Opportunity to build on €400K investment in Malin Head

first_imgThe official launch of the €400K Phase II works at Malin Head took place on Wednesday afternoon by Cathaoirleach of Inishowen Municipal District Cllr. Martin Farren.Cllr Farren described the investment to date as an essential step in the creation of a top class visitor experience at Ireland’s most northerly point which is now considered as a signature discovery point or a ‘must visit’ site on the world renowned Wild Atlantic Way.Visitor numbers to Ireland’s most northerly point has grown substantially in the last number of years with an estimated 172,000 visitors in 2018 thanks to a number of factors including its position as either the starting or finishing point on the Wild Atlantic Way, the filming of Star Wars and the hosting of the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open at nearby Ballyliffin Golf Club in 2018. To facilitate this rise in visitor numbers to this iconic site Donegal County Council has been working closely with a number of key stakeholders including Failte Ireland to put in place essential services to help capitalise on the visitor experience.These works included road widening to accommodate passing bays, drainage improvements and surfacing of 600m of road to the existing lower car park at Malin Head; road widening adjacent to the lower carpark to accommodate bus parking; extending existing car park facilities to incorporate additional car parking spaces and construction of toilet facilities adjacent the lower carpark, including installation of a wastewater holding tank.Launching the €400K Phase II works at Malin Head on Wednesday are Cllr. Nicholas Crossan, Seamus Neely, Chief Executive Donegal County Council, Cllr. Bernard McGuinness, Joan Crawford, Failte Ireland, Cllr. Martin Farren, Cathaoirleach of Inishowen MD, Liam Ward, Donegal County Council, Cllr. Martin McDermott and Cllr. Albert Doherty.This phase of the development also included the provision of services and utilities including water, electricity and telecoms to the site and these services will also be vital for future development at Malin Head.“The completion of this phase of works, which represents a substantial investment by both Failte Ireland and Donegal County Council, is an important milestone in our journey at Malin Head” said Cllr. Farren speaking at the official launch on Wednesday afternoon. “We are now embarking on the next part of this journey with the preparation of a Visitor Management Plan for Malin Head that will set out a framework on how to build on the unique heritage and culture of the area whilst leveraging its position as the most northerly signature discovery point on the Wild Atlantic Way.“I am delighted to see the strong collaborative approach between all stakeholders including the local community in developing this plan.”Speaking about Fáilte Ireland’s support of the plan, Fiona Monaghan, Head of Activities at Fáilte Ireland, said “Fáilte Ireland is delighted to see the completion of Phase II of the Malin Head Visitor Management Plan.Pictured at the new visitor toilet facilities at Malin Head marking the completion of €400K Phase II works at Malin Head on Wednesday are Cllr. Martin Farren, Cathaoirleach of Inishowen MD with Cllr. Nicholas Crossan, Cllr. Bernard McGuinness, Cllr. Martin McDermott, Cllr. Albert Doherty, Seamus Neely, Chief Executive Donegal County Council, Joan Crawford, Failte Ireland, Liam Ward, Donegal County Council, Joe Diver, Malin Head Community Development Association, Geraldine Diver, Malin Head Community Development Association, Catriona Doherty, Malin Head Community Development Association, Jim Mullin, Malin Head Community Development Association, Aideen Doherty, Donegal County Council, Fiona Doherty, Donegal County Council, Shaun Murphy, Donegal County Council and James Kelly, Donegal County Council and representatives from Keys and Monaghan Architects and Cooney Architects.“The plan will guide the future development of a motivating and sustainably managed visitor experience at Malin Head Signature Discovery Point and the wider destination and the next phase, public consultation, is essential if we are going to produce a plan that works for both the visitor and the local community.”Seamus Neely Chief Executive of Donegal County Council described this project as a product of partnership and highlighted the importance of managing the success of Malin Head as a visitor destination in a sustainable way saying: “The real challenge is how we grow on the success to date without damaging what makes this place special. “This is a complex challenge but I believe that it is achievable and that is why we are embarking on the Malin Head Visitor Management Plan.“We look forward to hearing from all interested parties and especially the local community about what their ideas and plans are and how they can be best achieved going forward.”Public consultation workshops for the Malin Head Visitor Management Plan are set to take place this week and next from 6.45pm – 9pm each evening as follows:Wednesday 8th May: St. Mary’s Community Hall, Carnmalin, Malin HeadThursday 9th May: McGrory’s Hotel, CuldaffTuesday 14th May: The Station Room, Public Services Centre, CarndonaghWednesday 15th May: St Patrick’s Parochial Hall, Malin VillageBooking is recommended and you can book your place by email to MalinHeadSDP@gmail.com or book online at http://bit.ly/MalinHeadWorkshops. Opportunity to build on €400K investment in Malin Head was last modified: May 9th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Oakland Athletics edge Texas Rangers in chippy game

