Valverde Barcelona are fired up for success

first_imgErnesto Valverde believes his team is extra motivated to win the Champions League, as they bid to end their barren run since 2015.The Spanish Champions were dumped out of the competition in the Quarter-final stage by Roma but Valverde thinks they have the right mindset to enjoy European success once again.“We would like to win this competition, and surely this feeling is being felt by other teams too,” he told a pre-match press conference.”Teams like Atletico Madrid, Valencia, Manchester City and Real Madrid all have the same desire, yet I like that there is an extra motivation to win the Champions League this year.”Many pundits have tipped Barca to win the tie PSV, however, Valverde is wary of their attacking talents.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“They are the Dutch champions and are used to taking the initiative,” he said.”I don’t see them changing that. Most teams want to maintain their style. They will want to attack and we are going to have to defend well against them.”We try to play the same way every game and we will try to do the same again tomorrow.”They have some very talented wingers, especially on the left. They have some very good full-backs as well, and we have to deal with that regardless of who plays for us.”last_img read more

Essex County Sheriffs Department Partners With Middlesex Sheriffs Office To Complete Interactive Training

first_imgMIDDLETON, MA — 87 members of the Essex County Sheriff’s Department (ECSD) have completed an interactive firearms training organized in conjunction with the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office (MSO), Sheriffs Kevin F. Coppinger and Peter J. Koutoujian announced this week.The training was held on the MSO’s Mobile Training Center (MTC), a specialized trailer that allows officers to practice their responses to critical incidents. MSO officers who operate the MTC can offer unique scenarios for each user to test their firearm, communication and de-escalation skills.“We are proud to share this resource with our law enforcement colleagues at ECSD. Our agencies regularly participate in trainings together, from our Crisis Intervention Training program to continuing education opportunities for staff, but this represents a new avenue for partnership,” said Sheriff Koutoujian. “This training allows officers to work through real life scenarios and practice their responses to a serious incident, all while receiving constructive feedback from ECSD instructors and MSO officers.”The MTC was stationed at the Middleton House of Correction from April 22 – May 3. ECSD staff practiced scenarios specifically tailored for the environments that deputies operate in, such as construction details which may involve a traffic encounter and inmate transportation.“Providing the most advanced training to our correctional officers is a priority of our department. We continually strive to provide high quality, situational training to our officers. Sharing this interactive training platform is an example of how Sheriffs’ Departments in the Commonwealth collaborate for the benefit of public safety,” said Sheriff Kevin Coppinger.In 2018, 19 police departments were trained through the MTC. So far this year, nine agencies – including the Essex County Sheriff’s Department – have utilized the MTC for at least one week of training.Photo L to R: ECSD Special Sheriff William Gerke, MSO Firearms Instructors Officers Frank Reid, Chris Hardy, Ret. Sgt. Don Cook, ECSD Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger with ECSD Firearms Instructors Sgt. Jim Comeau, Security Investigator Jason Frampton, Security Investigator John Zaccari, Capt. Shelley Ehlers, Capt. Tom Cote, Assistant Superintendent/Director of Training Christine Arsenault.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMiddlesex Sheriff’s Office Receives State Grant For Popular Youth Summer CampIn “Police Log”Attorney General Awards Middlesex Sheriff’s Office A Healthy Summer Youth Jobs GrantIn “Police Log”51 Wilmington Students Graduate From Middlesex Sheriff’s Youth Public Safety AcademyIn “Government”last_img read more

The best small SUVs and crossovers for the money

first_img 2019 Porsche Macan S: As lovely as ever 24 Photos 78 Photos Land Rover Range Rover VelarStarting at $49,950, the 2019 Velar is clearly not cheap. But this compact SUV feels far more expensive than it really is. Its minimalist design inside and out makes it one of the most aesthetically pleasing vehicles on the road.The Velar delivers a comfortable, quiet ride with reasonable athleticism and more off-road ability than any owner will ever ask of it. More From Roadshow SUVs Crossovers 62 Photos 2018 Nissan Kicks: Appreciating the unconventional Subaru CrosstrekThe 2019 Subaru Crosstrek starts at $21,895, offers standard all-wheel drive, and hey — you can even get it with a six-speed manual transmission. Equipped with the continuously variable transmission, the Crosstrek is pretty darn efficient, returning 27 miles per gallon city and 33 mpg highway.The 2019 Crosstrek now comes with automatic emergency braking on all models, as well as adaptive cruise control, lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard across all trims. 2019 Honda CR-V is one of our favorite compact crossovers 12 Photos 24 Photos Subaru ForesterThe Forester still has enough of its tall-wagon DNA to make it enjoyable to drive, yet it offers all the practicality of an SUV, starting at $24,295.Subaru’s EyeSight driver-assistance package is among the best available in this category, and while the rest of the Forester’s in-cabin tech is a little tame, support for both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay mostly mitigates that.A number of 2019 model-year upgrades make the Forester an even better offering in the compact SUV space.Originally published March 21. 2018 Subaru Crosstrek: Just as good as before, only better The 2019 Subaru Crosstrek is rugged, practical and affordable 50 Photos Enlarge Image Honda Boy howdy, do American consumers love their crossovers and SUVs. And because many are looking to utility vehicles in place of compact sedans and hatchbacks, we’ve seen a big rise in the number of pint-size SUVs on offer.To that end, we’ve put together a list of some of our favorite small-ish crossovers and SUVs. From cheap-and-cheerful compacts to luxury and performance offerings, these are the best small utility vehicles on sale in America today.. And these days, compact offerings seem to be all the rage. To that end, we’ve gathered up some of our favorite small utility vehicles that hit all the sweet spots, from utility, efficiency, luxury and yes, even sportiness. Subaru Meet Roadshow’s long-term 2019 Volvo XC40 Mazda CX-5Starting at under $25,000, the Mazda CX-5 offers tons of style, inside and out.A 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine offers 187 horsepower and 186 pound-feet of torque. Whether in all-wheel or front-wheel-drive guise, the Mazda serves up genuine driving fun and excitement behind the wheel.The post-refresh model is now considerably quieter and better riding than earlier models, with blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert standard across all trim lines.  