ASUS Eee Top Touchscreen PCs Coming 1H 2009

first_img The Asus Eee Top comes in two versions with the ET1602 and the ET1603. Inside the Asus Eee Top ET1603 a discrete ATI Mobility Radeon HD3450 is responsible for more graphics power, as compared to the ET1602, which enables the system to run graphically-intensive 3D applications and games more fluidly. Even though the Asus Eee all-in-one desktop has touch-sensitive screen, it still comes bundled with keyboard and mouse.Setting up the Eee Top is as easy as taking it out of the box and plugging it in. This system is also the perfect computer for beginners. It features an exclusive Easy Mode within Windows that makes commonly-used applications easily accessible. With its sharp and vibrant widescreen (16:9) LCD, the Eee Top becomes the perfect Media Entertainment Center. Asus´s patient Splendid Video Intelligence Technology renders the video display with a vivid and clear image regardless of environmental lighting and SRS technology works in tandem with the Eee Top´s built-in high fidelity speakers to deliver crystal clear audio.The Eee Top touchscreen PC is first to ship in Taiwan, Hong Kong and the UK. In 2009 Asus is also adding larger screen models with 20- and 22-inch Asus Eee Top PCs. There is no information yet as to when these PC´s will be available in the US. Mini-PC-Pro Reviews ASUS Eee Top PC in a live demonstration. © 2008 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Asus has just revealed their 15.6-inch Eee Top touchscreen PC that is powered by an Intel Atom processor N270 (1.60GHz) and Intel 945 GSE core-logic with built-in graphics core. The system features a 160GB hard drive, 1GB of RAM, 4-in-1 card reader, integrated camera, Wi-Fi 802.11n controller and Windows XP Home operating system. Explore further Cute, efficient Eee Top looks like future of home computingcenter_img Citation: ASUS Eee Top Touchscreen PC’s Coming 1H 2009 (2008, November 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-11-asus-eee-touchscreen-pc-1h.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Vicious Giant Python Invading Florida

first_img The rock python is “vicious”, according to Kenneth Krysko of the Florida Museum of Natural History. It is even meaner than the Burmese pythons, which have been known to eat alligators, and which have already taken up residence in the nearby Everglades National Park, where they have wiped out thousands of native animals. Another major alien in the park is the boa constrictor.Six specimens of Africa’s longest snake have been discovered in a single square mile west of Miami, Florida, since the first was sighted in 2002. Krysko believes the original snakes may have been released by pet breeders when they grew too big, or when the breeders were surprised by their aggressiveness. The finding of two hatchlings and a pregnant female suggests the snakes are settling in.The rock python, like the Burmese python and boa constrictor, is not poisonous but kills its prey by constricting it and suffocating it to death before swallowing it.With the Everglades National Park just across the road, the rock python may already have joined the other giant aliens in the park in wiping out the native fauna. According to Robert Reed of the U.S. Geological Survey in Colorado, the new snake might eat any warm-blooded animal it can ingest. The Burmese python is known to eat dozens of species, including white-tailed deer and even six-foot alligators, and Reed expects the rock python to do the same.Another potential problem is inter-breeding of the African rock python and the Burmese python to produce a hybrid species. This has been known to happen in captivity, and while most such offspring are infertile, there is a possibility that offspring of the two species could be even hardier and more deadly than their parents, according to Reed.Kristina Serbesoff-King of the Nature Conservancy in Florida said that we should learn from past mistakes and try to eliminate the rock python while it is still confined to a relatively small area. One approach could be a python patrol, similar to the one the Nature Conservancy ran to try to reduce the numbers of Burmese pythons.If the African rock python is not stopped in its tracks, the scientists agree the problem may be even worse than the Burmese python problem because the rock python is far more aggressive. In its native home the African rock python is known to attack humans, according to Krysko, and if hidden in a swamp, it could strike before you even knew it was there. It could pose a particular danger for pets and small children.© 2009 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — New studies suggest a 20 foot snake, the African rock python, is making its home in Florida and could soon invade the Everglades National Park. Python molurus bivittatus. Image: Wikipedia. Explore further Citation: ‘Vicious’ Giant Python Invading Florida (2009, September 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-09-vicious-giant-python-invading-florida.html Fla. governor approves plan to capture, kill Burmese pythons This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Nanoparticles pass through mucus membranes in lungs to deliver pulmonary drugs

