Publishers PressPublishers Printing Compnay LabelPak Division Receives Flexographic Technical Associations Gold Award

first_imgPublishers Press/Publishers Printing Company Label-Pak Division has been awarded the Flexographic Technical Association’s (FTA) Gold Award, as well as the Best of Show Award for Narrow Web Publication for Alpinist Magazine’s “Autumn 2010” cover.The Label-Pak Division was awarded one of six Best of Show Awards given annually. Over 900 submissions were entered for consideration.Other Narrow Web Gold Publication winners include MPI Label Systems’ Bushdoctor Microbe Brew (label) and Labeltronix’s NLN Chocolate Banana Lean Pro Matrix and Eagle Castle 2009 Chardonnay (both labels).The 145-year-old Publishers Press/Publishers Printing Company is based in Louisville, Kentucky. The company currently offers magazine, catalogue and full service commercial printing, distribution, email marketing and label printing.last_img read more

The VW Beetle is officially out of production

first_imgEnlarge ImageIt’s the end of an era — again. Volkswagen Update, July 10: The final Volkswagen Beetle, a coupe clad in Denim Blue paint, rolled off the assembly line in Puebla, Mexico, today. Before the third-generation car departed from this mortal coil, though, we were given the chance to head down yonder Mexico way and assist in the assembly of some of VW’s final Beetles. Head south by one paragraph to read our account of that experience.I step into a production-line-adjacent conference room at the Volkswagen Beetle factory in Puebla, Mexico. The air inside is tinged with the aroma of what seems to be a nearby bathroom leaking its wretchedness into the air conditioning vents. A presentation slide entitled “How will be work” details the day’s schedule upon a projection screen at the other end of the room. I’m ushered around a table along with a handful of US and Canadian media colleagues. We’re given a schedule rundown and safety briefing that lasts a mere 15 minutes, and then we’re directed toward the production floor to help build a home-stretch batch of Volkswagen Beetles. In just a few weeks’ time, VW’s Bug will be swatted.This factory-floor fast-tracking runs in stark contrast to my Volvo S60 production line experience in South Carolina just two months ago. With Volvo, I was put through a half-day’s training to learn how to perform just one task on the line. Today with the Beetle, I’ll be installing front bumper and radiator covers, mounting the right-rear wheel, bolting in the rear suspension and placing the front emblem.I don’t mind the opportunity to be involved in more of the Beetle’s production process, of course. We’re talking about one of history’s most recognized and influential machines. Since the Beetle’s inception in 1938, more than 23 million bugs have crawled out of VW factories the world over, from Germany to Nigeria, Indonesia to Ireland and presently, Mexico. Getting a chance to build some of the final examples of the “People’s Car” is one of those stories I’ll likely tell my grandchildren.Volkswagen Beetle EvolutionEnlarge ImageVolkswagen Beetles rising through eight decades. Manuel Carrillo III/Roadshow Slug bugMy first task is to install the front bumper cover on a Stonewashed Blue Beetle headed to a Chinese customer. Bumper assembly would have been a rather simple process had I been given a crack at more than one car. That’s not in the cards, though, so I go about my duties like a toddler navigating along the Brooklyn Bridge’s railing. Thankfully, I’ve got a supervision safety net of pros standing around me. For these men and women who work the line every day, proper component mounting is a matter of muscle memory. Click together a few electrical connectors, bang on the body panels just right so they snap into place (kind of like you’re playing “punch bug” with the Beetle itself) and six screws later, the little Beetle’s cute face is complete. That’s not the end of my job at this station, however. I still have to install a black plastic panel that sits under the hood ahead of the radiator, which is simply a matter of lining up the component and banging it in. Easier said than done, I soon realize. My infantile banging proves futile, so a line worker helps me by realigning the piece and then popping it into place as effortlessly as your most recent breath. Once that’s complete, the car continues down the line, never for me to see it again.The latter three assembly tasks prove smoother with other Beetles. My toddler fumbling isn’t disruptive enough to make a mess of mounting the right-rear wheel. Nor is installing the rear suspension, which is simply a matter of torquing four bolts on each side and letting the computer validate my worth by lighting up with green OKs. Installing the front