Selfishness and Responsibility Are Just a Game

first_imgIt’s become increasingly common for evolutionists to explain human behavior in terms of games.  Another entry in this genre was published by Science Daily, which began, “‘Game theory’ is used to predict the behaviour of individuals when making choices that depend on the choices of others.  First developed as a tool for understanding economic behaviour, game theory is increasingly used in many diverse fields, ranging from biology and psychology to sociology and philosophy.”    Researchers at the Universities of Exeter and Bristol devised a mathematical model and applied it to humans, in order to provide “a new explanation as to why a wide range of personality traits has evolved in humans and other social species.”  Their basic idea is that if you seed the mathematical model their colleague developed with variation and monitoring by others, a diversity of selfish and cooperative individuals popped out as an artifact.   In evolutionary terms, this trend is self-perpetuating: variation begets more variation, increasing the gap between those who trusted and co-operated, and those that exploited trusting individuals….    Although the model focuses on individuals, the findings have implications for understanding whole societies  They are also significant because they offer an explanation as to why variation has evolved in human beings and other social species.They seem to be implying that politics, economics, law, national security, charity, and love have now all been subsumed under the game of evolution.  But does a game really qualify as a scientific explanation?  It seems to suffer the same flaw as natural selection: just as selection implies a selector, a game implies a game-maker who sets up the rules.  Is that not what they did with their mathematical model? OK, let’s play their little game.  Let’s punish these non-cooperators for exploiting the gullibility of individuals.  How could they complain?  We’re just more clever at the game than they are.  While they are scratching their heads about our strategy, we move in for the checkmate: pointing out that, by sacrificing their own queen of rationality, they have exposed King Darwin to self-refutation.  For more detail, read the entries from 10/02/2008, 06/03/2008, 05/02/2008, 04/23/2008, 03/21/2008, 03/12/2008, 02/03/2008, and 01/20/2008 – and that’s just from this year.  It gets so tiring to beat the evolutionists at their own game all the time when we’re trying to get some work done.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Darwinists Cannot Deny “Disturbing” Implications

first_imgA common attitude among scientists is that they are not responsible for what people do with their discoveries.  Facts are facts, after all, and nuclear energy can be used to power a city as well as destroy it.  Is this a truism or a half-truth?  Are there cases where a scientist is responsible for what he or she proclaims as a fact about the world?    In its continuing celebration of Darwin, Science magazine printed an article about “Darwin’s Originality” by Peter J. Bowler.1  This philosopher from Queen’s University of Belfast described how Darwin’s theory of evolution had “disturbing” ramifications.  “In this essay,” he began, “I argue that Darwin was truly original in his thinking, and I support this claim by addressing the related issue of defining just why the theory was so disturbing to his contemporaries.”  He used the word disturbing five more times.    Bowler elaborated on what was most disturbing.  It’s not that Darwin invented or discovered evolution – evolutionary thinking was already in the air in Victorian Britain.  “Most thinkers—including Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and [Robert] Chambers—took it for granted that the development of life on earth represents the unfolding of a coherent plan aimed at a predetermined goal,” he said.  Darwin was different.  Darwin attributed all the “unfolding” (which is what evolution means) to result from the environment.  His critics understood what this implied:Darwin’s world view was profoundly different because he argued that the adaptation of populations to their local environment was the sole cause of transmutation.  Many people found it hard to see natural selection as the agent of either divine benevolence or of a rationally structured cosmic teleology.  Selection adapted species to an ever-changing environment, and it did so by killing off useless variations in a ruthless “struggle for existence.”  This did not seem the kind of process that would be instituted by a benevolent God, especially because its essentially “selfish” nature meant that a parasitic way of life was a perfectly natural adaptive response in some circumstances.    More seriously for the idea of cosmic teleology, Darwin’s supposition that the production of the individual variants in a population was essentially undirected ruled out any possibility that evolution could be shaped by a predetermined developmental trend.  There was no obvious goal toward which it was aimed, and it did not produce an orderly pattern of relations between species.  The accusation that the theory depended on “random” variation indicated the concerns of his opponents on this score.  As Darwin himself made clear, variation was certainly caused by something (later identified as genetic mutations), but it was not aimed in any one direction and, thus, left adaptive evolution essentially open-ended.Bowler delved into the history behind this idea, the responses of Darwin’s contemporaries, the battle over natural theology, the Victorian mindset, motivations and influences in Darwin’s life, the 19th-century debates on teleology vs the undirected character of natural selection, and the reluctance with which Darwinism became accepted in the scientific community.  