first_img What A’s winter ball performances can tell us about the second base race Homer Bailey allowed nine earned runs to a strong Houston Astros team in his previous start for the A’s. Two games later, the A’s began a relatively treacherous three-game homer-less streak (they’d just broken a 21-game streak with at least one home run).Related Articles Player to be …center_img Former Oakland A’s lefty Brett Anderson finds new home with Brewers last_img

Closing the gap: Giants’ best chance to catch up to Dodgers is to copy them

first_imgLOS ANGELES — The Giants might have the best seat in the house for a party they’d rather skip.As the club arrived in Los Angeles for a three-game weekend series on Friday, the first-place Dodgers had a magic number of four to clinch their seventh consecutive National League West title.Despite a 5-4 Giants win on Friday, the Dodgers may still have an opportunity to put the gap between the two franchises in perspective this weekend as any combination of Los Angeles wins and Arizona losses that …last_img read more

Hi-Tech Pharmaceutical Plants Are Green

first_imgIn environmental lingo, what could be greener than a tree?  And what is more despised by many environmentalists than chemical companies, especially the pharmaceutical and pesticide industries?  Maybe we should take a tip from plants.  They are not just environmentally friendly, they produce a myriad of complex compounds that are slowly finding their way into healthful products—and evolutionists have no idea how they do it. Low-hanging fruit.  We know the phrase, “going after the low-hanging fruit.”  It means doing the easy tasks first.  Why, then, did PhysOrg title an article, “Nature reaches for the high-hanging fruit”?  Consider this strange introductory paragraph that affirms evolution then turns around and denies evidence for it: In the first study of its kind, researchers have used tools of paleontology to gain new insights into the diversity of natural plant chemicals. They have shown that during the evolution of these compounds nature doesn’t settle for the ‘low-hanging fruit’ but favours rarer, harder to synthesise forms, giving pointers that will help in the search for potent new drugs. The study is the work by a team from four institutions that used “theoretical morphology” (the art of comparing mathematically-simulated forms to living forms, such as a conch shell) to the investigation of terpenes, a group of natural products produced by plants.  Terpenes have proven useful to man.  Examples include anti-cancer drugs like taxol, fragrances, and flavorings. “The big question is how plants have evolved to make these chemicals,” said Dr ÓMáille of the John Innes Centre and the Institute of Food Research.  “Is there a physical explanation, based on the chemical reaction, for why certain terpenes are favoured? Are plants simply making the easy to synthesize low hanging fruit of the terpene chemical world?” The answer, in a nutshell, is no.  “We discovered a perplexing disparity between the predicted and natural abundance of terpenes,” said Dr ÓMáille, puzzled by the results.  “The common terpenes we see in nature are predicted to be quite rare, based on the chemistry. On the other hand, the terpene forms predicted to dominate are scarcely seen in nature.  Nature in fact reaches for the higher-hanging fruit, skewing chemical reactions to favour rarer chemicals.” Evolutionary theory survived this upset somehow: “This suggests an adaptive significance to the distribution of chemicals produced by plants,” he added.  Meanwhile, entrepreneurs could benefit by looking at plants for “natural products with potent bioactivities that could be used to help meet the ever-growing demand for new effective drugs.” Root marketplace.  