAP ribozyme, using a well-known technique known as in vitro evolution.They started by synthesizing a large library of DNA strands intended to encode the starting RNAP ribozyme. But they randomly mutated the DNA sequence, ensuring each of the final RNAPs would be different. They added these RNAPs to a vial containing small RNA snippets they wanted to link together on another template RNA strand. If the RNAP ribozyme successfully created a new RNA, the new strand would signal that by binding to a specific molecular target in its vial. And because each RNAP ribozyme was engineered to remain tethered to its new, synthesized RNA strand, this allowed the team to isolate any successes. Each captured RNAP ribozyme was then used as the starting point for another round of evolution.After 24 rounds of this test tube evolution, in which the scientists successively upped the requirements for what a RNAP ribozyme had to do to be successful, they wound up with one called 24-3 polymerase. That RNA strand, they report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is able to copy almost any other RNA, from small catalysts to long RNA based enzymes. The 24-3 polymerase was also able to make copies of RNAs it had already copied, allowing it to amplify the presence of particular RNAs 10,000-fold. That provided the first RNA version of the polymerase chain reaction, a widely used technique to make copies of DNA.“This paper is an important breakthrough in an ongoing effort to complete the ‘RNA first’ model for the origin of life,” says Steven Benner, an origin-of-life chemist at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution in Alachua, Florida. But Benner cautions that a true confirmation of the RNA world remains a ways off. Not only does 24-3 polymerase’s tightly wound structure prevent it from being able to copy itself, but Benner notes that it has taken the chemistry community 25 years to come up with an RNA copier proficient at copying other RNAs, despite all the tools of modern biochemistry. “[That] suggests we are still missing something important,” Benner says.Joyce agrees and notes that even if an RNA world preceded the rise of DNA and proteins, it too may have been preceded by earlier forms of biochemistry. Nevertheless, Joyce adds, he and Horning are pressing on to improve 24-3 polymerase further in hopes of making a version that can copy itself. If they succeed, Joyce says, such a molecule could then become the basis for the first synthetic cells that use RNA as the sole genetic information molecule.last_img read more

Hungarian scientists are on edge as country is poised to force out

first_imgHungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, recently re-elected, has overseen budget boosts for science, but many researchers distrust his government’s intentions. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Hungarian scientists are on edge as country is poised to force out top university In early April, several days after Viktor Orbán secured his third consecutive term—and fourth overall—as Hungarian prime minister with a landslide victory for his conservative party, the pro-government paper Figyelő; published a list of more than 200 people it called “mercenaries” of George Soros, the American-Hungarian billionaire philanthropist. The list included investigative journalists and human rights advocates—and 30 academics from the Soros-founded, Budapest-based Central European University (CEU). Diána Ürge-Vorsatz was stunned to find herself accused.”I have no idea why I am on this list,” says the CEU environmental physicist, who was a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change when it won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. “I have had a very good working relationship with the Hungarian government for decades, and I want to maintain this.”Ürge-Vorsatz is one of many Hungarian academics unnerved by their government’s aggressive nationalist agenda, and the intensifying political pressures it is imposing on science. CEU, which attracts top students from Europe and elsewhere for its English-language graduate classes and has 17 research centers focusing on social sciences, business, environment, math, and other topics, has become a prime target, subject to tightening restrictions that some fear could force it out of Hungary. The main grant-funding body for Hungarian science, praised for its independence and transparency in a recent European review, has been replaced by an agency that scientists worry is more susceptible to political influence. And some researchers suggest that the government is increasingly wasting scarce funds on scholarship that promotes a particular agenda or controversial theories of national origin. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Kata KaráthMay. 