first_img Play Movie of nanoparticles moving through mucus. Credit: Schneider et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601556 The nanoparticles, the team notes, were created using biodegradable materials that prior research found safe for internal use. Testing in mice, they report, showed the particle carriers stayed in the lungs for several hours—they also proved to be more effective than conventional therapies at reducing asthma symptoms such as irritation. The researchers suggest that MPPs could offer a better treatment plan for lung patients by providing a therapy that maintains drug levels in the lungs for longer periods of time, reducing the need for repeated dosing, which itself can cause lung irritation. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: Craig S. Schneider et al. Nanoparticles that do not adhere to mucus provide uniform and long-lasting drug delivery to airways following inhalation, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601556AbstractMucoadhesive particles (MAP) have been widely explored for pulmonary drug delivery because of their perceived benefits in improving particle residence in the lungs. However, retention of particles adhesively trapped in airway mucus may be limited by physiologic mucus clearance mechanisms. In contrast, particles that avoid mucoadhesion and have diameters smaller than mucus mesh spacings rapidly penetrate mucus layers [mucus-penetrating particles (MPP)], which we hypothesized would provide prolonged lung retention compared to MAP. We compared in vivo behaviors of variously sized, polystyrene-based MAP and MPP in the lungs following inhalation. MAP, regardless of particle size, were aggregated and poorly distributed throughout the airways, leading to rapid clearance from the lungs. Conversely, MPP as large as 300 nm exhibited uniform distribution and markedly enhanced retention compared to size-matched MAP. On the basis of these findings, we formulated biodegradable MPP (b-MPP) with an average diameter of <300 nm and examined their behavior following inhalation relative to similarly sized biodegradable MAP (b-MAP). Although b-MPP diffused rapidly through human airway mucus ex vivo, b-MAP did not. Rapid b-MPP movements in mucus ex vivo correlated to a more uniform distribution within the airways and enhanced lung retention time as compared to b-MAP. Furthermore, inhalation of b-MPP loaded with dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DP) significantly reduced inflammation in a mouse model of acute lung inflammation compared to both carrier-free DP and DP-loaded MAP. These studies provide a careful head-to-head comparison of MAP versus MPP following inhalation and challenge a long-standing dogma that favored the use of MAP for pulmonary drug delivery. Play Movie of nanoparticles moving through mucus. Credit: Schneider et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601556 Citation: Nanoparticles pass through mucus membranes in lungs to deliver pulmonary drugs (2017, April 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-nanoparticles-mucus-membranes-lungs-pulmonary.html Journal information: Science Advances Lung problems impact the lives of millions of people. Such conditions include asthma, in which bronchi spasm, making it difficult to breathe; cystic fibrosis, in which over-production of mucus leads to blocking of bronchi; and COPD, in which obstructions form in bronchial passages. Fortunately, these types of ailments are all treatable to some degree, though they cannot be cured. For that reason, scientists continue to look for ways to improve current therapies.Currently, lung ailments such as cystic fibrosis, COPD and asthma are treated with inhaled drugs such as corticosteroids that adhere to the walls of air passages. In some instances, they are carried by what are known as mucoadhesive particles, (MAPs), but, as the researchers note, thick mucus often builds up on such passageways, lessening the effectiveness of the delivery system. In this new effort, the researchers took a different approach—rather than trying to make medicines that adhere do their job better, they turned to nanoparticles that are small enough to make their way through mucus membranes to the lining of the lungs themselves, offering direct medication application to affected areas. Called mucus-penetrating particles (MPP), they remain in the lungs, releasing medication for an extended period of time. The making of mucus in common lung diseases PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2017 Phys.org Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from multiple institutions in the U.S. has developed a new way to treat lung disease—using nanoparticles to transport chemicals through the thick mucus membranes that can coat pulmonary airways. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they used particles small enough to move through holes in the mesh that makes up mucus to deliver helpful drugs.last_img read more