Letters to the Editor for Monday, Jan. 13

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionFind hope in others sharing my viewsI have come to realize that the pro and anti-Trumpers are well ensconced in their opinions and I try to respect that. For myself, who is practically daily in awe of the things he and his administration say and do (and I mean negative awe), it is hard to believe that society has evolved to this point.That being said, my purpose for writing it to thank other letter writers, columnists, cartoonists and late-night TV show hosts for helping me feel there are others out there who share my viewpoint.It gives me hope that America will continue to be as great as it always has been.Ethel RobinsonSchoharieGrateful for work on Niskayuna Co-opWe attended the Niskayuna Co-op membership meeting on Jan. 7 and have been co-op members for over 20 years. Despite challenges, it is clear that the co-op is moving in a positive direction. It is also clear that change is hard, especially for employees and customers who have been doing things the same way for decades.However, we believe that the changes create opportunities to grow the co-op brand to reach new audiences.We were impressed with the work of co-presidents Sarah Bilofsky and Sunny Lee, as well as the entire board, and left with the feeling the co-op is in good hands.They understand the role of the market and its importance to the community.The interim general manager has moved quickly to learn about us and make positive changes. The meeting allowed for a critical conversation with a broad audience and allowed everyone to feel heard.Thank you to the staff for making the Niskayuna Co-op the wonderful institution it is and thank you to the board for working so hard to keep it thriving for years to come.Bill and Jennifer WilkersonNiskayunaFEMA individual flood aid is limitedWhile I share The Gazette’s concerns for the victims of the 2019 Halloween flood (Jan. 8, “FEMA must help flood victims”), it is misleading to expect FEMA to make people whole again, even if individual assistance was approved. Readers should be aware that individual assistance grants are very limited in scope.The maximum amount of assistance is under $35,000. The average grant is less than $8,000.The program is meant to cover short-term rent and utilities and some uninsured damage. For people who do not have flood insurance, additional assistance from the federal government is only available in the form of a Small Business Association loan.The federal law establishing the individual assistance program was not designed to make people whole or to rebuild ruined houses. And typical homeowner’s insurance policies exclude damages from floods. Only a flood insurance policy, either through FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program or through a private insurance company, will cover flood damages. Flood insurance is expensive, but much less expensive than rebuilding your home after a flood.Tax dollars should not be used to repair buildings, only to see them flooded again. Government assistance should instead be used to help elevate or buy out flood-prone homes so that damages are not repeated, and further taxpayer expenditures are not needed.Homeowners and renters must take responsibility for their own risk by purchasing a flood insurance policy.To find out if you are in or near a flood zone, google “FEMA Map Service Center.”William NechamenSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.last_img read more

Ripley County Boys Basketball Tourney-Still A Go Tonight

first_imgFirst Round of the Boys’ Varsity Basketball, Ripley County Tournament is on for Wednesday Night.Game 1-6:00 PM:      Batesville vs Milan.Game 2-Following:    JCD vs South Ripley.We do advise the public that poor weather conditions have persisted this week, and everyone should use their own good judgement whether to travel to the games.  You may choose to stay home and listen to the games on WRBI. WRBI’s Countdown To Tipoff will be at 5:30.last_img