10, 2018 , 4:00 AM Many scientists fear reprisals if they complain publicly—Ürge-Vorsatz had participated in a large pro-CEU protest before she was accused. But Hungary’s academic community has not been silent. “Search for truth, freedom of research, civic activism and support for those in need are crucial social values,” more 500 Hungarian academics declared in a recent petition. And the Hungarian Academy of Sciences quickly challenged the newspaper’s naming of CEU academics. “We find the issue of such harmful listings unacceptable, especially given their bitter resemblance to similar practices in Hungarian history,” it said in a statement.Government spokespeople declined to answer specific questions about CEU, but did address another flash point: the country’s growing embrace of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). On 16 April, Hungary’s University of Szeged signed an agreement with the Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine in Xianyang, China, to bring TCM researchers, medical experts, and lecturers to teach in the region. The University of Pécs in Hungary has had a similar arrangement since 2015.Last year, the Hungarian government also announced plans to allocate about €4.5 million ($5.3 million) to build a new institute with a whole floor dedicated to TCM at Semmelweis University, one of the most prestigious medical schools in Hungary. The government says it wants to bridge the gap between Western medicine and Eastern alternatives to improve Hungarian health care, and also strengthen the economic, political, and cultural ties between Hungary and China. AP PHOTO/BALAZS MOHAI Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email In May 2017, protesters in downtown Budapest rallied against government actions threatening Central European University. At the end of April, however, Zsolt Boldogkői, head of the Department of Medical Biology at the University of Szeged, lamented TCM’s growing influence in the country in an open letter to the president of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. “Acupuncture is based on pseudoscience and a technique unsuitable for medical purposes … teaching it on a university level is seriously damaging the reputation of science and fact-based medical treatments,” he wrote.The government has also been channeling significant funds to research institutes seen as backing its nationalist agenda. For example, the Migration Research Institute opened in Budapest in 2015, when an influx of immigrants caused a crisis in Hungary. Since then, it has published many analyses documenting the downside of immigration and the efficacy of the barbed wire fence along the southern borders of Hungary, and questioning the legitimacy of a 2017 European Court of Human Rights decision that said Hungary had wrongfully deported Bangladeshi asylum seekers.Academics are also wary of the recently announced László Gyula Institute, named after a historian who studied Hungarian national origins. The research institute hasn’t opened yet—no site has been chosen nor staff hired—but it reportedly will be managed by the National Institute for Culture, which is run by a private foundation established by Sándor Lezsák, deputy speaker of the Hungarian Parliament. Lezsák is an outspoken nationalist who has supported ideas on the roots of Hungarians opposed by most historians, including the theory that they are related to the Huns, Asiatic nomads who were a feared enemy of the Roman Empire.Hungarian archaeologists complain that the new institute will compete with the efforts of a research unit, run by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, that already focuses on the same period. “Little is revealed about this [new] institute just yet, but naming it after a publicly well-known archaeologist sounds like a publicity stunt,” says one Hungarian university archaeologist, who requested anonymity.For now, the scientific community mostly trusts the independence of its major national funder, the National Research, Development and Innovation Office (NRDI) in Budapest, which has a budget of about €260 million ($310 million) for research and innovation this year. In 2015, the previous body, the politically independent Hungarian Scientific Research Fund, merged with the much bigger NRDI, and many researchers at the time feared that the decision would open the way to political influence over funding decisions. The president of NRDI has substantial decision-making power over NRDI’s funds—by law, 3% can be directed to anything they want, for example—and personally appoints the members of peer-review committees that approve grants.The current head of NRDI, physicist József Pálinkás, has proved to be a strong advocate for science. Since he took over in 2015, NRDI has created regular grants to encourage basic science research, reward excellence, and support young scientists. Hungary still heavily relies on EU funds to develop its research infrastructure, but Pálinkás next year plans to request a doubling of the national research and innovation budget to more than €520 million. His term ends in 2020, however, and some scientists express concern, in private, that the government will replace him with someone more political.By then, CEU may have started to pull up stakes. In April 2017, the government amended the nation’s higher education law to require, among other things, that CEU have a second campus in New York, its home state, and obtain a bilateral agreement of support between the Hungarian and U.S. governments. In response, CEU rushed to set up classes at Bard College, in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. In the next few weeks, Orbán’s government is due to decide whether CEU has complied with the law and can enroll new students. The university believes it has but is nonetheless making backup plans to move its classes to Vienna, CEU Provost Liviu Matei said last month at the Scholars at Risk Network Global Congress in Berlin. (CEU hopes to retain its research centers in Budapest.) “It will be a very traumatic event,” he added. AP PHOTO/DARKO VOJINOVIC last_img read more

Millionperson US study of genes and health stumbles over including Native American

