CARICOM not doing enough to support cricket – WICB’s Nanthan

first_imgGEORGETOWN, Guyana (CMC): The Vice-President of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB), Emmanuel Nanthan, says regional governments are not doing enough to support the development of cricket in the region. Nanthan’s declaration comes as the Dave Cameron-led WICB and CARICOM appear to remain at loggerheads over a recommendation calling for the dissolution of the board by a review panel setup by CARICOM and the WICB. The WICB appears to be preparing for a legal battle with CARICOM to resist the recom-mendations of the Review panel by hiring Dominican lawyer Anthony Astaphan. Nanthan is insisting that the problems with West Indies cricket have little to do with WICB’s governance, but a lack of resources from regional governments to fund training. “It costs the WICB about US$1 million to train a cricketer from the Under-15 level to the elite level in international cricket,” said Nanthan, a sports administrator for the past 20 years. “Eighty-seven per cent of all amounts spent by the Windwards and Leewards in age group tournaments is represented by accommodation costs, air and sea travel costs and the cost of meals for players who are away from their homes. No wonder on an annual basis the Windwards and Leewards are always at the bottom of the table in the early rounds of the regional competition.” A recent meeting in Grenada between CARICOM prime ministers and a WICB delegation to discuss the panel’s governance report made little progress except for an agreement for future meetings. WICB’s defiance appears to have been fired-up following a subsequent board meeting in St Lucia, which also discussed the governance report. “Did the academics look into this? Are the nation states encouraging cricket in the communities?” asked Nanthan. “I say all this so you can understand the costs of the opportunity, which you have been offered through the opportunity of the Professional Cricket League.” STATE’S ROLE The WICB vice-president added: “Early education in sports in schools is the responsibility of the State. The responsibility of training to achieve successful performance and results for national teams in regional and international sports is the responsibility of the governments.” Nanthan says the WICB is prepared to make amendments, but stressed that only share-holder territories can legally dissolve the WICB. “We are prepared to make some changes as we did following previous Governance Reports,” he told Kaieteur News in Guyana. “However, on the basis of a corporate review and legal advice, only the shareholders of the WICB can dissolve the company – the WICB. And similarly only shareholders can appoint new directors to the board, whether they are independent or shareholders directors.”last_img read more

Showcasing ‘Miss Monrovia’

first_imgSean Gibson believes he can look at you and design you a brand new outfit in less than ten minutes. That’s some real solid confidence for a 22 year-old fashion entrepreneur with only one 12-piece collection in his portfolio. But, given how quickly those first designs sold out — within 3 weeks via Facebook and Whatsapp — there is no doubt that he’s on to something. According to his friend and business partner Jazlyn Mason, Gibson’s designs are daring to say the least. “He’ll two different prints and make them work as though they were made for each other. So it’s that combination of risky and classy elegance,” she says, that defined his debut collection. This weekend, Gibson is showcasing his second and latest collection under the theme, ‘Miss Monrovia’, The show is expected to display high quality designs made of premium African prints such as Woodin and Vlisco.The show, which is set for Friday, June 5, at the Fuzion bar on 14th Street, Sinkor, is expected to begin at 7:30 pm. According to Sean Gibson, the fashion show is to promote his designs, reaching a wider audience in Liberia and beyond.He added that the new breed of Liberian women, aware of their body type and sexuality, have embarked on a quest for designs that reflect not only their physical beauty. “My designs are for independent women who are often in the driver’s seat because they tend to hold African designs in high esteem.”These new designs, he said, will range from formal to casual.Gibson says he began designing as a hobby for his female friends while attending high school in Ghana and pretty much discovered his talent then and there. “By just looking at people’s body types,” he said, “I can imagine the kinds of fashion that will fit them. And then I sketch it on paper and what turns up is often a new design.”He disclosed that making quality styles that stand for comfort, especially on women, is one of his top priorities. As Liberia’s fashion industry makes strieds, especially with new, audacious talents sprouting all around, Gibson remains hopeful of more support. “Actually, we are improving when it comes to business. But we’re hoping to achieve more after this fashion show,” he said with a smile. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Dealing With Corruption, From NOCAL On Down

