One Take Greg Wells On Adele Canada HipHop Music Memoirs

first_img One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch: One Take With Greg Wells one-take-greg-wells-adele-canada-hip-hop-music-memoirs Email One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch One Take With Marian Hill One Take With Demo Taped Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch One Take With Halestorm In this episode, Wells tells us which is his go-to instrument for writing a song, his favorite hip-hop album of all time and his favorite Canadian artist. He also reveals the one word he would use to describe Adele and Keith Urban as well as what he thinks is the best produced album of all time.  Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton Watch: One Take With MØ Watch One Take With Superfruit One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto Watch: One Take With Dorothy Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Amber Rubarth One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch: One Take With Dorothy One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With The Mrs Watch One Take With Marian Hill One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch: One Take With MØ Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch: One Take With Lights One Take With Le Butcherettes Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton News Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take: Greg Wells On Adele, Canada, Hip-Hop & Music Memoirs One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Jul 26, 2018 – 5:17 pm One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Khalid Prev Next One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch: One Take With Lights One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch One Take With Nick Cannoncenter_img One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch: One Take With Lights Watch: One Take With Dorothy Facebook One Take One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Logic One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch One Take With Julia Michaels Twitter Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Khalid One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton One Take With Le Butcherettes One Take With The Mrs Watch One Take With Logic One Take With Demo Taped One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Le Butcherettes Watch One Take With Little Big Town Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal Watch One Take With Superfruit Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With The Mrs The GRAMMY-winning producer reveals what he thinks of Adele, his favorite Canadian artist, the best musical memoir he’s read, and moreJennifer VelezGRAMMYs Jul 26, 2018 – 5:15 pm GRAMMY-winner Greg Wells wears many hats as a producer, musician, mix engineer and songwriter. He has worked with GRAMMY winners like Adele and Pharrell Williams and on The Greatest Showman movie. Recently, he sat down to play a round of One Take, GRAMMY.com’s rapid-fire question game that challenges your favorite artists to see how many questions about life, music and everything in between they can answer in just 60 seconds. Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Demo Taped Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch: One Take With MØ Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch One Take With Julia Michaels Watch One Take With Logic Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch: One Take With Khalid Watch One Take With Julia Michaels One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch One Take With Marian Hill Watch One Take With Superfruit Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”last_img read more

Why are Shah Rukh Khans movies getting flopped lately

first_imgWhy Shah Rukh Khan’s movies are getting flopped at box office.Varinder ChawlaShah Rukh Khan is one of the biggest superstars of India, who not only has a huge fan base in the country, but across the globe. However, the actor’s movies have not been doing well at the box office lately.Although Shah Rukh’s films still take huge opening at the box office, none of the recent movies could create the desired impact at the commercial circuits. In fact, most of his recent films ended up being flop at the box office.His last two films – Jab Harry Met Sejal and Zero were highly anticipated movies as those had strong star cast and were helmed by popular directors. But both the movies failed to impress the audience, and hence, flopped at the box office.Trade analyst, Sumit Kadel in a video put forward a number of reasons that according to him, are responsible for Shah Rukh’s movies going flop at the box office.First, Shah Rukh has been doing high budget experimental movies like Fan and Zero. He feels that such experimental films die at the box office after making a limited earning of around Rs 80 to 100 crore. Sumit said that as SRK has invested too much money on such films, these ended up being flop despite making decent collection. He stated that Fan had a budget of around Rs 90 crore, and Zero was made on Rs 150 crore.Secondly, Sumit feels that the audience is now tired of seeing Shah Rukh in romantic roles. Zero was expected to present him in a different light, but he was again seen romancing Anushka Sharma’s character in the film. He feels the audience does not want to see him in the same old romantic avatar anymore.Thirdly, the trade expert said that wrong kind of directors are being given the responsibility to direct wrong kind of films. He said that most of Shah Rukh recent movies have been directed by people, who are not known for making such films. They have been taken out of their comfort zone in a bid to direct the superstar’s films. Sumit said that light-comedy directors like Maneesh Sharma was given a complex film like Fan, Aanand L Rai was given Zero, which was opposite to his usual genre. Shah Rukh Khan as Bauua Singh in ZeroTwitterThe trade analyst then spoke about the release dates of the King Khan’s films. SRK’s movies are not being released on good dates, and are often clashing with other big movies, he said.Sumit further said that the audience’s faith in Shah Rukh’s movies has come down after repeated flops. His films witness massive occupancy because of his huge fan base, but the collection subsides after the weekend as the word of mouth remains bad.Talking about the corrective measures the superstar should take, Sumit said that he should start choosing more commercial and universally appealing movies. And even if SRK wants to do experimental films, he should restrict the cost of production to around Rs 40 crore.Sumit also said that it is high time that Shah Rukh works with big film-makers like Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Rajkumar Hirani and Karan Johar.last_img read more