Volvo XC40A brand-new Volvo for $32,000? Sign us up.The XC40 doesn’t scrimp on kit, even though it’s the cheapest Volvo, coming standard with the Sensus Connect infotainment system and the always-great “Thor’s Hammer” LED headlights.Not only does it look good, the XC40 drives really well, too. Fuel economy isn’t the best, but life is full of tradeoffs.  Mazda CX-3The smaller Mazda CX-3 can be had starting at $20,390. While it’s been updated for 2019, Mazda didn’t mess with the good stuff. The same 2.0-liter engine is under the hood as last year, though power and torque have increased just slightly.The rear glass is thicker, which should result in a quieter cabin. The LED taillights out back get a new design as well. Blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert are standard on all trims. The base Sport model can be had with an i-ActivSense Package, including such active driving aids as full-range adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and rain-sensing wipers.center_img Volkswagen Tiguan is bigger all around, but still compact 2019 Mazda CX-5 Diesel review: Was it really worth the wait? Volkswagen TiguanThe Volkswagen Tiguan is softer than it used to be, but it’s also much more spacious, comfortable and quiet than the previous generation. The new look is bold, but also very classic VW.VW’s Car-Net and Digital Cockpit are basically scaled-down versions of the amazing Audi tech we’ve been raving about for years.A rare thing among compact SUVs, the Tiggy can actually be optioned with a third row of seats. 2019 Mazda CX-3 is brimming with personality 33 Photos Nissan KicksStarting at just under $18,000, the Nissan Kicks is a lot of car for the money, and can be had with a truly outstanding Bose Personal Plus audio system.The Kicks is a great, honest little crossover — and it’s not too shabby to drive, either.Aside from moderate noise over bumps, this budget crossover is a lot quieter than many of its competitors. 42 Photos Honda CR-VThe latest-generation Honda CR-V features a lot more style, has a roomier backseat, boats class-leading cargo space, and starts at a reasonable $25,000.A strong engine lineup includes a 2.4-liter naturally aspirated base engine with 180 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque, or a punchy 1.5-liter turbo with 190 horses and 179 pound-feet. The good thing about the turbocharged engine is that peak torque is available from just 2,000 rpm.The CR-V provides a well-damped ride quality, while also being competent through corners. 2019 Subaru Ascent review 24 Photos Porsche MacanThe Porsche Macan does the small-sporty-SUV thing better than pretty much any of its rivals. It’s handsome, spacious and super fun to drive. Plus, that Porsche badge ain’t for nothin’ — the Macan will outdrive any other sporty crossover on the road today.For 2019, the Macan S got a brand-new turbocharged V6 engine, and some slightly refreshed style. It’s an SUV we’d love to drive every day — and on some of our favorite roads, too. 2019 Mazda CX-5 adds premium style with new Signature trim Tags Share your voice 7 Comments 22 Photos Range Rover Velar SVAutobiography packs 550 hp, high-end trimmings 2019 Subaru Forester: Welcome improvements for an already solid SUV Land Rover Honda Mazda Nissan Porsche Subaru Volkswagen Volvolast_img read more

Indigenous icon Morales losing grounds among native people

first_imgPeople sit in front of signs against Bolivian President Evo Morales` bid for re-election in 2019 in La Paz. Photo: ReutersIn 12 years as president of South America’s poorest country, Evo Morales has accomplished many of the goals he set forth when he became the first indigenous person to lead Bolivia.The 58-year-old leftist and former coca farmer has presided over an economy that has grown by an annual average of 4.6 percent since he took office, more than twice the rate for all of Latin America.After nationalizing the country’s bounteous natural gas reserves, he pursued market-friendly economic policies and invested export revenue in social programs that helped lift more than two million people, nearly a fifth of the population, from poverty.With a new constitution in 2009, he even changed the name of the country from the Republic of Bolivia to the Plurinational State of Bolivia, reflecting diverse ethnicities that for centuries had felt like second-class citizens.For Bolivia’s more than 4 million indigenous people, support for Morales appeared to pay off. The poverty rate dropped from 59.9 percent in 2006 to 36.4 percent last year. Access for indigenous communities to electricity, sewerage and water service all grew, according to the World Bank. Here in Charagua, in the country’s remote southern lowlands, Guarani people recently dissolved the local municipality and launched Bolivia’s first experiment in autonomous government. The move, made possible by the new constitution, is meant to replace distant, homogenous rule with policies tailored to the local, indigenous reality. Yet here and across Bolivia, indigenous people are increasingly turning against Evo, as the poncho-wearing Morales is known. The dissatisfaction – over everything from proposed development of indigenous lands to his successful gambit to end term limits – is marring what had been widespread acclaim for a leader emblematic to first peoples’ movements worldwide.   “His way of thinking and his actions aren’t indigenous,” said Gualberto Cusi, a former judge and ethnic Aymara, an influential Andean tribe from which Morales himself also hails. Cusi, who was barred from the Constitutional Court by Congress last year after disagreements with the government, now leads a group of indigenous dissidents. Many Aymara have flourished under Morales’ rule. Building upon a long history selling textiles along Lake Titicaca, they now thrive in commerce, like importing Chinese electronics they sell as far afield as the Amazon rainforest.  