Donegal family make their TV debut after nationwide search

first_imgThe wait is over for siblings Dylan, Kate, Emily McMenamin and their treasured dog Sky who will appear on RTE2 today (Sun).Following a national search some months ago Dylan, Kate and Emily children of Damien and Daireen, were selected to star in a new TV Series for RTE, Ace My Space.A very rigorous audition process took place over a month including multiple auditions such as a half-hour long skype interview with the Stranorlar family who are clients of The Karen Gorman Academy of Speech and Drama & Casting Agency. Indeed Sky the dog was also auditioned in what proved to be a most successful process.“I knew instantly that the Mc Menamin family were the ideal candidates. They excel in every possible way and achieve incredible results always. They are the kindest, most modest children with a most admirable work ethic, what a winning combination.“This is no surprise to anyone who knows their adoring parents and grandparents. We were informed that we had the highest number of children shortlisted from any agency nationally. I am so delighted with this,” said Karen Gorman.This was a massive project and Dylan, Kate & Emily excelled from the outset even with 6.30am starts. A crew of 20 professionals travelled to Donegal to film where they were spoiled with kindness and hospitality.The very kind Katie Herron of the Donegal ladies made a surprise visit to Kate on the grounds of Mc Cumhaills, Stranorlar during filming.Donegal family make their TV debut after nationwide search was last modified: November 23rd, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Golden State Warriors reportedly to waive veteran Shaun Livingston

first_imgVeteran guard Shaun Livingston, who won three NBA titles with the Golden State Warriors, will be waived by the team, according to published reports.Livingston, 34, still has intentions of playing at least one more season, which would be his 16th year in the league. It was thought he might retire after this season. ESPN first reported the news.The former fourth overall selection in the 2004 draft by the Los Angeles Clippers has played the past five seasons with the Warriors. He averaged 4.0 …last_img read more

US delays announcing second round of punishing duties on Bombardier CSeries

first_imgMONTREAL – The U.S. Department of Commerce says it is delaying its announcement on preliminary anti-dumping duties against Bombardier Inc. until Friday. The company is expected to face additional export duties on its CSeries commercial jet.The decision follows last week’s move to impose nearly 220 per cent preliminary countervailing tariffs once deliveries to Delta Air Lines begin next year.The Montreal-based transportation manufacturer (TSX:BBD.B) has said it wouldn’t be shocked if the U.S. piles on by announcing another “absurd” duty.Colin Bole, Bombardier’s sales chief for commercial aircraft, said the company expects the second duty to be a “significant number” but one that also makes no sense.Boeing revised its request for anti-dumping duties to 143 per cent from around 80 per cent because of Bombardier’s refusal to provide certain information to the Commerce Department.The U.S. aerospace giant petitioned to the government in April after its smaller rival secured a deal for up to 125 of its CS100s with Delta in 2016.The department’s preliminary countervailing duty findings agreed with Boeing that Bombardier benefited from improper government subsidies, giving it an unfair advantage when selling its CSeries jets south of the border.Bombardier has repeatedly stressed that Americans will be hurt by the tariffs because more than half the content on the CSeries is sourced by U.S. suppliers, including Pratt & Whitney engines. The program is expected to generate more than US$30 billion in business over its life and support more than 22,700 American jobs in 19 states.The company has said the exorbitant duties are unfounded and the company is confident they will be reversed in final decisions in coming months. Bombardier says Boeing can’t justify its claim of being harmed since it doesn’t make a plane the size of the CS100.Bombardier is hoping the high duties won’t stand when the Department of Commerce announces its final ruling in December. The key decision likely won’t come, however, until the U.S. International Trade Commissions decides whether the Bombardier-Delta deal actually hurt Boeing’s business, a decision that’s not expected until early February.A protracted battle could then ensue if either side appeals the case to the U.S. Court of International Trade, brings it before NAFTA dispute bodies, or even take the matter to the World Trade Organization.Boeing’s complaint has prompted a heavy political reaction from the Canadian government and British Prime Minister Theresa May, who fears job losses at Bombardier’s wing assembly facility in Northern Ireland.Canada has threatened to cancel the planned purchase of 18 Super Hornets to temporarily augment Canada’s aging fleet of CF-18s.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and May are appealing directly to U.S. President Donald Trump.last_img read more