first_imgFollowing the publication on June 24th of the first of my two columns on NOCAL, I was interviewed by a local reporter and I said that President Sirleaf should take responsibility for the mess at the company because she was the one who appointed the board of directors and senior management there. Some people felt I was too harsh.Well, President Sirleaf has accepted responsibility, as well she should. But I am intrigued by her comment that NOCAL had a board and management that were “able”. How can she say that with a straight face? If NOCAL’s board and management were so “able”, then how in the world did they run the company into the ground? Marie Parker, it seems, was the only thing between the company and disaster. After she retired from the company (and later died), things went to hell in a hand basket. The tens of millions of dollars that she left in NOCAL’s bank accounts were subsequently frittered away. Now the company is virtually bankrupt. And the reasons have nothing to do with the drop in the price of oil. They have everything to do with massive overspending.The debacle that we now see at NOCAL did not happen overnight. The seeds of disaster were sown some time ago. And much of the present mess has to be laid at the feet of President Sirleaf’s favourite son, Rob Sirleaf, the Wall Street savant. My information is that Rob worked for Wachovia Bank. Someone needs to tell me when Wachovia migrated to Wall Street.Rob was chairman of NOCAL’s board from early 2012 till his resignation in August 2013. Before that, he was on NOCAL’s board, directing traffic from the back benches. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that, even though he is no longer on the company’s board, he is still calling the shots there.He was chairman when NOCAL’s board was spending US$1.5 million a year. On what, you may well ask? I too wanted to know. I sent NOCAL a data request on December 9, 2014 requesting, amongst other things, information on what NOCAL was paying its board members as board fees; and on the board projects NOCAL was spending money on for 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. I never got an answer, even though our Freedom of Information Act obliges the company, a public entity, to provide me, a citizen of the Republic, with such information.I asked because I had reliably learned that NOCAL was spending lavishly on Rob’s pet projects. Unconfirmed reports suggest, for instance, that NOCAL gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to Rob’s BYC football team. Rob was also on the board when the bloat in the payroll took flight. NOCAL went from a headcount of 20-30 people to one of 170 highly paid management and staff, from a payroll of US$360,000 per annum to one of more than US$7 million.Till this day, NOCAL has not honoured my request for information about its operations. An audit, by one of the Big 4 international accounting firms, not that shower at GAC, should be done on NOCAL (in one of his more delirious moments Rob offered to succumb to such an audit) so the Liberian people can know what has really been going on there.And if any criminal wrongdoing is discovered, President Sirleaf should strike the first blow to slay the vampire by instituting criminal proceedings against anyone found culpable, without fear or favour. People should go to jail. Then we will know that she is really serious about combating corruption.I will return to a position that I have long held: that the only way to effectively combat corruption in our public service is to put people in jail. I don’t believe for a moment that Liberians are born with more corruption genes in their DNA than, say, Americans or Germans or the British. Why corruptions thrives here is because there are no consequences. People steal public money and go scot free. No sanctions. No serious punishment.A couple of personal examples will illustrate how I believe a Liberian leader can effectively combat corruption. In 1973, a very close relative of mine was involved in theft of ticket receipts from a football tournament that we, the Big H Committee, had organized. His accomplices perhaps believed that because he was a close relative of mine, they would just get a slap on the wrist if they were caught. Well, they misjudged me. I grabbed my close relative first before anyone else and slammed him into South Beach prison.Currently, I am embarked on a crusade that stretches back three years to have the former superintendent of our Kokoyah Statutory District prosecuted for eating US$60,000 of monies we had negotiated with a logging company to pay the district for use of our facilities. He was indicted by a grand jury in Gbarnga in November 2013. His trial started a few weeks ago. I will not rest until he is put behind bars, should he be found guilty. No begging.Since President Sirleaf does not know what to do with corrupt government officials, we, the citizens of Kokoyah, will give her a good civics lesson.The writer is a certified public accountant and a businessman. He can be reached at .Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more