But even they are increasingly fed up. “He should go,” said Joaquin Quispe, a cook whose Aymara family moved from Bolivia’s interior to El Alto, a city where a swelling indigenous influx in recent years made it outgrow nearby La Paz, the country’s administrative center.What particularly bothers some are moves by Morales, using supporters in Congress and the judiciary, to consolidate power.Although his own 2009 constitution set a limit of two five-year terms, Morales asked voters in a 2016 referendum to let him run again in 2019.When they said no, Morales convinced the Constitutional Court to let him anyway. The court, consisting of jurists nominated by Congressional allies, ruled that term limits are a violation of his “human rights.” Morales’ spokeswoman, Gisela Lopez, declined to make the president available for an interview and didn’t respond to requests for comment for this story. A close ally, former Senate President Jose “Gringo” Gonzales, said Morales hasn’t abandoned indigenous peoples, but has evolved as president to represent and work with everyone.  “He can sit for one minute with a businessman and the next with a worker,” said Gonzales, who stepped down from the Senate last week for undisclosed reasons. “He still has the humility and simplicity that were highlighted when he took office.”Morales is now the longest consecutively serving head of state in the Americas. He is the sole leader remaining from a wave of leftists, including Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil, who dominated Latin American politics early this century.His name, which graces schools, stadiums, and cultural centers, is increasingly voiced in street protests and scrawled in graffiti. All over the divided country, “Bolivia said no!” sprayings compete with ”Evo Yes!” signs painted by supporters of his party, Movement Toward Socialism, or MAS.Morales won’t go before voters again until late next year. And the opposition remains fragmented, meaning no other leader in Bolivia as yet compares in political stature.Still, in a July poll commissioned by newspaper Pagina Siete, support for the president among likely voters fell to 27 percent from 31 percent last November. A survey by pollster Ipsos this week showed a similar level of support, at 29 percent of likely voters, with a six-point drop over the past year in his approval rating, now at 43 percent.Over the past eight months, Reuters traveled across Bolivia to better understand the waning support for the president among indigenous peoples. From his native Altiplano, the high, arid plateau home to the Aymara, to gas-rich lowlands, where the government has authorized extraction on indigenous lands, many native Bolivians say they no longer feel represented by Morales.“A NEW ERA”For many, the years following Morales’s 2005 election were marked by jubilation and hope.Before his official inauguration in January 2006, Aymara “maestros,” or ritual leaders, held their own ceremony at the pre-Incan site of Tiwanaku, west of La Paz. Morales, in a traditional red tunic, climbed the Akapana pyramid, where shamans presided over a fire ritual and presented him with a staff symbolizing his right to lead the assembled tribes.“Today begins a new era for the native peoples of the world,” Morales said. Tens of thousands of indigenous activists, along with native delegations from as far away as Chile and the United States, cheered.Within months, he began asserting his plans to “decolonize” Bolivia and give locals more voice in government and a greater share of national wealth. On May 1, Labor Day, he ordered troops to occupy natural gas fields and nationalized all hydrocarbons.“The time has come, the longed-for day, a historic day for Bolivia to retake absolute control of our natural resources,” he said in a speech while surrounded by soldiers at an oil field operated by Petroleo Brasileiro, or Petrobras, the Brazilian energy company.Morales began renegotiating energy contracts for a bigger share of the profits, a move that ultimately many companies agreed to. The negotiations earned him plaudits from supporters and boosted government revenues at a time when gas prices were soaring.With the windfalls, Morales enacted measures including school vouchers for kids and pensions for workers who had never held formal employment.For the day-to-day business of governance, Morales appointed women, indigenous peoples and labor leaders to his cabinet. He embraced grass-roots organizations and forged a so-called “Unity Pact,” comprising leaders of Andean, lowland and Amazon tribes. Together, they helped draft the new constitution, approved by 60 percent of Bolivians in a 2009 referendum. That year, in a landslide, Morales won a second term.Tensions with indigenous groups first emerged in 2011.  Enjoying what by then was steadily improving economic growth, Morales proposed a 300-kilometer road through the Isiboro Secure Indigenous Territory, or Tipnis, a Jamaica-sized refuge in the Amazon. The highway, Morales argued, was necessary to bring basic services to remote tribes.But native groups and environmentalists were enraged.The road, they argued, more likely would facilitate drug trafficking, illegal logging and other unwanted activity. Protesters marched for more than a month, during which police and demonstrators clashed in clouds of tear gas and flurries of rubber bullets. “When Evo took office we thought indigenous people would never have to march again,” said Adolfo Chavez, a native Tacana and former president of The Confederation of Indigenous People of Bolivia, or Cidob, a grouping of 34 lowland tribes.The marching succeeded, at least for a time. That September, Morales halted work on the road for further study. But relations with some native groups were damaged.Two major indigenous rights organizations, Cidob and The National Council of Ayllus and Markas of Qullasuyu, left the Unity Pact. Since then, the split has widened into divisions that fall along political lines, not rivalries among Bolivia’s three dozen ethnicities.Soon, government supporters began to pressure both groups, using MAS loyalists to stage what some members described as coups within the organizations. Politics and loyalty to Morales began to matter more than the indigenous cause, they said.  Cidob leader Chavez was voted out in 2012. Chavez, who left Bolivia and now lives in Peru, says he was a victim of political persecution for leading the Tipnis demonstrations. Pedro Vare, Cidob’s current leader, in local media has continued to back Morales and criticize the protesters. Reuters was unable to reach Vare for an interview.One rainy evening in December 2013, MAS activists broke down the door of the two-story La Paz headquarters of Conamaq, as the other indigenous rights group is known. Once inside, they forced members, some of whom were visiting La Paz from remote regions and living there during their stay, to leave.