Why Musicals For The Deaf Are Not A Contradiction

first_img – / 5Please Sir, I want some more.Even for people unfamiliar with the story of Oliver Twist, many still know that famous line.Now, imagine someone saying it in sign language.Recently, Theatre Under the Stars gave a performance of the musical Oliver!. But on this night at the Hobby Center, there aren’t just actors onstage. On the floor to the right, in the dimly-lit performance hall, there’s another spotlight on two people dressed in black and gray, acting out the scenes in American Sign Language, or ASL.A musical for people who can’t hear? It may seem contradictory at first.“Deaf people get music,” says the Hobby Center’s Audience Services Manager Judi Stallings. “Just because they can’t hear everything, it doesn’t mean they don’t understand it. They get the rhythm, the flow, the fluidity of the music.”The Hobby Center is partnering with TUTS and the University of Houston’s American Sign Language Interpreting program to make the arts more accessible to Houston’s deaf community. It’s the first time they’re trying something like this.Brittany Best is majoring in American Sign Language Interpreting at UH and is one of the seven seniors responsible for translating the lines of the 58 characters in Oliver!. It’s pretty demanding.“I’ve got to know the actors’ lines; I’ve got to know my interpretation of those lines; and I’ve got to know what they’re doing onstage, because I’m not looking at them,” Best says. “So I’ve got to know all three and keep in line with the music (and) the tempo of the song.”The preparation began weeks in advance.“They engaged in complete script analysis and, along with me, worked through the script line, by line, by line,” says Sharon Hill, Program Coordinator and faculty member for UH’s ASLI program. She’s been instrumental in getting the project started.ASL is its own language and doesn’t have the same sentence structure as English, which means that translating word for word doesn’t always work. That’s also why subtitles aren’t usually ideal when trying to translate dialogue and music.“As Long as He Needs Me is really a challenging song,” says UH senior and ASL interpreter Barae Frizzel. “I almost spent a day just trying to study that piece. (There are) no signs that you can match to it. It’s more of a feeling and emotion that you have to connect with your audience.”When the lights come up at the end of the show, some people up front are waving their hands in the air. (Think jazz hands, but with more excitement.) That’s the deaf version of applause.Kristina Rodriguez, another student who was signing in the performance, has a unique experience with sign language. Both her parents are deaf and she grew up speaking ASL. This was her mom’s first time to a TUTS show.When she was asked what it was like to see her daughter in a live performance.Kristina translated the question and answer: “I’ve never seen my daughter act that way and have so much expression on her face. It was really exciting to watch. I’m just really happy to see her here.”It was also the first time for Robyn Brittan, another member of the deaf community.Sharon Hill translated her comment: “I see, as a deaf person, that I have access in my language. I miss not one piece of the show.”Stallings says this is a test-run to see if it’s something the Hobby Center can begin to offer more often as part of their accessibility initiative they began this year.“People that I know in the deaf community have assured me, ‘Don’t leave me out just because you think I can’t hear the music,’” she says. “There’s still something there for them.” 00:00 /04:01 Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more