first_img By Jocelyn KaiserMay. 29, 2019 , 1:40 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Million-person U.S. study of genes and health stumbles over including Native American groups Joseph Yracheta knows the value of genomics-based medicine. As a master’s student, Yracheta, who is of Mexican Indigenous ancestry, studied genetic variants that influence how Native Americans respond to medications. But when it comes to a massive U.S. effort to identify correlations between DNA and health, called All of Us, Yracheta is a skeptic.”I just don’t think tribes should participate in All of Us” because of the lack of clear benefit and a history of mistreatment by researchers and the U.S. government, says Yracheta, who is now studying health disparities among Native Americans as a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. “I don’t think there’s a correct way to do this.” Many tribal leaders and researchers are also hesitant, creating an unexpected obstacle for the ambitious study.Earlier this month, leaders of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, celebrated the 1-year anniversary of the effort, which aims to gather DNA and health records for 1 million volunteers by the end of 2024. They pointed with pride to the study’s diversity: More than 50% of the 143,000 volunteers fully enrolled so far belong to minority groups. They did not mention that Native Americans, who make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, are not formally on board. “I’m very excited and supportive of the research,” says Aaron Payment, tribal chairman for the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Michigan and chair of NIH’s Tribal Advisory Committee. But, he adds, “There is a level of frustration and anger and skepticism.” Formal meetings with tribal nations began this month, and NIH staff members say the discussions will lead to an action plan before the project’s data are released to researchers next winter. But tribal leaders are unhappy that these discussions did not begin sooner, and that Native Americans are informally enrolling in the study in the meantime.Announced by then-President Barack Obama 4 years ago, the All of Us study will make anonymized data widely available so the scientific community can use them again and again in open-ended studies. A similar project in the United Kingdom has had remarkable success.All of Us has partnered with Latino and African American organizations, but efforts to engage the Native American community have faltered. With some 600 tribes to consult and a limited budget, “obviously, this is very complicated,” says Gwynne Jenkins, chief of staff for the All of Us Research Program. But Payment says NIH officials, including NIH Director Francis Collins, seemed “naïve” about past problems that make tribes cautious about participating in research studies.One prominent case involved the Havasupai tribe in Arizona, which sued researchers in 2004 after their DNA samples, gathered for diabetes research, were allegedly used to study schizophrenia and inbreeding without permission from the tribe. “Indian communities were treated as specimens in the past. The research was not done in a culturally appropriate way,” Payment says. The Navajo Nation banned all genetic studies in 2002.Meanwhile, All of Us launched nationwide in May 2018, including in cities such as Phoenix that have large populations of Native Americans. As of mid-February, the study already had DNA samples and health records for more than 1600 volunteers who self-identified as American Indian or Alaska Native and were able to indicate their tribe. That’s 1.5% of participants, close to proportional representation of Native Americans.That worries tribal leaders. In August 2018, a report from an All of Us working group of tribal leaders, health experts, and NIH officials said that data from individual volunteers could lead to findings with implications for an entire tribe. The report also suggested an individual participant from a small tribe might be identifiable in spite of data safeguards. Yracheta and some other indigenous scientists add that participation should enable tribes, not just companies, to benefit if data from Native Americans lead to a promising test or treatment.Some tribes believe they should be able to decide whether their members take part in research. “Not all tribes agree. But it raises questions about whether or not it is appropriate to recruit tribal members off reservation when the tribe is not aware that type of recruitment is going on,” says Nanibaa’ Garrison, a Navajo and a geneticist and bioethicist at the University of Washington in Seattle.The working group noted that tribes should have the power to approve publications on their group, a clear explanation of the role of companies in the study, and an opportunity to bless biological samples before disposal. Native Americans should also be part of a special committee that approves research projects focused on this group, the report concluded.Acting on recommendations from the working group, All of Us plans to add a Native American to its research advisory panel. After gathering more input, NIH will decide later this year whether to include already-gathered Native American data in the database.Formal consultations with tribes will ramp up in June in Reno, Nevada, at the midyear meeting of the National Congress of American Indians, which represents many tribes. By September, NIH expects to release a report that describes “things we can do and things that we can’t do,” Jenkins says. She hopes some tribes will eventually invite All of Us to recruit on their reservations. “My aspiration would be that we’re able to develop those kinds of rich, trusting partnerships.”center_img The All of Us project hasn’t been able to recruit at events like the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) AMANDA VOISARD/MESA7 MEDIA last_img read more