“We had nowhere to go,” recalls Cristobal Salles, an Aymara and Quechua speaker who was a Conamaq councilman and now farms potatoes.  Dissent at both groups vanished.Hilarion Mamani, a 41-year-old  Quechua who led the Conamaq takeover, told Reuters a purge had been necessary. Using a charge long wielded against opponents by some leftists in Latin America, Mamani said previous leaders were acting on behalf of “North American imperialists.” Now, he added, “there are no divisions.”That’s because most of the previous members went on to form  dissident indigenous groups. Those groups have campaigned to enforce presidential term limits and against renewed efforts to build the Tipnis road and other projects on native lands.  In 2014, Morales began his sustained effort to stay in power.Despite the constitutional limit of two terms, Morales argued that his first administration shouldn’t be counted because he had been elected under a previous constitution. In the Constitutional Court, by then composed mostly of judges nominated by allies of Morales in Congress, he found a sympathetic audience.Except for one justice – Cusi, the fellow Aymara who at that time sat on the court. Cusi sought a strict interpretation of the charter and argued against another term. But the other judges prevailed. Morales ran for re-election and, with 60 percent of the vote, won a third term starting in January 2015. Before long, relations with native groups grew worse still.  In February 2015, a government comptroller discovered a $10 million shortfall in a state fund for indigenous projects, finding records of initiatives that had been funded, but never carried out.  Two of Morales’ former rural development ministers were convicted of misusing public funds and served brief jail terms.Some onetime Morales supporters were outraged. “It seems corruption has been institutionalized,” Edwin Prada, a lawyer and former advisor to Conamaq, said in an interview.Morales in public comments has said the fund was poorly run. Reuters couldn’t reach either of the two former ministers for comment.That year, natural gas prices fell from a peak in 2014. The country’s economy, while still healthier than that of many neighbors, cooled.Criticism of Morales and his party grew.   “LORD KING EVO MORALES”In  March 2015, residents of El Alto, formerly a bastion of Morales support, handed MAS its first big electoral defeat. They voted out the city’s MAS mayor, who had polarized local voters because of municipal spending, and elected Soledad Chapeton, an Aymara from a center-right party who became the city’s first female mayor.Morales, meanwhile, kept working to prolong his own mandate – first through the failed referendum and then through another plea to the Constitutional Court. By last year, the court was firmly allied with Morales.After opposing other government initiatives, Cusi, the Aymara judge, was impeached by the Senate. The day before the May 2017 ruling, Cusi donned chains in front of government headquarters and scoffed at what he considered his foregone ouster. “Lord King Evo Morales,” he said before television cameras, “order your puppet senators to condemn me.”  Officially, Cusi was accused of failing to fulfill duties. But many government critics called his removal political.“They found a pretext to oust me,” Cusi told Reuters. Now the head of a Conamaq breakaway group, Cusi recently announced he would seek the office of attorney general.With the go-ahead to pursue a fourth term, Morales stoked even more ire.Early last year, students at the Public University of El Alto, a bastion of political activism, began demonstrating for more educational funding. The ruling on term limits sparked further discontent, fueling demonstrations that continued into this year.In a clash with police, one student died. Police said the student, Jonathan Quispe, was killed when students hurled marbles. University officials said he was shot by police. Reuters couldn’t independently determine what led to Quispe’s death.Last August, Congress approved a project to restart the Tipnis highway. Other construction projects are also drawing fire.At a cost to taxpayers of $7 million, Morales last year inaugurated a three-wing museum with large modern windows in Orinoca, the remote Altiplano town where he grew up herding llamas. The “Museum of the Democratic and Cultural Revolution” tells Bolivia’s recent history through Morales’ own achievements.This month, Morales presided over the opening of a new 28-floor presidential palace in La Paz. He calls the $34 million building “the big house of the people.”The projects, some critics say, are further proof Morales lost touch. “He always said he would consult the people,” said Salles, the former Conamaq leader. “Now he doesn’t.”In Charagua, the lowland Guarani region, residents are struggling with autonomy. One recent afternoon, locals at a school auditorium hashed through problems now plaguing their experiment, the first of three autonomous regions approved by voters recently.Charagua, roughly the size of Panama, in the 1930s was the site of successful resistance against Paraguayan invaders who sought to seize area gas reserves. Despite having gas, however, Charagua remains poor, accessible only by dirt roads. The regional budget, financed in part by La Paz, remains the roughly $4.5 million it was before autonomy. But locals say the national government has all but abandoned them otherwise.“We are worse than before,” said one resident who identified himself as Victor before storming out of the auditorium. “I want a recall on this autonomy.”Reuters was unable to reach the Morales cabinet official in charge of indigenous autonomy.Guarani leaders there said they, too, are unhappy. Ramiro Lucas, a 44-year-old leader of a southern portion of Charagua, lamented that the region recently had to halt school breakfasts because money was needed for health centers. “Now we have land, but what good is that if we don’t have resources?” he told Reuters.last_img

Why Musicals For The Deaf Are Not A Contradiction