Unusual killer spring frost damages crops in fields across the Maritimes

first_imgAn unusual “killer” frost has caused widespread damage to crops in the Maritimes, with everything from Nova Scotian wine grapes to Island asparagus harmed by a sharp plunge in spring temperatures.Farmers were beginning to assess the toll from the June cold front that hit Monday, as word came from Environment Canada of yet another frost advisory for early Thursday in all of Atlantic Canada.“It’s the beginning of the year and it’s a bad time for something like this to happen, just as the growing season begins,” Keith Colwell, Nova Scotia’s minister of agriculture, said in a telephone interview Wednesday.Gerry McConnell, founder of Benjamin Bridge vineyards, said the frost caused significant damage to his wine grapes in the Gaspereau Valley.“The temperatures across Nova Scotia did drop down to -2 C and in some places -4 C. Those are killer frost temperatures,” he said.“But it happened in variable ways … Some vineyards were hit much harder than others.”Curtis Millen, a strawberry and blueberry farmer in Great Village, N.S., has been trying to rescue his crops from a series of cold, wet days that included Monday’s frost.He has a water system to warm the buds of his strawberries, but which caused the plants to be caked in ice Monday morning. Photographs of plants on the morning the temperatures plummeted show strawberry leaves shining under a coat of ice.He now needs days of sun to dry out the fields and allow the crops to absorb nutrients.“We’ve got damage from frost and we have damage also from overhead irrigation trying to keep the frost off and wetting the plants to death,” he said Wednesday as he worked on his roughly 80 hectares of strawberries about 30 kilometres northwest of Truro.He estimated one-third of his strawberry crop would be damaged, adding that other farmers without the overhead, anti-frost immigration system have incurred much greater losses. His blueberry losses are even more extensive, he said.Ian Hubbard, a meteorologist at Environment Canada, said record lows were set early Monday. In Kentville, N.S., it dropped to almost -2 C, marking a huge shift from the 28 C high on Friday that had set off a growth spurt in a wide variety of crops before the frost hit.Mathew Vankoughnett, a researcher with the applied geomatics research group at Nova Scotia Community College, says such a rapid temperature flip is rare.His research indicates that Greenwood, N.S., in the centre of the Annapolis Valley, only had one similar episode in 1978 when temperatures fell below 0 on June 2.“We expect this type of spell to occur in April and maybe early May, but not June,” he said in an email.Larry Lutz, president of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association, has an apple farm south of Berwick in the Annapolis Valley. He said his Rockland farm and others at higher elevation suffered little to no damage as a result of the freeze, but added it was a different story for farms at lower elevations.“On the valley floor it hit between -3 C and -5 C, which at that point you would see in excess of 90 per cent damage,” he said. “So the growers on the valley floor suffered significant damage.”Lutz said cherry, plumb and pear growers are experiencing the same problems.He said he examined one pear farm Wednesday, finding it likely lost all but 10 to 20 per cent of the crop.McConnell, who is also the vice-chairman of the Winery Association of Nova Scotia, said many of the province’s roughly 15 vineyards were also affected, with harm varying from complete devastation to minimal damage.He said it will be several weeks before he can estimate the extent of the damage to the crops, in part because it remains to be seen how secondary and tertiary buds will fare.In P.E.I., Matt Hughes with the Island’s federation of agriculture in Charlottetown, said damage is being tallied up.“I lost the remainder of my asparagus crop. The frost ended my asparagus crop pretty abruptly. I started a few weeks ago and got some harvest off,” he said in an interview from his farm at Kellys Cross, 30 kilometres east of Charlottetown.“We had two major frosts here and it’s ruined three of my four cutting dates. I would have had four harvests before this frost.”Hughes said farmers grow used to some of the challenges associated with weather fluctuations, but this spring has been especially tough.“I grew up on a farm and we always get up and down years, but this seems to be an extreme year.”— With files from Alison Auld and Keith Doucette.last_img read more

Power Financial reports record earnings in Q2 on strong subsidiaries performance

first_imgTORONTO – Power Financial Corp. reported better-than-expected second-quarter net income, the highest in the company’s history.The Power Corporation of Canada subsidiary reported net earnings of $658 million, and earnings per share of 92 cents, compared to $622 million, or 87 cents per share in the second quarter of 2017.The earnings beat analysts estimates for the quarter of $618 million, or 82 cents per share.Power Financial cited strong performance from subsidiaries Great-West Lifeco, Putnam Investments and IGM Financial, which reported record assets under management of $159.1 billion, up 7.1 per cent from the year prior.The strong results at Power Corp.’s main financial services division were offset by declines in its other divisions including Sagard Investment Funds and China AMC as well as other investments and subsidiaries.Power Corp. reported net earnings of $347 million, or 75 cents per share, largely in line with those in the year-earlier quarter.Companies in this story: (TSX:PWF)last_img read more