The reader might be tempted to ask whether the discussion is merely academic.  If, after all, this is the way the world works, all Darwin was doing was lifting a corner of the veil.  This is reality.  Mankind will just to have to learn to deal with it.    In his final section, “The Struggle for Existence,” Bowler is not so keen to let Darwin and the modern Darwinists off the hook with a “Get out of jail free” card just for being scientists.  In the first place, the Malthusian idea of struggle for existence, which was pervasive in Victorian England, could have been applied in different ways.  Bowler argues that Spencer applied it to individual effort to succeed.  “Much of what later became known as ‘social Darwinism’ was, in fact, Spencerian social Lamarckism expressed in the terminology of struggle popularized by Darwin,” he claimed.  What Darwin did, though, was make this struggle metaphor something ruthless and impersonal:This point is important in the context of the charge raised by modern opponents of Darwinism that the theory is responsible for the appearance of a whole range of unpleasant social policies based on struggle.  Darwin exploited the idea of the struggle for existence in a way that was unique until paralleled by Wallace nearly 20 years later.  Their theory certainly fed into the movements that led toward various kinds of social Darwinism, but it was not the only vehicle for that transition in the late 19th century.  It did, however, highlight the harsher aspects of the consequences of struggle.  The potential implications were drawn out even more clearly when Galton argued that it would be necessary to apply artificial selection to the human race in order to prevent “unfit” individuals from reproducing and undermining the biological health of the population.  This was the eugenics program, and in its most extreme manifestation at the hands of the Nazis, it led not just to the sterilization but also to the actual elimination of those unfortunates deemed unfit by the state.  Did Darwin’s emphasis on the natural elimination of maladaptive variants help to create a climate of opinion in which such atrocities became possible?    It has to be admitted that, by making death itself a creative force in nature, Darwin introduced a new and profoundly disturbing insight into the world, an insight that seems to have resonated with the thinking of many who did not understand or accept the details of his theory.Darwin himself, of course, could not have known what was coming.  Lest anyone misunderstand, Bowler states clearly that “Darwinism was not ‘responsible’ for social Darwinism or eugenics in any simple way.”  In fact, some eugenicists and social Darwinists denied the mechanism of natural selection.  The Nazis did not want to believe that Aryans had evolved from apes.  There were a variety of views about evolution and the struggle for existence.  Nevertheless, Bowler is not ready to let Darwin off the hook so easily:But by proposing that evolution worked primarily through the elimination of useless variants, Darwin created an image that could all too easily be exploited by those who wanted the human race to conform to their own pre-existing ideals.  In the same way, his popularization of the struggle metaphor focused attention onto the individualistic aspects of Spencer’s philosophy.This brings us back to the original question: can scientists distance themselves from their findings?  Keep in mind that Darwinism goes beyond a discovery of facts about the living world.  The Origin did not really catalog any new facts of biology that were not already known.  What he did was put them together into “one long argument” that presented an entire history of life, a world view, that generated all the variety of living organisms via selfishness and struggle.  When any scientist proposes to change the way we think about the world, Bowler argues that he or she must be willing to take responsibility for the consequences.  Let’s listen to his closing paragraph, where he generalizes the Darwin saga to all of science.Modern science recognizes the importance of Darwin’s key insights when used as a way of explaining countless otherwise mysterious aspects of the natural world.  But some of those insights came from sources with profoundly disturbing implications, and many historians now recognize that the theory, in turn, played into the way those implications were developed by later generations.  This is not a simple matter of science being “misused” by social commentators, because Darwin’s theorizing would almost certainly have been different had he not drawn inspiration from social, as well as scientific, influences.  We may well feel uncomfortable with those aspects of his theory today, especially in light of their subsequent applications to human affairs.  But if we accept science’s power to upset the traditional foundations of how we think about the world, we should also accept its potential to interact with moral values.Let’s apply what Bowler just said to another current issue.  Robert Roy Britt wrote on January 6 in Live Science that man may be causing “Reverse evolution” by culling the biggest trophy animals out of populations.  Forward and reverse, however, only makes sense within a concept of progress.  “Survival of the smallest is not exactly what Darwin had in mind, but in some animals species, humans may be forcing a smaller-is-better scenario, and the ultimate outcome may be species demise.”  It’s a macho thing to go for the big trophy.  Britt seemed to dodge the question though, whether in evolutionary terms this is good or bad, though he spoke of elephant poaching as a “dastardly” form of selection.  His article relates to a paper in PNAS that shows “Human predators outpace other agents of trait change in the wild.”2  The authors warned that human trophy hunting eliminates the big animals, and “might imperil populations, industries, and ecosystems.”  