first_img – / 5Please Sir, I want some more.Even for people unfamiliar with the story of Oliver Twist, many still know that famous line.Now, imagine someone saying it in sign language.Recently, Theatre Under the Stars gave a performance of the musical Oliver!. But on this night at the Hobby Center, there aren’t just actors onstage. On the floor to the right, in the dimly-lit performance hall, there’s another spotlight on two people dressed in black and gray, acting out the scenes in American Sign Language, or ASL.A musical for people who can’t hear? It may seem contradictory at first.“Deaf people get music,” says the Hobby Center’s Audience Services Manager Judi Stallings. “Just because they can’t hear everything, it doesn’t mean they don’t understand it. They get the rhythm, the flow, the fluidity of the music.”The Hobby Center is partnering with TUTS and the University of Houston’s American Sign Language Interpreting program to make the arts more accessible to Houston’s deaf community. It’s the first time they’re trying something like this.Brittany Best is majoring in American Sign Language Interpreting at UH and is one of the seven seniors responsible for translating the lines of the 58 characters in Oliver!. It’s pretty demanding.“I’ve got to know the actors’ lines; I’ve got to know my interpretation of those lines; and I’ve got to know what they’re doing onstage, because I’m not looking at them,” Best says. “So I’ve got to know all three and keep in line with the music (and) the tempo of the song.”The preparation began weeks in advance.“They engaged in complete script analysis and, along with me, worked through the script line, by line, by line,” says Sharon Hill, Program Coordinator and faculty member for UH’s ASLI program. She’s been instrumental in getting the project started.ASL is its own language and doesn’t have the same sentence structure as English, which means that translating word for word doesn’t always work. That’s also why subtitles aren’t usually ideal when trying to translate dialogue and music.“As Long as He Needs Me is really a challenging song,” says UH senior and ASL interpreter Barae Frizzel. “I almost spent a day just trying to study that piece. (There are) no signs that you can match to it. It’s more of a feeling and emotion that you have to connect with your audience.”When the lights come up at the end of the show, some people up front are waving their hands in the air. (Think jazz hands, but with more excitement.) That’s the deaf version of applause.Kristina Rodriguez, another student who was signing in the performance, has a unique experience with sign language. Both her parents are deaf and she grew up speaking ASL. This was her mom’s first time to a TUTS show.When she was asked what it was like to see her daughter in a live performance.Kristina translated the question and answer: “I’ve never seen my daughter act that way and have so much expression on her face. It was really exciting to watch. I’m just really happy to see her here.”It was also the first time for Robyn Brittan, another member of the deaf community.Sharon Hill translated her comment: “I see, as a deaf person, that I have access in my language. I miss not one piece of the show.”Stallings says this is a test-run to see if it’s something the Hobby Center can begin to offer more often as part of their accessibility initiative they began this year.“People that I know in the deaf community have assured me, ‘Don’t leave me out just because you think I can’t hear the music,’” she says. “There’s still something there for them.” 00:00 /04:01 Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more

Final Results

first_imgStory Links Men 400 Meter Dash=================================================================== Name Year School Finals H#=================================================================== 1 Anthony Crandon SR Louisville 48.30 1 2 Aiden Hazzard Unattached 48.42 1 3 Joshua Hill SR Unattached 48.60 1 4 Naaman Outing SO Houston 49.66 1 5 Antoine Adams Unattached 50.84 2 6 Patrick Thomas SR Unattached 50.88 1 7 Ethan Meyer JR Millikin 51.81 2 Women 200 Meter Dash======================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind H#======================================================================== 1 Chelsea Francis SR South Florida 23.76 1.8 1 2 Payge Side FR Houston 24.20 1.8 1 3 Cecila Tamayo-Garza FR Houston 24.30 2.3 2 4 Chika Iwuamadi FR SMU 24.57 1.8 1 5 Ashton Woods SO SMU 24.94 1.8 1 6 L’t’sha Fahie SR Unattached 25.50 1.8 1 7 Madison Pyle SR SMU 25.78 2.3 2 8 Brooke Shepherd FR SMU 25.91 2.3 2 9 Kamille Robinzine JR Houston 26.04 2.3 3 10 Shaneylix Davila FR South Florida 26.28 2.3 3 11 Kiara Miles SO South Florida 26.38 2.3 3 12 Javonia Ellis SO South Florida 26.44 2.3 2 13 Olivia Mars FR SMU 27.31 2.3 3 14 Cassie Ackemann SO SMU 27.93 2.3 3 Men 4×100 Meter Relay================================================================ School Finals ================================================================ 1 Houston 38.82 1) John Lewis III SR 2) Brandon Taylor FR 3) Jordan Booker FR 4) Travis Collins JR 2 South Florida 41.09 1) Maurice Nock JR 2) Luke Lafferty JR 3) Taquon Terry JR 4) Justin Peter SO Men 3000 Meter Run================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Emmanuel Cheboson SO Louisville 8:39.55 2 Daniel Fleace JR Louisville 8:43.41 3 Cameron Stephens SO Louisville 8:43.95 4 Gabe Armijo SO Houston 9:17.95 5 Matthew Neeley SO South Florida 9:50.48 Women 1500 Meter Run=================================================================== Name Year School Finals H#=================================================================== 1 Hannah Miller JR SMU 4:27.47 1 2 Svenja Ojstersek SR SMU 4:28.02 1 3 Aurilla Wilson SR Louisville 4:28.76 1 4 Mary Claire Neal SO Rice 4:50.76 1 5 Hannah Bablak JR Rice 4:53.34 1 6 Sarah Glover SO Rice 4:54.01 1 7 Yaranel Abreu SR South Florida 4:57.54 1 8 Robin Montemayor SR SMU 4:57.78 2 9 Alivia Bienz FR South Florida 4:58.61 1 10 Claire Farnsworth SR South Florida 4:59.66 1 11 Mackenzie Dixon SO Millikin 5:03.02 2 12 Maddy Eck FR Millikin 5:07.22 2 13 Annie Allmark SO South Florida 5:08.82 1 14 Ruby Watson FR Rice 5:13.78 1 15 Nicole Mitchell SR Rice 5:14.14 2 16 Keschel Hernandez SR South Florida 5:14.31 2 17 Gillian Card SO Millikin 5:25.77 2 18 Claire Weers SO Millikin 5:29.16 2 19 Olivia Heatley SR SMU 6:45.78 2 Men Discus Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 James Lee Unattached 55.35m 181-07 2 Triston Gibbons FR Houston 54.67m 179-04 3 Nick Hicks FR Rice 48.74m 159-11 4 Hunter Hummel FR South Florida 47.70m 156-06 5 Elian Ahmar FR Rice 46.38m 152-02 6 Kenneth Sessums SR Houston 46.32m 152-00 7 Johnny Howell FR UNAT-Houston 38.70m 127-00 8 Kemond Murray SO Millikin 37.20m 122-00 Women 800 Meter Run================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Aurilla Wilson SR Louisville 2:16.08 2 Morgan Powers JR Millikin 2:21.79 3 Michaela Hedderman JR South Florida 2:22.46 4 Hawa Wague SO Houston 2:25.73 5 Stephanie Halow FR Rice 2:27.57 6 Megan Derouen SO Houston 2:29.06 7 Joycelyn VanAntwerp SO Millikin 2:29.19 8 Victoria Mineo FR Millikin 2:33.05 9 Eryn Renison FR Millikin 2:39.86 10 Anne Longman FR Millikin 2:46.00 11 Hannah Barker SO Houston 2:46.26 Men High