Building a Custom Video Program

first_imgStack Media relied on a regional freelance network to reach a few hundred thousand viewers per month when it started its integrated video campaigns in 2008.Within two years, a Stack Studios crew had been assembled and was traveling the country filming for sponsors like Gatorade and Nike. They’re now getting upwards of 15 million views per video and generating 60 percent of the company’s revenue.Stack Magazine, the flagship of the larger media group, was established in 2005 as a training and fitness title centered on professional athletes. Video came in 2008 with the launch of the company’s digital network—a “natural extension” of the content they were already producing, according to Nick Palazzo, the company’s co-founder and CEO.Is It For Your Audience?The demographics worked for Stack. The majority of its audience is comprised of 16 to 24-year-old males—among the most active online video viewers, according to several recent reports. Overall, 18 to 24-year-old men and women with regular access to the Internet spend close to 11 hours watching web videos per month, or nearly one-third of their total time online, says Nielsen’s Cross Platform report from the second quarter of this year. A Pew Research survey from this fall indicates that the group is highly engaged, as well, with nearly a quarter of all adult American males sharing videos.All told, comScore has tallied more than 100 million Americans watching video online each day, up 43 percent from 2010.How Do You Make It?Pricing for the content is highly variable, Palazzo says, with the number of shoots being the key determinant. A single session—requiring travel, equipment, venue, lighting, etc. (along with the personnel to manage it all)—can run up to $10,000. On the low end, a shoot can be arranged for around $1,500. It’s up to the advertiser.The same goes for concept. The project is usually handed off to Stack right from the start, but sponsors can play a larger role.“Sometimes they can be very involved in storyboarding, bringing the concept to life and providing assets,” Palazzo says. In Stack’s case, those “assets” are usually famous athletes, but they can be products, venues, signage, memorabilia, logos, uniforms or anything else they want included.The bigger the asset, the bigger the response. Timing plays a role, but the golden-rule for luring readers to the newsstand applies to attracting viewers online: recognition.“What really drives traffic and engagement is getting the biggest star possible,” Palazzo says.How Do You Sell It?Palazzo estimates that as much as 85 percent of Stack’s content is now video-based, so naturally it’s their lead story to tell potential advertisers. From there it’s a matter of selling the complete distribution and media package.“It’s hard to sell just straight video. You have to package it with other media assets that you already have—that’s really the most important thing,” he says. “In a lot of what we do, you’ll get the video content, the distribution across our platforms, and media—banner and print—all together in one package. It’s much more efficient to buy everything rather than just piecing it out. We make it an offer they can’t refuse.”Integrated Sales Still Difficult To Do With AgenciesIn a divided print and digital world, Stack can run into difficulties trying to manage a deal across the multiple ad agencies running those respective arms. Whenever possible, Palazzo will try to deal directly with the company.“It’s sometimes hard to do integrated ad sales if they have separate agencies for digital and print,” Palazzo says. “One of the most important things to focus on is working directly with the client. They’re going to be the ones that have the ability to do multiplatform deals, as well as the foresight and knowledge base to help make a video program successful.”How Do You Measure It?Stack’s integrated video campaigns don’t feature any product links or buy options—they’re straight branding enterprises—so measuring success can be a challenge. In the absence of conversions, Palazzo relies on engagement metrics like video plays and average time spent with the video to let him know how they performed.“If you get someone to watch a minute or minute-and-a-half of video, that’s a pretty valuable impression,” he says. “If you can get them to click-through, then great, that’s something you can quantify. But that’s not the key metric that we focus on.”last_img read more

3 out of 4 users dont know Facebook categorizes them for ad

first_imgThe Washington-based Pew Research Center released a report that shares the results of its survey based on Facebook user data, yesterday. The survey was conducted on a sample of Facebook users (963 U.S. Facebook users aged 18 years and above) who were asked to present their opinion on the data collected about them by the platform. The nationally representative survey was conducted by the Pew Institute between September 4, 2018, and October 1, 2018. Respondents of the survey were asked to answer a series of questions related to the content present on the Facebook ad categories page. Facebook allows its users to view a “partial compilation” of how they are classified on its “Your ad preferences” page. All the results of this analysis are based on these self-reported answers. Let’s have a look at the key findings from the survey. 60% of Facebook users are assigned 10+ categories on their ad preferences page The report states that Facebook ad preferences page consists of “your categories” tab i.e. a list of a user’s interests analyzed by Facebook’s algorithm based on content that they have posted, liked, commented on or shared.                                                 Pew Institute survey As per the survey results: 88% of American said that they are assigned categories in this system, while 11% saw a message saying, “You have no behaviours” on the ad preferences page. A large majority of Facebook users have 10 or more categories listed on the page. Six-in-ten Facebook users said that their preferences page had either 10 to 20 (27%) or 21 or more (33%) categories for them. 27% noted that their list had fewer than 10 categories. 40% of users who go on Facebook multiple times a day are listed in 21 or more categories as compared to 16% of the “less-than-daily” Facebook users. Facebook users who have been on the platform for 10 years or longer (44%) have higher chances of being listed in 21 or more categories as compared to those with less than five years of Facebook experience (22%). 74% of Facebook users didn’t know the platform lists their interests for advertisers As per the survey results: Three-quarters of Facebook users (74%) did not know the list of categories existed on Facebook, with 12% saying that they were aware of it. 59% of Facebook users say the list was very (13%) or somewhat (46%) accurate about their interests, while 27% of them found the list not very (22%) or not at all ( 5%) accurate. Pew Institute survey Almost half of the Facebook users (51%) said answered that they were not comfortable with Facebook creating the ‘interests list’. 5% of Facebook users were very comfortable with the list and another 31% said that they are somewhat comfortable. Facebook’s political and ‘racial affinity’ labels don’t necessarily match users’ views Facebook assigns political labels to its users. Users who are assigned a political label are equally divided between “liberal or very liberal (34%)”, “conservative or very conservative “(35%) and “moderate” (29%). Pew Institute survey As per the survey results: Close to three-quarters (73%) of the ones assigned a label says the listing is’ very accurate’ or ‘somewhat accurate’ about their views. However, 27% of those say that label is not very or not at all accurate. Facebook’s algorithm also assigns some of its users to groups by “multicultural affinity,” that are assigned to users whose activities “aligns with” certain cultures. About 21% of the Facebook users say they are assigned such an affinity. 60% of the Facebook users assigned with multicultural affinity say they have a “very” or “somewhat” strong affinity for the group they were assigned, while 37% say they do not have a strong affinity. 57% of the Facebook users assigned a group say they consider themselves a member of that group, with 39% saying they are not members of that group. “We want people to understand how our ad settings and controls work..while we and the rest of the online ad industry need to educate people on how interest-based advertising works and how we protect people’s information, we welcome conversations about transparency and control”, Facebook told The Verge. Check out the official Pew research centre report here. Read Next Private International shares its findings on how popular Android apps send user data to Facebook without user consent NYT says Facebook has been disclosing personal data to Amazon, Microsoft, Apple and other tech giants; Facebook denies claims with obfuscating press release ProPublica shares learnings of its Facebook Political Ad Collector projectlast_img read more