National Geographic news chimed in, asking if hunters are speeding up the evolution of trophy prey.  It seems they can’t decide if evolution is going in forward or reverse.  Either way, there seemed to be an implicit call to do something moral about it.  One natural history museum curator said that sustainable management “requires that people stop preferentially removing the larger and most [fertile] animals from populations, and focus more on a strategy that preserves the historic size-structure of the species.”  He left it unexplained why a theory of undirected change over time in a struggle for existence and the pursuit of fitness would require one species to care about another species on which it does not depend; see the 11/21/2008 entry.1.  Peter J. Bowler, “Darwin’s Originality,” Science, 9 January 2009: Vol. 323. no. 5911, pp. 223-226, DOI: 10.1126/science.1160332.2.  Darimont et al, “Human predators outpace other agents of trait change in the wild,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Published online before print January 12, 2009, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0809235106.First, regarding the hunting article, care for the ecology makes perfect sense to Christians, who believe humans are God’s stewards to care for the animals and plants, because they display God’s creativity and sovereignty.  It makes no sense in a Darwinian world view.  Trophy hunting just shows that humans are more fit.  Lots of animals get smaller through evolution.  So what?  If you believe in an undirected process, with no morals and values, who cares if the big bucks are on the decline?  Must be consistent.  No fair borrowing Christian ideals.  Remember what Fern Wickson told Nature? (11/09/2008) “If nature is somewhere that humans are not, we lose sight of the fact that we are just another species intimately intertwined in the complex web of biological systems on this planet.  However, if we place ourselves within a definition of nature, the definition then becomes essentially meaningless by extending to everything on Earth.”    Now, regarding Bowler’s essay, wow.  Did you get that?  The Darwin Party officials usually turn beet red when anyone tries to link their beliefs to the Holocaust.  They became unglued when Expelled drew a connection.  Now, this philosopher, writing in Science, said the same thing.  Understand that Richard Weikart and the other commentators in the film did not make any kind of simplistic linkage.  They did not blame Darwin for the Holocaust, or say that Hitler’s primary motivation came from Darwin’s book, or any such thing.  They said that Darwin’s world view in which nature ruthlessly destroys the “unfit” in an unending struggle for existence was used by later political leaders to justify their atrocities as a rational outworking of the laws of nature.  That’s what Bowler is admitting here.  Come on, Eugenie and Ken and Barbara and all you other Darwin attack dogs: unleash your venom on this guy, too.  He doesn’t understand what a sweet, gentle, loving theory Darwinism is.    Notice that Bowler called Darwinism a world view, not a scientific theory.  He spoke of Darwin’s supposition that the world operated in an undirected manner.  He depicted Darwin applying a metaphor of struggle in a particular way.  These are instances of the use of scientific rhetoric, not empiricism.  The rhetorical character of Darwin’s presentation of natural selection in The Origin has been described in an excellent interview by John Angus Campbell, PhD in Rhetoric, one of the founders of a post-Kuhnian discipline called the Rhetoric of Science.  The recorded interview is available from Access Research Network and is well worth watching and thinking about.  It will give you a whole new understanding of the Darwinian revolution.    The slogan ideas have consequences is so commonplace, we won’t harp on it.  Instead, we’ll offer the hard core Darwinists a proposition.  We know you are never going to change your world view, but like it or not, you know that Darwinism was used by some of the worst despots in the 20th century to wipe out millions of people.  We know you don’t want that to happen again.  To save the world from the next Pol Pot, Mao or Stalin, how about joining with us in promoting Christianity as an antidote to the selfish tendencies of humans?  You don’t have to believe it, but certainly you can see in retrospect that mankind needs such a world view to provide a moral foundation for the life, liberty and happiness that you enjoy so much.  After all, even Richard Dawkins admitted he would rather live in a Christian society than a Darwinian one.  You guys are obligated to think Christianity provides fitness, because you believe religion evolved (05/27/2008, 10/26/2008).  So here’s our proposition: join a Christian missions team and help spread the gospel.  Save the world from Darwinism!(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sponsorship boost for SA tennis

