January 20 2004 The compost bins in camp have mov

first_imgJanuary 20, 2004The compost bins in camp have moved to the south side of the poulonia garden. Agriculture crewmembers are working on additional bins. All of the food scraps from the Arcosanti cafe, and from individual kitchens, is composted and used as fertilizer by the Agriculture and Landscaping departments.[Photo & Text: aa] Agriculture employee, Brad Crutchfield, assembles wooden pallets for a new compost bin (right). Hiroshi Kondo, volunteering from Japan, strips juniper branches to use them in the composting process (left).[Photo & Text: aa]last_img read more

Intelsats nextgeneration EPIC class of satellite

first_imgIntelsat’s next-generation EPIC class of satelliteSatellite operator Intelsat has agreed to merge with affordable internet provider OneWeb, in a deal backed by a large investment from Japan’s SoftBank Group.Intelsat and OneWeb will merge in a share-for-share transaction, with Intelsat also agreeing a share-purchase agreement with OneWeb investor SoftBank.SoftBank will invest US$1.7 billion in newly issued common and preferred shares of the combined company – a move designed to help reduce Intelsat’s debt by approximately $3.6 billion. This will result in SoftBank taking an approximate 39.9% voting stake in the combined business.The investment comes after SoftBank committed to invest US$1 billion in OneWeb in December, to help support OneWeb’s vision of delivering affordable, high-speed, low-latency internet to rural and remote communities around the world.“We believe that combining Intelsat with OneWeb will create an industry leader unique in its ability to provide affordable broadband anywhere in the world,” said Intelsat CEO Stephen Spengler.“As an early equity investor in OneWeb, we recognised a network that was a complement to our next-generation Intelsat EpicNG fleet and a fit with our long-term strategy. By merging OneWeb’s LEO satellite constellation and innovative technology with our global scale, terrestrial infrastructure and GEO satellite network, we will create advanced solutions that address the need for ubiquitous broadband.”Spengler said that the deal will “significantly strengthen” Intelsat’s capital structure and help it to accelerate into new areas, such as providing connectivity for connected vehicles.OneWeb founder and CEO, Greg Wyler, said: “With SoftBank’s support we will build the world’s first truly global broadband company, accelerating our mission of bridging the digital divide by connecting the four billion people without access today. While there are numerous growth paths available to OneWeb, we are very excited at the prospect of working with Intelsat on this shared objective.”SoftBank chairman and CEO Masayoshi Son added: “This combination is consistent with SoftBank’s strategy of investing in disruptive, foundational technologies that are building the infrastructure for tomorrow, and this proposal offers a win-win opportunity to accelerate OneWeb’s mission while enhancing the Intelsat balance sheet.”The deal is expected to close late in the third quarter of 2017.last_img read more

NBCUniversals adsupported streaming offering is

first_imgNBCUniversal’s ad-supported streaming offering is to launch in April 2020, Comcast has announced.Speaking on the company’s Q2 earnings call NBCU CEO Steve Burke said that 500 people are currently working on the service that is scheduled to launch next April. Burke confirmed that the service will be built on the Now TV platform, which is currently deployed by Sky in Europe. The CEO also confirmed that the service will be built around acquired programming, contrasting with the likes of Disney+ and Apple+ which are heavily focusing on originals.Burke said that The Office (US) in particular will serve as a ‘tent pole’ programme on the platform, saying: “The Office was important to us because, according to Nielsen, The Office is the number one show on Netflix. It’s about 5% of all of Netflix’s volume, which, obviously, a show that was on NBC and is tied to the DNA of NBC.”The company is confident about its streaming offering, and argues that it has a unique proposition unlike its competitors. Burke said: “We believe we have a very innovative way of coming into the market that is very different than anything else in the market and, we believe, has very attractive financial aspects versus other ways to get into streaming.”Comcast CEO and chairman Brian Roberts added: “We’re making great progress on the direct-to-consumer streaming service. We believe the strength of our assets and leadership across our businesses, combined with access to tens of millions of customers, will lower both our cost of entry and execution risk as we deliver a truly special offering.”last_img read more

Rice scientists make first nanoscale pH meter

first_imgShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: jadeboyd@rice.eduRice scientists make first nanoscale pH meter Tiny, high-resolution sensors could probe living cells, tissues HOUSTON — (June 29, 2006) — Using unique nanoparticles that convert laser light into useful information, Rice University scientists have created the world’s first nano-sized pH meter.The discovery, which appears online this week in the jour nal Nano Letters, present s biologists with the first potential means of measuring accurate pH changes over a wide pH range in real-time inside living tissue and cells.“Almost every biologist I speak with comes up with one or two things they’d like to measure with this,” said lead researcher Naomi Halas, the Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, professor of chemistry and director of Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP).For example, pH may be useful in determining whether or not some cancer tumors are malignant. With current methods, a piece of the tumor would need to be physically removed via biopsy – a painful and invasive procedure – and visually evaluated under a microscope. Halas said LANP’s new nano-pH meter could be used instead as an “optical biopsy” to measure the pH inside the tumor with nothing more invasive than an injection.Halas’s LANP team created the pH sensor using nanoshells, optically tuned nanoparticles invented by Halas. Each nanoshell contains a tiny core of non-conducting silica that’s covered by a thin shell of metal, usually gold. Many times smaller than living cells, nanoshells can be produced with great precision and the metal shells can be tuned to absorb or scatter specific wavelengths of light.To form the pH sensor, Halas’ team coated the nanoshells with pH-sensitive molecules called paramercaptobenzoic acid, or pMBA. When placed in solutions of varying acidity and illuminated, the nanoshell-molecule device provides small but easily detectable changes in the properties of the scattered light that, when “decoded,” can be used to determine the pH of the nanodevice’s local environment to remarkably high accuracy. Inspired by techniques normally applied to image recognition, the team formulated an efficient statistical learning procedure to produce the device output, achieving an average accuracy of 0.1 pH units.The term “pH”   was coined by the Danish chemist Søren Sørensen in 1909 as a convenient way of expressing a solution’s acidity. pH ranges from one – the most acidic – to 14 – the most alkaline.Co-authors on the paper include postdoctoral researchers Sandra Bishnoi, now an assistant professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology, and Muhammed Gheith; graduate students Christopher Rozell and Carly Levin; Bruce Johnson, distinguished faculty fellow of chemistry and executive director of the Rice Quantum Institute; and Don Johnson, J.S. Abercrombie Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Statistics.The research was supported by the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Keck Foundation, the Robert A. Welch Foundation and by Texas Instruments. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more