Building a Custom Video Program

first_imgStack Media relied on a regional freelance network to reach a few hundred thousand viewers per month when it started its integrated video campaigns in 2008.Within two years, a Stack Studios crew had been assembled and was traveling the country filming for sponsors like Gatorade and Nike. They’re now getting upwards of 15 million views per video and generating 60 percent of the company’s revenue.Stack Magazine, the flagship of the larger media group, was established in 2005 as a training and fitness title centered on professional athletes. Video came in 2008 with the launch of the company’s digital network—a “natural extension” of the content they were already producing, according to Nick Palazzo, the company’s co-founder and CEO.Is It For Your Audience?The demographics worked for Stack. The majority of its audience is comprised of 16 to 24-year-old males—among the most active online video viewers, according to several recent reports. Overall, 18 to 24-year-old men and women with regular access to the Internet spend close to 11 hours watching web videos per month, or nearly one-third of their total time online, says Nielsen’s Cross Platform report from the second quarter of this year. A Pew Research survey from this fall indicates that the group is highly engaged, as well, with nearly a quarter of all adult American males sharing videos.All told, comScore has tallied more than 100 million Americans watching video online each day, up 43 percent from 2010.How Do You Make It?Pricing for the content is highly variable, Palazzo says, with the number of shoots being the key determinant. A single session—requiring travel, equipment, venue, lighting, etc. (along with the personnel to manage it all)—can run up to $10,000. On the low end, a shoot can be arranged for around $1,500. It’s up to the advertiser.The same goes for concept. The project is usually handed off to Stack right from the start, but sponsors can play a larger role.“Sometimes they can be very involved in storyboarding, bringing the concept to life and providing assets,” Palazzo says. In Stack’s case, those “assets” are usually famous athletes, but they can be products, venues, signage, memorabilia, logos, uniforms or anything else they want included.The bigger the asset, the bigger the response. Timing plays a role, but the golden-rule for luring readers to the newsstand applies to attracting viewers online: recognition.“What really drives traffic and engagement is getting the biggest star possible,” Palazzo says.How Do You Sell It?Palazzo estimates that as much as 85 percent of Stack’s content is now video-based, so naturally it’s their lead story to tell potential advertisers. From there it’s a matter of selling the complete distribution and media package.“It’s hard to sell just straight video. You have to package it with other media assets that you already have—that’s really the most important thing,” he says. “In a lot of what we do, you’ll get the video content, the distribution across our platforms, and media—banner and print—all together in one package. It’s much more efficient to buy everything rather than just piecing it out. We make it an offer they can’t refuse.”Integrated Sales Still Difficult To Do With AgenciesIn a divided print and digital world, Stack can run into difficulties trying to manage a deal across the multiple ad agencies running those respective arms. Whenever possible, Palazzo will try to deal directly with the company.“It’s sometimes hard to do integrated ad sales if they have separate agencies for digital and print,” Palazzo says. “One of the most important things to focus on is working directly with the client. They’re going to be the ones that have the ability to do multiplatform deals, as well as the foresight and knowledge base to help make a video program successful.”How Do You Measure It?Stack’s integrated video campaigns don’t feature any product links or buy options—they’re straight branding enterprises—so measuring success can be a challenge. In the absence of conversions, Palazzo relies on engagement metrics like video plays and average time spent with the video to let him know how they performed.“If you get someone to watch a minute or minute-and-a-half of video, that’s a pretty valuable impression,” he says. “If you can get them to click-through, then great, that’s something you can quantify. But that’s not the key metric that we focus on.”last_img read more

Bombay High Court to Nestle FSSAI Retest Maggi Samples Stock Up Marginally

first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Friday asked Nestle India and the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) to retest Maggi samples, raising hopes of some relief for the popular noodles maker. “Both the parties may consider retesting the fourth part of Maggi samples in 5 labs that both agree to,” CNBC-TV18 quoted the court as saying.In its argument, Nestle had told the court that it “had retained 750 crates of Maggi noodles.”Nestle India share was trading at Rs 6,325, up almost Rs 24, or 0.26%, at 3 pm on Friday at the Bombay Stock Exchange.On 5 June, the food safety regulator had ordered Nestle India to recall all available stocks of Maggi noodles after finding harmful levels of lead and monosodium glutamate (MSG) in tested samples.The Maharashtra State FDA had said that it “cannot consent to re-testing the samples retained by Nestle as it is apprehensive that the samples could be doctored.”The company had filed a case in the court challenging the ban imposed by the FSSAI on its flagship brand Maggi.Recently, the court has allowed the company to export Maggi noodles, currently banned in several states in the country.The next hearing of the case will be on 3 August.Following a ban on its popular Maggi noodles, Nestle India has witnessed its first quarterly loss in 17 years.The company posted a loss of Rs 64.4 crore in the June 2015 quarter compared to a profit of Rs 288 crore in the same period last year.Experts believe that issues related to Maggi noodles recall and ban are likely to be settled in the coming three to six months.last_img read more