Jump========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Anthony McRoberts JR Louisville 2.11m 6-11.00 won jumpoff – 2.11 2 Colin George SR Houston 2.08m 6-09.75 3 Luke Nichols FR Louisville 2.03m 6-08.00 4 Skyler VanMeter JR Louisville 1.93m 6-04.00 5 Michael Johnson FR Louisville 1.93m 6-04.00 Men Long Jump=============================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind =============================================================================== 1 Marcus Jegede SR Louisville 7.53m 2.7 24-08.50 2 Taquon Terry JR South Florida 7.11m 3.0 23-04.00 3 Luke Lafferty JR South Florida 6.99m 1.9 22-11.25 4 Kenneth Pree FR Houston 6.94m 2.0 22-09.25 5 Clay Moss SO Louisville 6.50m 3.9 21-04.00 6 Dominic McClinton SO Louisville 6.48m 4.6 21-03.25 7 Max Rogers FR Millikin 6.29m 3.4 20-07.75 8 Joshua Keyes SR Unattached 5.86m 1.6 19-02.75 Women 3000 Meter Run================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Ivine Chemutai SO Louisville 9:59.40 2 Jahnavi Schneider SR UNAT-Houston 10:10.28 3 Bailey Beery JR Louisville 10:20.89 4 Robin Montemayor SR SMU 10:50.10 5 Madeline Castleberry SO Houston 10:55.62 6 Rania Samhouri SO South Florida 11:04.24 7 Emely Morgado SR Houston 11:31.72 8 Brianna Rischar SR South Florida 11:50.08 Women 100 Meter Dash======================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind H#========================================================================Finals 1 Ashley Seymour FR Houston 11.64 2.2 1 2 Chelsea Francis SR South Florida 11.74 2.2 1 3 Sharnae Alston SO Louisville 11.77 2.2 1 4 Ariele Adams SO Houston 11.91 1.2 2 5 Angel Amadi SO Louisville 11.92 2.2 1 6 Jada Massie SR South Florida 11.95 2.2 1 7 Jokenia Bond SO Louisville 12.03 2.2 1 8 L’t’sha Fahie SR Unattached 12.15 1.2 2 9 Phedenia George-Mosbey JR Houston 12.56 1.2 2 10 Bryanna Hernandez SO SMU 12.84 1.2 2 11 Olivia Mars FR SMU 13.19 1.2 2 Women 400 Meter Dash=================================================================== Name Year School Finals H#=================================================================== 1 TyNia Gaither SR Adidas 54.20 1 2 Maya Fabri SO South Florida 55.42 1 3 Shenica Bazile JR South Florida 56.86 1 4 Destiny Fairley SO South Florida 57.39 1 5 Madison Pyle SR SMU 58.73 1 6 Brooke Shepherd FR SMU 58.81 2 7 Mackenzie Dixon SO Millikin 59.66 2 8 Erin Lukens SR Millikin 59.87 1 9 Brianna Niebrugge SO Millikin 1:00.37 2 10 Marissa Topolski SR Rice 1:01.88 1 11 Shaneylix Davila FR South Florida 1:02.38 2 12 Hollie Johnson FR Millikin 1:03.66 2 13 Akilah Ware FR Millikin 1:05.41 2 Men 110 Meter Hurdles===================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind===================================================================== 1 Martice Moore SR Louisville 14.53 1.4 2 Tyler Ettel SO Louisville 14.90 1.4 3 Michael Johnson FR Louisville 15.22 1.4 4 Dalton Collins JR Millikin 15.82 1.4 5 Corbett Fong FR Rice 16.51 1.4 6 Clay Moss SO Louisville 16.93 1.4 Women 4×400 Meter Relay=================================================================== School Finals H#=================================================================== 1 Houston 3:43.18 1 1) Payge Side FR 2) Mihoko Nara SR 3) Erin Derrow NA 4) Jazmyn Tilford-Rutherford JR 2 SMU 3:46.71 1 1) Ashton Woods SO 2) Chika Iwuamadi FR 3) Brooke Shepherd FR 4) Madison Pyle SR 3 South Florida 3:49.97 1 1) Shenica Bazile JR 2) Maya Fabri SO 3) Destiny Fairley SO 4) Kristin Lubeskie FR 4 Houston ‘B’ 3:55.36 2 5 Louisville 3:57.70 1 1) Kelsey Heyward JR 2) Brooke Raglin SO 3) Sharnae Alston SO 4) Kayla Alexander FR 6 Millikin 4:07.84 1 1) Erin Lukens SR 2) Hollie Johnson FR 3) Mackenzie Dixon SO 4) Brianna Niebrugge SO 7 South Florida ‘B’ 4:23.98 2 1) Michaela Hedderman JR 2) Annie Allmark SO 3) Yaranel Abreu SR 4) Claire Farnsworth SR Women Hammer Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Halee Hudson JR Louisville 55.73m 182-10 2 Mikaila Martin SR Houston 55.18m 181-00 3 Carsen Cassell SR Louisville 54.97m 180-04 4 Dheryl Batts SR Rice 52.30m 171-07 5 Priscilla Adejokun SO Houston 51.27m 168-02 6 Julie Perez FR Rice 50.80m 166-08 7 Ashley Wilson SR South Florida 49.30m 161-09 8 Calista Ukeh FR Rice 43.96m 144-03 9 Daniella Murchison SR SMU 40.99m 134-06 10 Stephanie Oliver SO Millikin 40.25m 132-01 11 Alexis Obermeyer SR Millikin 37.97m 124-07 12 Dareth Douglass SO SMU 37.48m 122-11 13 Kennedy Godsey SR SMU 37.03m 121-06 14 Hannah Hill FR UNAT-Houston 36.23m 118-10 15 Anna Gambol SO Millikin 36.07m 118-04 Men Javelin Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Charlie Card-Childers SR Rice 63.71m 209-00 2 Dane Stolsig JR Rice 60.11m 197-02 3 Corbett Fong FR Rice 55.38m 181-08 4 Brandon Cua FR Rice 54.34m 178-03 5 James McNaney NA UNAT-Rice 53.64m 176-00 6 Brendan Thompson Unattached 45.35m 148-09 7 Austin Weber FR Rice 35.27m 115-08 Print Friendly Version Women Discus Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Gianna Gaul JR Louisville 46.49m 152-06 2 Lilli Popovich SR Louisville 45.82m 150-04 3 Hailey Pollard FR Houston 45.33m 148-09 4 Nora Monie SR UNAT-Houston 43.66m 143-03 5 Ryan Pickering FR Houston 43.64m 143-02 6 Priscilla Adejokun SO Houston 41.58m 136-05 7 Kimberly Haines FR Houston 41.16m 135-00 8 Malaya Pistokache SO Houston 37.40m 122-08 9 Dareth Douglass SO SMU 37.16m 121-11 10 Daniella Murchison SR SMU 35.80m 117-05 11 Julie Perez FR Rice 34.22m 112-03 12 Alexis Obermeyer SR Millikin 31.22m 102-05 13 Stephanie Oliver SO Millikin 30.62m 100-05 14 Anna Gambol SO Millikin 30.09m 98-09 — Chiko Ugwunze FR UNAT-Houston FOUL Women 4×100 Meter Relay================================================================ School Finals ================================================================ 1 Houston 44.77 1) Justice Henderson JR 2) Essance Sample SO 3) Samiyah Samuels JR 4) Ariele Adams SO 2 Louisville 45.37 1) Sharnae Alston SO 2) Angel Amadi SO 3) Jokenia Bond SO 4) Brooke Raglin SO 3 South Florida 45.96 1) Shenica Bazile JR 2) Chelsea Francis SR 3) Jada Massie SR 4) Maya Fabri SO 4 South Florida ‘B’ 55.87 1) Javonia Ellis SO 2) Kiara Miles SO 3) Karen Lyvers FR 4) Shaneylix Davila FR Licensed to Flash Results, Inc. – Contractor License HY-TEK’s Meet Manager Houston Spring Break Invitational University of Houston – 3/14/2019 Tom Tellez Track Results Women 100 Meter Hurdles======================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind H#======================================================================== 1 Naomi Taylor SO Houston 12.84 4.5 1 2 Sydney Hill SR Louisville 13.86 4.5 1 3 Kayla Alexander FR Louisville 13.88 4.5 1 4 Kelsey Heyward JR Louisville 14.32 4.5 1 5 Shaneylix Davila FR South Florida 14.49 1.2 