MSOC : Cribley’s speed aids Syracuse offense

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 13, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Rachel: rnmarcus@syr.edu Ted Cribley’s run at the start of overtime against American on Sunday perfectly describes his style of play: fast.After Syracuse forward Dan Summers dribbled the ball to the halfway line, Cribley, a junior midfielder for SU, came racing downfield.He took a pass from Summers and saw a gap — a chance to give SU the win. He sprinted past the AU players into the open field, but his shot went into the hands of Eagles’ goalkeeper Matt Makowski.Cribley didn’t score the goal, but that display and movement on the play has become typical of what the Orange has seen from him in his first season with SU.‘His best thing that he does is how he gets in behind defenders,’ fellow midfielder Mark Brode said. ‘You could play it over the top, and if he gets in a foot race with the defender, he’s going to get it.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCribley’s speed and dribbling are crucial elements in SU’s (2-2, 0-0 Big East) offensive attack this season. A junior college transfer from nearby Herkimer County Community College, Cribley joins the Orange as a junior. He brings quickness and an ability to see the open field that lead to more goal-scoring opportunities for SU.Originally from England, Cribley came stateside and spent two years at Herkimer. It was there that the midfielder stood out as arguably one of the team’s best players. SU head coach Ian McIntyre took notice, and now Cribley has started every game for the Orange so far in 2011.He’s tied for fourth in the Big East in assists with two, which accounts for nearly half of SU’s five goals scored. But he’s quick to credit his teammates for being in the right place at the right time.‘We’ve all sort of settled in,’ Cribley said. ‘We know what Mac wants us to play.’As Cribley continues to adjust to Syracuse, he and the team expect shot attempts like his chance in overtime against American to end in goals. The Orange offense has struggled to convert its scoring opportunities. Three of SU’s four wins under McIntyre have come on free kicks in overtime.The team wants that to change.Thus, expectations are high for Cribley following two standout seasons at Herkimer. To McIntyre, Cribley has one of the bigger roles on the team. That’s to be expected, especially after McIntyre called getting a player of Cribley’s caliber a ‘coup.’Cribley’s ability to both distribute the ball and run and dribble with it downfield have paid dividends not seen in the box score. He’s given McIntyre a reason to be pleased with his decision to invest in an experienced newcomer to the team.‘We feel like we have some attacking threats, and he’s one of them,’ McIntyre said. ‘And when he’s running a play, he’s a real handful.’The Orange has already matched its win total from last season with two victories just four games into the year. It’s also managed five goals in the process, which is a modest but noticeable improvement from 2010.It’s a change that can be attributed to many of the newcomers, Cribley included.And his downfield action against American last weekend proved that his play will keep the opposing defenses on their toes and the SU offense in games. In addition to his two assists, he’s also tallied six shots.Despite a save by Makowski on Sunday, Cribley knows that everything leading up to the final shot was right. It just didn’t go in.Another time, he said, it could be different.‘In those situations, you try to just get it on target at least and hope the keeper isn’t set properly,’ Cribley said. ‘Most times it will go. That time it didn’t.’But Cribley’s speed should keep providing him with opportunities to score. He constantly whizzes past his opponents and leaves them gasping for air.Brode only had to think briefly before deciding who would win a foot race between the team’s two fastest players, Cribley and freshman defender Skylar Thomas.His conclusion: Cribley would win.‘He’s a really dangerous player,’ Brode said. ‘He’s probably the fastest kid on our team. He brings a lot of speed on the outside, and he’s good with the ball. Ted’s been real important.’rnmarcus@syr.educenter_img Commentslast_img read more

Spurs’ Patty Mills donating entire salary from NBA restart to BLM organizations

first_img“I’m playing in Orlando because I don’t want to leave any money on the table that could be going directly to Black communities.”Good on you, @Patty_Mills. pic.twitter.com/7knxfIrJLt— San Antonio Spurs (@spurs) July 8, 2020An 11-year veteran, Mills is averaging a career-best 11.7 points and is now the second-leading scorer on San Antonio’s roster after LaMarcus Aldridge announced a month ago he will miss the rest of the season following right shoulder surgery. The Spurs had the Western Conference’s 12th-best record at 27-36 when the season was halted in mid-March, good enough to be one of 22 teams invited to Orlando to finish the season. They have made the playoffs every year since the 1997-98 season but sit four games back of the eighth-place Grizzlies with eight games scheduled. MORE: Spurs’ DeRozan unhappy with NBA’s bubble rules”I’m proud to say I’m taking every cent earned from these eight games that we’re playing, which for me will turn out to be $1,017,818.54, and donating that directly back to the Black Lives Matter Australia, Black Deaths in Custody and to a recent campaign that’s called We Got You, dedicated to ending racism in sport in Australia,” Mills said in a video posted by the Spurs. Spurs guard Patty Mills announced Wednesday that he will donate all the money he earns during the NBA’s restart in Florida to Black Lives Matter organizations.Mills, who is from Australia, becomes the second NBA player in three days to announce he will be donating the remainder of his 2019-20 salary to social justice causes. The Lakers’ Dwight Howard pledged approximately $700,000 to Breathe Again on Monday. last_img read more