ICC 2019 World Cup Lungi Ngidi ruled out of match against India

first_imgThe Proteas have been dubbed as ‘chokers’ for repeatedly failing to perform on the stage of major ICC tournaments. This time around, they were not looked upon as one of the favourites. The sudden retirement of AB de Villiers last year denied them the services of their most dynamic limited-overs player.However, the return to form of Hashim Amla in the practice match and the continuing success of Quinton de Kock gave the Proteas hope of producing a better effort this time than expected. Unfortunately for the Faf du Plessis-led team, while de Kock has failed to convert his good starts into big scores, Amla is yet to get an opportunity as he was forced to leave the field very early on in his innings.The bowlers have also disappointed by allowing both the teams they bowled to in the first two games to score over 300 runs. With Ngidi now also out of the third game of the tournament for Proteas, it’s an uphill task for them to stay in the hunt for the title. Ngidi won’t play against India due to injuryTwitter/ICCIf two losses in two matches are not bad enough, South Africa are now faced with another major problem. One of their key pacemen, Lungi Ngidi, has been declared unavailable for the team’s third match of the World Cup, against Indian on June 5.Ngidi suffered a hamstring problem during his team’s game match against Bangladesh at The Oval. This forced him to leave the field after having bowled just four overs in the game. South Africa were already plagued by injuries with Dale Steyn unable to play the first two matches and still not certain to take part in the fixture against India. On top of that, Hashim Amla suffered a blow to the head during the opening game of the tournament against England which caused him to retire hurt immediately and then sit out of the match against Bangladesh.Dangerous times for SAIf Steyn doesn’t recover and Amla too is unable to get back in the playing XI, South Africa’s campaign, already looking very unsteady, would be in danger of completely going off the rails.last_img read more

Allinclusive pioneer Club Med now going allin with Groups business

first_img TORONTO — In seven years Club Med’s Groups business has tripled out of the Canadian market.Not only that, the Club Med team dedicated to Group sales has also doubled in the past few years.Last night’s Meetings & Events by Club Med reception, presented with partner Air Transat in Toronto, was hosted by one of those new additions to the Club Med Groups team, Lori de Montmorency.For several months now Montmorency has served as Club Med’s MICE BDM based in Toronto, dedicated to Club Med’s MICE sales for English Canada.And in 2016 the department launched a new brand identity, to better translate how Club Med can offer different types of group experiences. More details are at en.meetings-events-clubmed.ca/.Already the all-inclusive pioneer, Club Med has gone all-in on Groups business too. Why? “The MICE (meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions) market is very important for Club Med as we are able to offer experiences for corporate clients that want to bring their team at destination,” says Melanie St-Germain, Groups Sales Manager for Meetings & Events by Club Med.More news:  Flights cancelled as British Airways hit by computer problemShe added: “Companies value more and more their colleagues working with them. Companies are looking to share a message through corporative events (eg. trainings, meetings), reinforce ties through team buildings activities (creative, social, active) and bring together their teams through pleasant moments including entertainment and dinners.“In one location, Club Med can provide all those aspects thanks to our MICE and leisure offer at destination.”Agents can position Club Med’s product “as a great asset for the company to create immediate return on investment, in regards to employee loyalty,” she adds.The MICE market is a big piece of Groups business but it’s not the only piece and St-Germain wants agents to know that plenty of Groups opportunities exist beyond MICE. “Welcoming groups at Club Med is very diversified and not only for MICE groups,” says St-Germain. Examples include training & educational programs, product launches, sports programs (eg. ski, golf, scuba diving, tennis, etc.) and, of course, family reunions and destinations weddings.More news:  CIE Tours launches first-ever River Cruise CollectionClub Med resorts have Groups coordinators on site and together with the property’s G.O.s, “we are able to offer tailored experiences to different types of groups and provide specific atmospheres in different parts of the resort.”Club Med’s dedicated Groups team in Canada can organize and coordinate the program for the client, from activities to booking and setting up meetings rooms, to dining logistics, private dining and excursions, plus flights, she adds. << Previous PostNext Post >> Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Share Travelweek Group center_img Tags: Club Med Posted by All-inclusive pioneer Club Med now going all-in with Groups businesslast_img read more