Wall Street might take some cues from the underworld.  Another article on PhysOrg announced, “Study reveals nature’s marketplaces can parallel those of humans.”  The marketplaces are those in the underground ecology of plant roots and fungi, where symbiotic interactions are more complex than previously thought.  Like humans, plants have an uncanny ability to size up their trading partners.  “The biggest surprise was that plants can discriminate, even on a single length of their own root system, which fungi are cooperating and which fungi are not so cooperative,” Todd Palmer of the University of Florida said.  Fellow researcher Toby Kiers from Vrije University in the Netherlands quipped, “We were astounded by the bargaining power of the fungi.”  They likened the interactions to “biological markets” where cheaters are punished, cooperators rewarded, and stable relationships for mutual benefit are established. New Scientist took the trading-floor analogy even further, saying that plants work out “fair trade” agreements even on the individual level.  Roots and fungi develop two-way interactions, both sensing and rewarding (or punishing) what the other one does: “they know who the good and bad guys are,” one team member quipped.  Reporter Ferris Jabr was sure that the researchers “have shown that they have evolved ways to enforce fair trading,” but it is not clear if he could have said this without personification and circular reasoning. Drug store:  With such a wealth of compounds all around us in the botanical world, the hunt is on for green drugs – environmentally friendly, non-toxic compounds we can glean from plants.  Some toxicity can be good—if it kills cancer, for instance.  In a study by German and Cameroon scientists published by PLoS One,1 six medicinal compounds from Cameroonian plants were evaluated for their cytotoxicity (ability to destroy cancer cells).  The motivation is obvious: Natural products are well recognized as sources for drugs in several human ailments including cancers. Examples of natural pharmaceuticals from plants include vincristine, irinotecan, etoposide and paclitaxel. Despite the discovery of many drugs of natural origin, the search for new anticancer agents is still necessary, in order to increase the range available and to find less toxic and more effective drugs. It has been recommended that samples with pharmacological usage should be taken into account when selecting plants to treat cancer, as several ailments reflect disease states bearing relevance to cancer or cancer-like symptoms. Therefore, we designed the present work to investigate the cytotoxicity of six natural compounds available in our research group, with previously demonstrated pharmacological activities. Why synthesize complex organic molecules, in other words, when effective compounds are all around us?  These authors were on a treasure hunt, and did not seem to need Origin of Species for a map.  There was no mention of evolution in the paper. 1. Kuete, Wabo, Eyong et al., “Anticancer Activities of Six Selected Natural Compounds of Some Cameroonian Medicinal Plants,” Public Library of Science One, 6(8): e21762. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021762. Darwinism is a thought drug that is useless and harmful.  Kick the habit by design.  Help your fellow man with scientific investigation of the designed wonders under your feet.  A weed in your garden could cure cancer.  Does anyone need Darwin to tell us where to look?  Don’t just grab the low hanging fruit of scientific explanation and make Darwine out of it.  Reach for quality and excellence, like plants do, by design.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Manipulating Fossils to Fit Evolution