VW emblem is actually an automated process, but I get to place one on a Bug’s nose anyway, because why let a good photo op go to waste?2019 Volkswagen Beetle Final AssemblyEnlarge ImageVW Beetles get an inspection under the lights before heading out the factory doors and onto their test drives. Manuel Carrillo III/Roadshow By the numbersSurprisingly, robots perform just 48% of the Beetle’s assembly. The other 52% is by hand. Today’s Beetle, which has slid to become VW’s least popular vehicle in the US, shares its assembly line with Volkswagen of America’s best-seller: the Tiguan compact crossover SUV. This popularity chasm is evident as I stretch my eyes down the production line. About one in every 10 vehicles is a Beetle, and there are moments walking along the floor where nothing but Tiguans flood my sockets.Over the course of three shifts within a 24-hour production day (Monday to Friday and sometimes two shifts on Saturday), 937 new vehicles emerge off the line, 170 to 180 of which are Beetles. In addition, every unit is test-driven. Fun fact: According to surveys distributed by the plant’s human resources department, the test drivers are the factory’s happiest employees.Come on, get happyAfter getting to play on the production line, VW lets me briefly test-drive some Beetles outside the factory. I’m surprised at how heavy the (1998-2011) New Beetle’s steering is, and how it feels sportier to drive than the current (2012-2019) Beetle, which is a comparative snooze fest. I’m most excited to drive the 2003 Beetle Ultima Edicion (Final Edition), the last of the original air-cooled Beetles. The Ultima Edicion is much quieter than any classic Beetle I’ve heretofore experienced. Modern seating makes it categorically comfortable, too, but from there, its modernity slopes into the abyss.The Ultima Edicion has no power steering, but that’s fine, as there’s little weight over its nose. The car’s clutch, brake and gas pedals, however, delineate evolution in reverse. The clutch is as light as any economy car’s third pedal from 2019. The brake pedal trails the clutch’s contemporary ease, but scrubbing speed isn’t terrifying: Unlike with earlier Beetles, you needn’t stomp halfway to the floor before barely stopping in time. Even still, the pedal’s modulation is precision’s distant cousin. Traveling farther back in time, the throttle is straight out of World War II, somehow feeling heavier and clumsier than Beetles I’ve driven from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s.The Ultima Edicion proves more ponderous than I’d expected, but it’s a heartening reminder of an automotive icon whose production has lasted longer than the average human lifespan.Volkswagen Beetle Última EdiciónEnlarge ImageThe 2003 Volkswagen Beetle Ultima Edicion is what I consider to be the ultimate expression of the original, air-cooled Bug. Manuel Carrillo III/Roadshow Is this really goodbye?The Beetle’s demise is the lamentable result of how the world has moved away from the spunky and toward the practical. In its ’60s heyday, the original Beetle checked a slew of boxes for the pragmatic but imaginative American consumer. Today, crossover SUVs speak to buyers padlocked by bottom-line idealism. The current Beetle lacks the cargo space, interior volume and ride height that today’s consumer demands. Consequently, the Beetle is now an unsustainably sluggish-selling lifestyle play. VW delivered roughly 14,000 Beetles in the US last year, according to GoodCarBadCar. That’s a far cry from 423,000 US sales in 1968, according to Euronews.And so, as America and the rest of the world have moved beyond Beetle Mania, so, too, must the Bug’s factory in Puebla. The Beetle’s discontinuation will free up space to build more of VW’s popular Tiguan.While Volkswagen currently has no plans to resurrect the Beetle after manufacturing ends in mid-July, I’m willing to bet money the Bug will return sometime next decade. VW’s new, incredibly limber electric MEB platform can spawn a litter of vehicles as diverse as the ID Buzz Cargo and the ID Buggy. It seemingly wouldn’t take much of a business case or a ton of development money for VW to engineer an electric Beetle off that flexible architecture. As a result, assembling some of the last Beetles really feels like “See ya later,” as opposed to a final goodbye. At least, that’s what I hope.Originally published June 24. Tags 2019 VW Beetle Final Edition review: The last goodbye 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder first drive: A Boxster with way more bite 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe review: Stylish and sure-footed More From Roadshow Share your voicecenter_img Volkswagen Automobiles Convertibles Classic Cars Coupes Hatchbacks 7 Comments Volkswagenlast_img read more