3 6 Kiara Miles SO South Florida 14.67 2.9 2 7 Ashton Woods SO SMU 14.76 4.5 1 8 Jacy Sparks JR SMU 14.98 2.9 2 9 Hawa Wague SO Houston 15.00 2.9 2 10 Holly Hankenson SR Louisville 15.00 4.5 1 11 Reagan Luce FR Houston 15.43 2.9 2 12 Anna Larsson JR Houston 15.69 1.2 3 13 Cassie Leal SR Houston 16.08 4.5 1 14 Olivia Witt FR SMU 16.46 2.9 2 Men 400 Meter Hurdles================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Amere Lattin SR Houston 49.82 2 Quivell Jordan SO Houston 50.87 3 Kameron Jones FR Louisville 54.82 4 Justin Peter SO South Florida 56.82 5 Didah Hall SO South Florida 57.62 6 Dalton Collins JR Millikin 59.73 Women Shot Put========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Nora Monie SR UNAT-Houston 15.49m 50-10.00 2 Rashida Harris JR Louisville 15.17m 49-09.25 3 Victoria Farley SO Louisville 13.55m 44-05.50 4 Daniella Murchison SR SMU 13.40m 43-11.75 5 Mikaila Martin SR Houston 12.83m 42-01.25 6 Kennedy Godsey SR SMU 12.54m 41-01.75 7 Hailey Pollard FR Houston 12.23m 40-01.50 8 Giulia Sportoletti JR Rice 11.73m 38-06.00 9 Zinedine Russell JR Rice 11.47m 37-07.75 10 Taylor Reeves FR Houston 11.05m 36-03.00 11 Bethan Burley FR SMU 10.55m 34-07.50 12 Hannah Hill FR UNAT-Houston 10.45m 34-03.50 13 Cassie Leal SR Houston 9.92m 32-06.50 14 Anna Larsson JR Houston 9.73m 31-11.25 15 Reagan Luce FR Houston 9.26m 30-04.75 16 Olivia Witt FR SMU 8.99m 29-06.00 17 Kelsey Mussio SO Houston 8.54m 28-00.25 — Chiko Ugwunze FR UNAT-Houston FOUL — Priscilla Adejokun SO Houston FOUL Men High Jump jumpoff========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Anthony McRoberts JR Louisville 2.11m 6-11.00 — Colin George SR Houston NH Men 4×400 Meter Relay================================================================ School Finals ================================================================ 1 Houston 3:10.86 1) Brandon Adams FR 2) Trumaine Jefferson SR 3) Frederick Lewis FR 4) Naaman Outing SO 2 Louisville 3:16.42 1) Anthony Crandon SR 2) Kameron Jones FR 3) Tyler Ettel SO 4) Martice Moore SR 3 South Florida 3:20.00 1) Maurice Nock JR 2) Randall Ceneus SR 3) Luke Lafferty JR 4) Taquon Terry JR 4 Millikin 3:27.55 1) Jackson Allen SO 2) Dalton Collins JR 3) Ben Kuxmann FR 4) Ethan Meyer JR 5 Louisville ‘B’ 3:28.89 1) Noah McBride FR 2) Donald McClinton SO 3) Dwayne Depp SO 4) Sterling Warner FR 6 South Florida ‘B’ 3:30.63 1) Evan Babatz JR 2) Danny Ferro FR 3) Yohance Haynes JR 4) Derwin Moultrie JR — Houston ‘C’ DNF Men 200 Meter Dash======================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind H#======================================================================== 1 Edward Sumler IV FR Houston 20.95 2.1 1 2 Jordan Booker FR Houston 21.09 3.2 2 3 Jermaine Holt JR Houston 21.12 2.1 1 4 Frederick Lewis FR Houston 21.20 3.2 2 5 Nathan Farinha Unattached 21.26 2.1 1 6 Trenton McDonald SO Houston 21.56 2.1 1 7 Jordan Landburg SR Elite Perf 21.63 2.1 1 8 Noah McBride FR Louisville 21.76 2.1 1 9 Perez Knowles Unattached 21.98 5.2 3 10 Joshua Hill SR Unattached 22.02 2.1 1 11 Patrick Thomas SR Unattached 22.13 5.2 3 12 Javon Rawlins Unattached 22.31 3.2 2 13 Jackson Allen SO Millikin 22.37 3.2 2 14 Joshua Shelmire Unattached 22.62 3.2 2 15 Jameson Strachan Unattached 22.73 3.2 2 16 Didah Hall SO South Florida 22.92 5.2 3 17 Lee’Vonte Kelley FR Millikin 23.01 5.2 3 18 Clay Moss SO Louisville 23.10 5.2 3 19 Justin Peter SO South Florida 23.62 5.2 3 20 Aiden Hazzard Unattached 23.91 3.2 2 — Dominic Smith SR Unattached DNF 5.2 3 Men Triple Jump=============================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind =============================================================================== 1 Anthony McRoberts JR Louisville 15.27m 3.1 50-01.25 2 Errol Ennis SR South Florida 15.21m 2.7 49-11.00 3 Melvin Briley FR South Florida 14.57m 2.7 47-09.75 4 Patrick McCoy SR Rice 14.01m 1.9 45-11.75 — Max Rogers FR Millikin FOUL — Ethan Meyer JR Millikin FOUL Women Javelin Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Brittany Krug SO South Florida 46.20m 151-07 2 Emma Ison SO Louisville 42.90m 140-09 3 Kimberly Haines FR Houston 36.13m 118-06 4 Bethan Burley FR SMU 36.09m 118-05 5 Holly Hankenson SR Louisville 31.94m 104-09 6 Kiara Miles SO South Florida 31.90m 104-08 7 Anna Gambol SO Millikin 30.70m 100-09 8 Zinedine Russell JR Rice 26.78m 87-10 9 Stephanie Oliver SO Millikin 24.51m 80-05 — Olivia Witt FR SMU FOUL Men 100 Meter Dash======================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind H#======================================================================== 1 Brandon Taylor FR Houston 10.34 2.3 1 2 Errol Nolen Unattached 10.38 2.3 1 3 Maurice Nock JR South Florida 10.46 2.3 1 4 Sterling Warner FR Louisville 10.55 1.2 2 5 Terence Ware FR Houston 10.59 2.3 1 6 Travis Collins JR Houston 10.61 2.3 1 10.604 6 Nathan Farinha Unattached 10.61 2.3 1 10.604 8 Donald McClinton SO Louisville 10.68 2.3 1 9 Jordan Landburg SR Elite Perf 10.75 1.2 2 10 Lateef Birks Jr. FR Houston 10.81 +0.0 3 11 Javon Rawlins Unattached 10.88 1.2 2 12 Jackson Allen SO Millikin 11.11 1.2 2 13 Joshua Shelmire Unattached 11.28 1.2 2 14 Lee’Vonte Kelley FR Millikin 11.35 +0.0 3 15 Joshua Keyes SR Unattached 11.40 +0.0 3 Women Long Jump=============================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind =============================================================================== 1 Renate Van Tonder JR Louisville 6.30m 4.2 20-08.00 2 Alexis Gibbons JR Louisville 6.22m 3.8 20-05.00 3 Phedenia George-Mosbey JR Houston 5.92m 2.2 19-05.25 4 Camille Little JR Rice 5.80m 1.4 19-00.50 5 Javonia Ellis SO South Florida 5.71m 1.4 18-09.00 6 Teesa Mpagi SO Rice 5.51m 3.0 18-01.00 7 Reagan Luce FR Houston 5.47m 3.0 17-11.50 8 Nika Karpenko SO Louisville 5.47m 5.0 17-11.50 9 Kaytlyn Gill SR South Florida 5.38m 4.3 17-08.00 10 Cassie Leal SR Houston 4.92m 1.4 16-01.75 11 Mycah Taylor FR Houston 4.91m 2.2 16-01.50 12 Brianna Niebrugge SO Millikin 4.72m 3.0 15-06.00 Men 800 Meter Run=================================================================== Name Year School Finals H#=================================================================== 1 Yohance Haynes JR South Florida 1:53.34 1 2 Derwin Moultrie JR South Florida 1:55.71 1 3 Albert Kosgei JR Louisville 1:56.05 1 4 Zion Smith FR Houston 1:56.64 1 5 Ben Kuxmann FR Millikin 1:58.65 2 6 Blake Contreras SR Houston 1:58.68 1 7 Isaac Pearce JR UNAT-Houston 1:59.59 1 8 Tyler Keranen Unattached 2:00.47 1 9 TJ Weglarz SO Millikin 2:03.47 2 10 Taijhan Nelson SO Millikin 2:04.90 2 11 Eli King FR Millikin 2:12.04 2 12 Austin Bicknell FR Millikin 2:12.06 2 13 Garrett Jones FR Millikin 2:13.97 2 — Alex Lynch SO