first_img(Visited 665 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 No matter how unusual a fossil appears, evolutionists will find a way to fit it into their favorite Darwin narrative, or else will ignore the non-Darwinian implications.Wait: those aren’t bird teeth! For 50 years, Live Science says, cryptic teeth in Alberta separated from the bodies have been interpreted as bird teeth. That’s a load of croc, Laura Geggel writes. They’re really crocodile teeth. Sydney Mohr says, “No one has ever taken a really good look at them.” She compared them to teeth of extinct bird groups and crocodilians, and found that they matched juvenile croc teeth the best.It’s also possible that some of the teeth did, in fact, come from birds, Mohr said. But even if they didn’t, that doesn’t mean prehistoric birds didn’t fly over southern Alberta. It’s possible that toothless birds lived there, or that toothed-bird remains simply weren’t preserved, she said.Speaking of toothless birds, PNAS built an evolutionary tale out of tooth loss. That’s right; loss of teeth in birds who evolved beaks. They say that their hypothesis “provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks.”Shifts toward earlier cessation of postnatal tooth development can be identified in fish, amphibians, and mammals that are edentulous [toothless] as adults; therefore the identification of similar transitions in multiple Mesozoic theropod dinosaur lineages strongly implies that heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis played an important role in the macroevolution of beaks in modern birds.Turning tooth development off in the embryo seems an easy thing for chance to do. Wouldn’t a better case of macroevolution be to evolve teeth from scratch?The dinosaur-eating frog: Sounds like a horror movie for the Jurassic Park series: “Giant Frog Eats T. rex”. Actually, this frog, with a powerful bite, probably concentrated on smaller dinos. They didn’t find dinosaurs in its stomach, but Science Daily reports,South American horned frog: credit, Kristopher LappinScientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs….The study found that small horned frogs, with head width of about 4.5cm, can bite with a force of 30 newtons (N) or about 3 kg or 6.6 lbs. A scaling experiment, comparing bite force with head and body size, calculated that large horned frogs that are found in the tropical and subtropical moist lowland forests of South America, with a head width of up to 10 cm, would have a bite force of almost 500 N. This is comparable to reptiles and mammals with a similar head size.“This would feel like having 50 litres of water balanced on your fingertip,” says Professor Kristopher Lappin, Professor of Biological Sciences at California State Polytechnic University — Pomona.Based on their scaling relationship, the scientists estimated the bite force of the giant extinct frog Beelzebufo — which is in many ways similar to living horned frogs — may have had a bite up to 2200 N, comparable to formidable mammalian predators such as wolves and female tigers.“At this bite force, Beelzebufo would have been capable of subduing the small and juvenile dinosaurs that shared its environment,” says Dr Jones.Doesn’t this imply that extinct frogs were more fit than modern frogs? The scientists didn’t go into that.Imagining ancestors. Fossils of small, agile predators: how could these be the ancestors of giant sauropods, the largest herbivores that ever walked the earth? Science Daily reports without criticism a remarkable thesis by evolutionists in Munich who connect these two unlikely relatives:The best known sauropod dinosaurs were huge herbivorous creatures, whose brain structures were markedly different from those of their evolutionary predecessors, for the earliest representatives of the group were small, lithe carnivores….However, the early representatives of the lineage that led to these lumbering giants were strikingly different in form and habits. For a start, they were carnivores — like Saturnalia tupiniquim, an early sauropod dinosaur that was about the same size as a modern wolf.This hypothesis, based entirely on comparing dentition, reminds Darwin skeptics of the evolutionary story about a wolf-sized land animal becoming a gigantic whale. And what about the neck becoming longer? Remember what evolutionists admitted about the classic evolutionary story of the giraffe? (9/16/17). This story is even more implausible.The upside-down ankylosaurs. Paleontologists from Alberta were curious why 70% of ankylosaurs are found belly up. Is that due to chance, or to some other reason? Did predators turn them over? Apparently not; most lack tooth marks. Live Science says ” the researchers tested what turned out to be the correct hypothesis — that the ankylosaurs had either drowned or been swept out to sea once they died.” The “bloat and float” hypothesis pictures them filling with gas after drowning and flipping over. Glyptodonts, which evolutionists date earlier, are also often found on their backs. But since armored dinosaurs are large and heavy, up to 26 feet long and weighing 8 tons, doesn’t that require rapid burial? Laura Geggel calmly asserts, “These Late Cretaceous armored beasts were swept out to sea after they died, where they flipped over, sunk down to the seabed and fossilized, the researchers found.” But if that hypothesis were correct, we should expect to observe that happening to large, heavy animals today. Typically, animals are quickly eaten at sea. What could sweep a huge, heavy animal like an ankylosaur out to sea? Doesn’t that require a rather large Flood?Fossils do not interpret themselves. They are seen through the lens of a worldview. Evolutionists don’t just see fossils through Darwin-colored glasses. That would imply they could take the glasses off and think objectively. No; their Darwin worldview has been carved into their eyeballs like irreversible lasik surgery. Darwin Lasik distorts every bone it sees, like seeing fossils through a fun-house mirror that stre-e-e-t-t-t-ches things into millions of years.last_img read more