Monsoon Monologues

first_imgCome August and Monsoons shall turn magical in Kolkata, as the city gears up to host the third edition of  Monologues, India’s only solo arts festival. The festival, hosted by Phreedom4Ever, an organisation led by Chaity Ghosh, that envisages cultural excellence, is the brainchild of popular elocutionist and theatre actor Sujoy Prosad Chatterjee. Being the only annual solo arts fiesta in the country, the forum has witnessed performances by stalwarts like Chapal Bhaduri (India’s last living female impersonator in performing arts), Saoli Mitra(the legendary actress and daughter of theatre maestro Shambhu Mitra), Mahabanoo Mody Kotwal, Bijoylakshmi Barman and many others over the last two years. The 2014 edition of Monologues shall kick off on 3 August at Swissotel with a solo by Mita Vashisht, who is an internationally acclaimed film personality. This is the first time that Mita shall present a theatrical performance in Kolkata and her act for the evening is called Weekend, a part of the very famous Teen Ekaant by novelist and activist Nirmal Verma, a noted figure in the Indian literary circles. Sujoy has always brought performances out of proscenium to alternative spaces and this festival endorses that. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Monologues 2014 showcases The Solo Room, the youth- section of the festival, on 9 August at Tantra, The Park as a matinee performance. Infact, Monologues is the only national arts festival that has a special segment dedicated to the youth and the arts. The Solo Room begins with an original dramatic act by Soumya Mukherjee, a very popular youth actor and the founder of M.A.D., a key youth-theatre player in Kolkata. Next on the cards shall be a musical solo by Kabir Chattopadhyay, who will entrance the audience with a whole lot western retro. The final act for the evening is a session of original lyrics and songs by the iconic music composer and vocalist Neel Adhikari. The finale of Monologues 2014 shall be on 10 August at Tollygunge Club. The evening begins with a solo comedy by much-admired media personality Anubhav Pal. What follows is a contemporary dance solo by internationally famous contemporary danseuse Paramita Saha, who shall revisit issues of gender construction through her performance. The crowning act shall be by the legendary Indian theatre personality and activist Usha Ganguly, who shall be premiering her new play Rozana, a monologue inspired by works of Franca Rame and Dario Fo.  Going solo becomes an expression of a trajectory of emotions that sums up life and art. No wonder, this solo arts carnival has become the nation’s delight.last_img read more

Canada Jetlines stages inair protest against lack of airline competition

first_img Share Canada Jetlines stages in-air protest against lack of airline competition << Previous PostNext Post >> Posted by Thursday, July 25, 2019 center_img VANCOUVER — Canada Jetlines is standing its ground against what it says is decreased airline competition by staging a protest – in the sky.Using four planes and 18 skydivers, Jetlines’ airborne protest was staged to rally Canadians, investors and the Competition Bureau around the idea of increased competition and decreased airfares.In an official YouTube video of the publicity stunt, Javier Suarez, Jetlines’ CEO, says, “Flights in Canada are a rip-off because Canada is controlled by two airlines and the Competition Bureau is doing nothing to stop them.”He adds: “We are Jetlines, Canada’s first ultra-low-fare airline and we’re here today to send the duopoly a message in the place they believe they own: the sky.”Skydivers are then seen jumping out of a plane and holding up signs that read, “We want fair airfare now”, “Canada needs more airlines” and “Down with the duopoly.”The video then encourages viewers to go to Jetlines’ website at fightback.jetlines.ca to sign an online petition that the carrier says will be presented to the Canadian Competition Bureau.More news:  Universal enhances popular Harry Potter vacation package with new perksIn an official release, Jetlines writes: “While several airlines have attempted to enter the Canadian market, the duopoly has pushed them out with short-term match-pricing at prices below their avoidable costs…The Competition Bureau is currently investigating WestJet and their subsidiary new airline for ‘predatory pricing’ to undercut new entrants. Under Canada’s competition laws, predatory pricing occurs when an incumbent with market power sets its prices below avoidable costs.”Suarez, who is urging consumers to show their support for more competition, says that Canada is the only developed country without a ULCC due to the fact that two high-cost airlines control approximately 85% of the domestic market.The low-cost carrier (LCC) versus ultra-low cost carrier (ULCC) designation may be a matter of degrees, but Swoop, in the market for more than a year now, certainly bills itself as a ULCC, as does Flair, while Air Canada Rouge is typically positioned as more of a LCC.“We know Canadians are fed up as there are between five and six million passenger trips per year by land over to the U.S. each year to fly on U.S. low-cost carriers, based out of northern U.S. airports, that in many cases only operate from those airports due to the robust Canadian passenger traffic,” he says.More news:  GLP Worldwide introduces first-ever Wellness programsCanada Jetlines is scheduled to launch on Dec. 17 as ‘Canada’s first true Ultra-Low Cost Carrier airline’, with plans to operate flights across Canada to destinations in the U.S., Mexico and the Caribbean with an Airbus A320 fleet. Tags: Canada Jetlines Travelweek Group last_img read more