first_img11 June 2009The South African Tennis Association has received a welcome boost, with the signing of a three-year, R8-million sponsorship deal with medical scheme Keyhealth.The money will be geared towards Davis Cup, junior tennis, and development. Earlier this year, KeyHealth partnered with the South African Tennis Association (Sata) in the SA Open and Davis Cup ties.“This is an absolute win for tennis in South Africa,” Sata chief executive Ian Smith said in a statement this week. “To have KeyHealth as a partner in the resurrection of the sport locally is what SA tennis has been lacking for some time.”‘A growing sport’KeyHealth marketing chairman Peter Sharman explained: “Tennis is a growing sport in South Africa, and we were fortunate to make contact with SA Tennis some 12 months ago and provide them with a small sponsorship to assist them in their efforts to promote tennis throughout the country.“The board of KeyHealth then took the decision to become more involved, especially as there was a need to promote tennis to the underprivileged and provide them with a healthy sporting opportunity on an individual basis,” Sharman said.“Through this initiative we hope to create primary healthcare awareness and a healthy lifestyle for all who are involved, and through the publicity it generates we will bring that awareness to the masses.”Improvement and expansionIn recent years South African tennis has shown encouraging signs of improvement and expansion.The South African Open was revived in 2007 after the country had last hosted an ATP event in 1994. The tournament that year was a challenger event, but in 2009 it enjoyed full ATP Tour status and drew a quality field.Also this year, two challenger tournaments, for men and women, were held at the Arthur Ashe Tennis Complex in Soweto, Johannesburg. It was the first time that world class tennis had been taken to the world famous township.In September, South Africa will face India at home for a place in the World Group of the Davis Cup, the highest level of the international competition. This comes on the back of 10 successive wins in the event since 2006.At the junior level, Chanel Simmonds recently made it to the quarterfinals of the girls’ French Open.Clearly, the trend is up for South African tennis, and a healthy sponsorship will no doubt help stimulate the sport and expand it throughout the country.SAinfo reporter and South African Tennis AssociationWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Mandela: a champion for women’s rights

first_imgNelson Mandela believed South Africa’s freedom would not be achieved if women remained oppressed. This Mandela’s Day presents a great opportunity to advance women’s rights by volunteering at a women’s shelter and even teaching children about women’s rights amongst other activities. (Image: Brand South Africa) • Sello Hatang CEO Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory +27 11 547 5600 www.nelsonmandela.org • Milestones in Mandela’s long walk • Mandela: champion of public health • Index to boost women’s rights • Want to grow Africa’s economy? Include women • Mandela left his mark on many homes Aneshree NaidooThere is a common misconception that feminists are hysterical, man-hating women who burn their bras. But the reality is far different; in fact, one of the world’s greatest leaders, Nelson Mandela, was a passionate feminist. He believed fervently in the ideology’s core commitment to the social, economic and political equality of women.When Mandela became South Africa’s first democratically elected president in 1994, he realised the dreams of millions of black South Africans for political and social equality. He took that dream one step further, when, at the opening of the first democratic parliament in 1994, he said: “Freedom cannot be achieved unless women have been emancipated from all forms of oppression… Our endeavours must be about the liberation of the woman, the emancipation of the man and the liberty of the child.”In 1995, he ratified the United Nations Convention to End All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, which South Africa had signed in 1993. Ratifying a UN convention legally binds signatory countries to put its provisions into practice. This convention is often referred to as the International Bill of Rights for Women.The rights of South African women of all races were enshrined in the country’s world-leading Constitution. Mandela signed the final draft on International Human Rights Day in December 1996. It states: “The state may not unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly against anyone on one or more grounds, including race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.”At the time, recognising the role of women in the struggle against apartheid, and as human beings in their own right, he said: “As a tribute to the legions of women who navigated the path of fighting for justice before us, we ought to imprint in the supreme law of the land, firm principles upholding the rights of women.”The Constitution recognises the rights of women and gender equality, and underscores the rights of homosexuals and transgender South Africans to live lives free from discrimination. Women in the struggle against apartheidWhile the most visible heroes of the fight against apartheid were men like Mandela, South African women, when they rose up, did so in unprecedented numbers and made sure their voices were heard. As early as 1913, black women were protesting against laws that restricted their movements, while women of Indian descent took a stand against laws that would delegitimise their marriages performed under Hindu and Islamic rites. Black women again raised their voices against a government crackdown on home brewing of beer in the 1930s and 1940s.But it wasn’t until 9 August 1956 that the entire world heard the voices of South Africa’s women. On that day, thousands of women of all races marched on the Union Buildings in Pretoria singing in isiXhosa: “Wathint’ abafazi, wathint’ imbokodo” (You strike the women, you strike a rock). Observers on the day estimated that between 10 000 and 20 000 women from across the country gathered to present their objection to the pass laws, which had been extended to include women. These laws severely restricted the freedom of movement of black South Africans; broke up families and created chronic economic hardship, especially for black women.The protest, disciplined and inclusive, shattered the myth that women were politically immature or inept, and in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela