Apan Jewellers owners sued for money laundering

first_img.Customs intelligence on Saturday filed five separate cases against three owners of Apan Jewellers under Money Laundering Prevention Act on charges of being in possession of 15 maunds of gold, and diamonds illegally, reports UNB.Five assistant revenue officers (ARO) of customs intelligence filed the cases with Gulshan police station, Dhanmondi police station, Ramna police station and Uttura police station against Apan Jewellers owners — Dilder Ahmed, Gulzar Ahmed and Azad Ahmed, said Mainul Khan, director general of the Customs Intelligence and Investigation Directorate.The cases were filed following the direction of National Board of Revenue (NBR), Mainul added.Customs intelligence will investigate the cases under section 2 of Money Laundering Prevention Act, 2012 and section 156 (5) of Customs Act, 1969.On 8 June the CIID filed five cases with Dhaka Customs House against the three owners of Apan Jewellers on charges of dodging customs duty on 15.13 maunds of gold seized from its branches.Apan Jewellers is in the limelight after the rape of two private university girls by Shafat, son of Dilder Ahmed, and his cohort in a Banani hotel came to the fore.One of the rape victims filed a case with Banani police station on 6 May accusing five people, including Shafat.last_img read more

Cesar Herada designs oil sucking drones to help clean the seas after

first_img As it turns out someone with some serious skills also wanted that. Cesar Herada, a researcher who has formerly been associated with Ushahidi and MIT’s Senseable City Lab, has created the Protei oil-spill cleaning drone. The Protei oil-spill cleaning drone is designed to be a semi-autonomously device that can sail into the sea and scoop up the oil in a spill, leaving the oil in the container and the water in the ocean. How is this accomplished? With the help of powerful oil-sucking booms that are built into the device. The oil-sucking boom is detachable, and each one is able to hold up to two tons of crude oil per trip. The advantage to using one of these devices is that no humans have to be exposed to toxic substances in order to clean up the mess. © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Oil spills represent a significant danger to the oceans of the world. Many of us watched the DeepWater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico and wished that there was a simple way to clean it up. Citation: Cesar Herada designs oil sucking drones to help clean the seas after a spill (2011, April 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-cesar-herada-oil-drones-seas.html Explore further More information: sites.google.com/a/opensailing.net/protei/ The Protei drones are also able to be modified for other types of disasters. In the future modified versions of the Protei drones may possibly be sent in to detect the levels of radiation in water supplies, or to collect samples of other potentially polluted waters. The designers have also mentioned that there may be some commercial uses for the Protei drones as well, but they did not give any specifics on this point. Clean-up tools may help protect wetlands from Gulf of Mexico oil spill The best part is that Protei is an Open Source Hardware project. This means that its design will be available to the public, so it can be built by anyone. The remote controlled Protei is relatively inexpensive to produce and inflatable. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

3 out of 4 users dont know Facebook categorizes them for ad

first_imgThe Washington-based Pew Research Center released a report that shares the results of its survey based on Facebook user data, yesterday. The survey was conducted on a sample of Facebook users (963 U.S. Facebook users aged 18 years and above) who were asked to present their opinion on the data collected about them by the platform. The nationally representative survey was conducted by the Pew Institute between September 4, 2018, and October 1, 2018. Respondents of the survey were asked to answer a series of questions related to the content present on the Facebook ad categories page. Facebook allows its users to view a “partial compilation” of how they are classified on its “Your ad preferences” page. All the results of this analysis are based on these self-reported answers. Let’s have a look at the key findings from the survey. 60% of Facebook users are assigned 10+ categories on their ad preferences page The report states that Facebook ad preferences page consists of “your categories” tab i.e. a list of a user’s interests analyzed by Facebook’s algorithm based on content that they have posted, liked, commented on or shared.                                                 Pew Institute survey As per the survey results: 88% of American said that they are assigned categories in this system, while 11% saw a message saying, “You have no behaviours” on the ad preferences page. A large majority of Facebook users have 10 or more categories listed on the page. Six-in-ten Facebook users said that their preferences page had either 10 to 20 (27%) or 21 or more (33%) categories for them. 27% noted that their list had fewer than 10 categories. 40% of users who go on Facebook multiple times a day are listed in 21 or more categories as compared to 16% of the “less-than-daily” Facebook users. Facebook users who have been on the platform for 10 years or longer (44%) have higher chances of being listed in 21 or more categories as compared to those with less than five years of Facebook experience (22%). 74% of Facebook users didn’t know the platform lists their interests for advertisers As per the survey results: Three-quarters of Facebook users (74%) did not know the list of categories existed on Facebook, with 12% saying that they were aware of it. 59% of Facebook users say the list was very (13%) or somewhat (46%) accurate about their interests, while 27% of them found the list not very (22%) or not at all ( 5%) accurate. Pew Institute survey Almost half of the Facebook users (51%) said answered that they were not comfortable with Facebook creating the ‘interests list’. 5% of Facebook users were very comfortable with the list and another 31% said that they are somewhat comfortable. Facebook’s political and ‘racial affinity’ labels don’t necessarily match users’ views Facebook assigns political labels to its users. Users who are assigned a political label are equally divided between “liberal or very liberal (34%)”, “conservative or very conservative “(35%) and “moderate” (29%). Pew Institute survey As per the survey results: Close to three-quarters (73%) of the ones assigned a label says the listing is’ very accurate’ or ‘somewhat accurate’ about their views. However, 27% of those say that label is not very or not at all accurate. Facebook’s algorithm also assigns some of its users to groups by “multicultural affinity,” that are assigned to users whose activities “aligns with” certain cultures. About 21% of the Facebook users say they are assigned such an affinity. 60% of the Facebook users assigned with multicultural affinity say they have a “very” or “somewhat” strong affinity for the group they were assigned, while 37% say they do not have a strong affinity. 57% of the Facebook users assigned a group say they consider themselves a member of that group, with 39% saying they are not members of that group. “We want people to understand how our ad settings and controls work..while we and the rest of the online ad industry need to educate people on how interest-based advertising works and how we protect people’s information, we welcome conversations about transparency and control”, Facebook told The Verge. Check out the official Pew research centre report here. Read Next Private International shares its findings on how popular Android apps send user data to Facebook without user consent NYT says Facebook has been disclosing personal data to Amazon, Microsoft, Apple and other tech giants; Facebook denies claims with obfuscating press release ProPublica shares learnings of its Facebook Political Ad Collector projectlast_img read more