Louisville DNF 1 Men 1500 Meter Run================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Danny Ferro FR South Florida 3:57.33 2 Albert Kosgei JR Louisville 3:57.93 3 Blake Contreras SR Houston 3:58.40 4 Nicholas Fernandes SO Houston 4:04.19 5 Alex Lynch SO Louisville 4:04.69 6 Jemal Wote FR Houston 4:08.31 7 Evan Babatz JR South Florida 4:15.69 8 Oscar Garcia Unattached 4:21.98 9 Austin Bicknell FR Millikin 4:24.12 10 Ricky Esparza SO Millikin 4:26.75 Men Pole Vault========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Jordan Yamoah Unattached 5.20m 17-00.75 2 Shota Enoki Unattached 5.05m 16-06.75 3 Hiroaki Yonehara Unattached 4.90m 16-00.75 4 Charlie Card-Childers SR Rice 4.90m 16-00.75 5 Ben Percefull SO Houston 4.90m 16-00.75 6 Mitchell Mueller SR South Florida 4.90m 16-00.75 7 Seth Musselman SO South Florida 4.75m 15-07.00 8 Lucas Weaver SO Louisville 4.75m 15-07.00 9 Robert Platt SO Houston 4.45m 14-07.25 — Stone Baker FR South Florida NH — Corbett Fong FR Rice NH — Natan Rivera FR Rice NH — Thomas Pratt FR Rice NH — David Bell SR South Florida NH — Alex Slinkman FR Rice NH Women Pole Vault========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Morgan Zacharias SR Louisville 4.11m 13-05.75 2 Stephanie Lambeth JR South Florida 3.85m 12-07.50 3 Gabriela Leon SO Louisville 3.85m 12-07.50 4 Aliyah Welter FR Louisville 3.70m 12-01.50 5 Kylie Swiekatowski JR Rice 3.70m 12-01.50 6 Kristin Lubeskie FR South Florida 3.40m 11-01.75 — Kennedy Shank SR South Florida NH — Sarah Howe SO Houston NH — Emily Harrison FR Rice NH — Anna Larsson JR Houston NH — Nicole Carroll JR South Florida NH — Olivia Winterkamp SO Houston NH Women 2000 Meter Steeplechase================================================================ Name Year School Finals ================================================================ 1 Abigail Wright SR Louisville 7:21.64 2 Natalie Goddard SO Rice 7:43.30 3 Loren Goddard SO Rice 7:45.61 4 Caitlin Wosika FR Rice 7:52.34 5 Sage McAdams SO Rice 8:10.13 Men Shot Put========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Felipe Valencia SR Houston 17.91m 58-09.25 2 Triston Gibbons FR Houston 17.58m 57-08.25 3 Cade Richeson SO Louisville 16.99m 55-09.00 4 Elian Ahmar FR Rice 15.74m 51-07.75 5 David Perry SO Houston 14.90m 48-10.75 6 Michael Yow JR Rice 14.39m 47-02.50 7 Johnny Howell FR UNAT-Houston 14.23m 46-08.25 Women Triple Jump=============================================================================== Name Year School Finals Wind =============================================================================== 1 Nicole Iloanya SR SMU 12.96m 1.7 42-06.25 2 Renate Van Tonder JR Louisville 12.52m 3.4 41-01.00 3 Atipa Mabonga JR SMU 12.43m 4.2 40-09.50 4 Nika Karpenko SO Louisville 11.68m 2.3 38-04.00 — Arielle Boone FR South Florida FOUL — Mycah Taylor FR Houston FOUL — Camille Little JR Rice FOUL — Brianna Niebrugge SO Millikin FOUL Men Hammer Throw========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Austin Riddle NA UNAT-Rice 64.44m 211-05 2 Michael Yow JR Rice 58.01m 190-04 3 Nick Hicks FR Rice 55.94m 183-06 4 Bruce Robinson SR South Florida 52.28m 171-06 5 Felipe Valencia SR Houston 51.32m 168-04 6 Austin Weber FR Rice 47.56m 156-00 7 Kemond Murray SO Millikin 40.97m 134-05 8 Kenneth Sessums SR Houston 40.87m 134-01 — Mitchell Kessler JR Louisville FOUL Women High Jump========================================================================== Name Year School Finals ========================================================================== 1 Alivia Ash SO Louisville 1.75m 5-08.75 2 Imani Carmouche SO South Florida 1.70m 5-07.00 3 Cassie Ackemann SO SMU 1.70m 5-07.00 4 KC Nwadei SO Rice 1.65m 5-05.00 5 Olivia Witt FR SMU 1.60m 5-03.00 — Kirby Powers SR South Florida NH last_img read more

COLUMN Juvenile justice reforms will result in brighter futures for troubled teens

first_img A bipartisan plan approved by the Michigan House last week has the potential to dramatically improve the way young people are treated in our state’s legal system.Right now, any 17-year-old who breaks the law in Michigan is required to be processed through the adult legal system, regardless of the severity of the crime. That means high school juniors and seniors – who can’t legally vote, sign a contract or serve on a jury – are charged, tried and even sent to serve in prison alongside adults.Michigan is one of just four states where this law remains, despite all of the research that shows placing 17-year-olds in adult prison hinders their ability to re-enter society and lead successful, productive lives.Teenagers in prison face a greater chance of being sexually assaulted and subjected to other forms of violence. They’re also more likely to attempt suicide.Instead of bringing the full weight of the adult legal system down on 17-year-olds, the solution I support will help them turn their lives around by giving them access to the rehabilitation programs available in the juvenile justice system. These programs are already designed to help young people by focusing on education, career and technical training, and family involvement.Including 17-year-olds in the juvenile system has been shown to reduce recidivism by 34 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control.This plan does nothing to prevent minors who commit heinous crimes from being charged as adults. Prosecutors and judges will continue to have discretion – just like they do right now with other teenagers who commit violent crimes.However, most teenagers who commit a crime in Michigan are first-time, non-violent offenders. They deserve a chance to fix their mistakes and straighten out their lives.In addition to producing better results for Michigan teens, raising the age for juvenile justice in Michigan will save public tax dollars, freeing up funds to be invested in schools, roads and other services critical to Michigan families.Connecticut, Illinois and Massachusetts are among the states that have experienced millions of dollars in savings, decreases in the number of reoffending youth and declines in judicial costs after raising the age of juvenile court jurisdiction to 18.Putting 17-year-olds with non-violent records into adult prisons is harmful to young people, expensive for taxpayers and does absolutely nothing to make our communities safer. I’m pleased to be able to report that change could soon be on the way.###— State Rep. Sarah Lightner is serving her first term in the Michigan House representing residents in portions of Jackson, Lenawee and Eaton counties. 29Apr COLUMN: Juvenile justice reforms will result in brighter futures for troubled teens Categories: Lightner Newslast_img read more