Farm and fair photo contest winner

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With the end of the Fairfield County Fair in October, the 2015 Ohio fair season wrapped up. It has been another great year of fairs around Ohio and many online visitors enjoyed seeing favorite photos from around the state throughout the summer.In addition, this year’s photo contest also included a bit more diversity with Ohio agriculturally-related photos of any kind. The contest ended Oct. 30. To see the entries, click here.A winner was chosen based on the total number of votes via online voting. The winner will receive a pass for free admission to any Ohio county fair and the Ohio State Fair in 2016. The fair pass is compliments of the Ohio Fair Managers Association.This year’s winner is Cathy McKinney from Waynesburg, who submitted this photo with the following caption: Swimsuit — check. Cowboy boots — check. Feeding time — check. Summer on the farm — priceless.last_img read more

Understanding Military Homecoming After Deployment

first_imgSource: Knobloch, L. K., Knobloch-Fedders, L. M., & Yorgason, J. B. (2019). Mental health symptoms and the reintegration difficulty of military couples following deployment: A longitudinal application of the relational turbulence model. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 75, 742-765. By Leanne Knobloch, University of IllinoisFor many military couples, deployment can be a seemingly endless countdown to the service member’s homecoming. But, after the big day finally arrives and the welcome home ceremony is over, what’s next for military couples?A new study our research team published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology provides insight into the transition from deployment to reintegration. Our project was funded by the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs through the Military Operational Medicine Research Program. My co-authors on the study included my sister, Dr. Lynne Knobloch-Fedders from Marquette University, and our collaborator, Dr. Jeremy Yorgason from Brigham Young University.We had two goals for our investigation. First, we wanted to map out the transition from deployment to reintegration. Second, we wanted to identify factors that predict challenges along the way.We conducted the study by recruiting 1,100 individuals who were part of 555 military couples, and we asked them to complete an online questionnaire once per month for eight consecutive months after the service member’s homecoming from deployment. Each month, returning service members and at-home partners reported on their mental health, their relationship, and their difficulty with reintegration.Participants included active duty, reserve component, and National Guard military couples. The study involved military couples from all branches of service.Our findings showed that military couples reported the most difficulty with reintegration approximately four to five weeks after homecoming, and at-home partners reported more difficulty with reintegration than returning service members at each time point.These results highlight the importance of supporting at-home partners. The timing of help matters as well. In particular, four to five weeks after homecoming may be a key opportunity for offering services.Other findings revealed that mental health symptoms predicted later difficulty with reintegration. Posttraumatic stress symptoms for returning service members, and depressive symptoms for at-home partners, made the transition especially challenging.Based on these results, it’s important to know the symptoms of mental health problems and be ready to seek help if needed. Readjusting after deployment can be tough, and reaching out for assistance if necessary is the best thing you can do for yourself and your family.Our data also showed that characteristics of people’s relationships predicted difficulty with reintegration down the road. The transition was harder for partners who had questions about their relationship and who got in the way of each other’s daily routines.What do these results mean? As much as possible, people should open the lines of communication, share information, ask questions, and learn where their partner is coming from. And, carefully building new routines and making sure those routines run smoothly should be helpful as well. Leanne K. Knobloch (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison) is a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois. Her research examines how people communicate during times of transition, including how military families navigate the deployment cycle and how romantic couples cope with depression. Her work has been honored by the Golden Anniversary Monograph Award from the National Communication Association, the Biennial Article Award from the International Association for Relationship Research, and the University Scholar Award from the University of Illinois.last_img read more

CRPF jawans injured as militants open fire in Anantnag district

first_imgSeveral jawans were injured in an attack by militants on a CRPF patrol party near Lazibal area, Anantnag district of south Kashmir, on Thursday morning.However, unconfirmed reports suggest four jawans were injured. “We are assessing the situation. Reinforcements have been sent to nab the attackers,” said a police official.last_img