described the marchers as “courageous, persistent, enthusiastic, indefatigable and their protest against passes set a standard for anti-government protest that was never equalled”. He honoured the Women’s March participants by declaring the day of the protest – which had been unofficially declared Women’s Day by the Federation of South African Women – an annual public holiday. Walking the talk on women’s rightsMadiba did not just talk the talk; he actively promoted women into his cabinet, and today South Africa’s parliament is one of the most representative in the world. Women make up 44% of the cabinet, not far off from the government’s goal to reach 50-50 gender parity by 2015. Female representation in parliament jumped from just 2.7% during apartheid, to 27% after 1994.While in office, Madiba also recognised the importance of primary health care for women and children. Under his watch, free public health care for pregnant women and for children up to the age of six was introduced. The health care offered to women includes access to reproductive health care, free contraception and abortion. In 1998, free public care was extended to people with disabilities.Recognising that poverty disproportionately affected women and children, especially as a result of apartheid destroying the traditional family structure among black South Africans, he expanded the social security system for more poor children and women. Today, more than 16 million poor South Africans have access to social support. Continuing the fight for women’s rightsAfter retiring from public office in 1999, Mandela, as a global statesman, continued to advocate for women’s rights. In 2006, he received Amnesty International’s Ambassador of Conscience Award, which recognises leaders who advance human rights. On receiving it, he said: “Women and girls need safe environments to learn and to work. At the moment, discrimination and violence exacerbate their lack of access to the very tools they need to make their own rights a reality. If girls do not have a safe and non-discriminatory environment to pursue education or gain employment, the consequences reverberate throughout their lives, denying them the choice and freedom we take for granted.”Mandela’s actions brought women’s rights in South Africa a long way from the days only white women were granted the right to vote under the Women’s Enfranchisement Act of 1930. But while women’s rights are ensured on paper, in reality – much like in the rest of the world – they remain difficult to claim in everyday life. Attitudes about women’s supposed inferiority run deep in virtually all the world’s cultures and women’s rights organisations work continuously to raise awareness that women’s rights are truly human rights. Fight for gender rights this Mandela DayInternational Nelson Mandela Day is a great opportunity to join in the struggle to advance women’s rights by raising awareness of how discrimination and violence against women and children negatively affect society. Consider volunteering at an organisation – the Southern African NGO Network, or SangoNet, has a list of groups that work in the fields of women’s rights and gender rights – or try out these activities:Follow, read, or tweet your stories or experiences of sexism or misogyny with the #YesAllWomen hashtag on Twitter.Join the social media campaign being run by Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust to fight rape culture.Visit the international or South African Everyday Sexism websites to learn more about women’s daily experiences of sexism and misogyny to understand some of the struggles women face.Volunteer to answer calls at a women’s shelter.Volunteer to help out at a women’s shelter.Encourage your children’s schools to teach pupils about gender and women’s rights.Expose your children to inspiring women and women’s history through books and movies.Invite a speaker to your school to talk about women’s and gender rights.last_img read more

Farming crops with rocks to reduce CO2 and improve global food security

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Farming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and capture CO2 from the atmosphere, a new study has found.The pioneering research by scientists at the University of Illinois, together with U.S. and international colleagues, suggests that adding fast-reacting silicate rocks to croplands could capture CO2 and give increased protection from pests and diseases while restoring soil structure and fertility.Stephen Long, Gutgsell Endowed University Professor of Crop Sciences and Plant Biology at U of I and co-author of the study, provides context: “Scientists generally have done a poor job of getting across the point that the world must reduce emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuels and combine this with strategies for extracting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to avoid a climate catastrophe.”David Beerling, Director of the Leverhulme Centre for Climate Change Mitigation at the University of Sheffield and lead author of the research, explains the project: “Human societies have long known that volcanic plains are fertile, ideal places for growing crops without adverse human health effects, but until now there has been little consideration for how adding further rocks to soils might capture carbon.“This study could transform how we think about managing our croplands for climate, food, and soil security. It helps move the debate forward for an under-researched strategy of CO2 removal from the atmosphere — enhanced rock weathering — and highlights supplementary benefits for food and soils. Adopting strategies like this new research could have a massive impact and be adopted rapidly.”The research, published in Nature Plants, examined amending soils with abundant crushed silicate rocks, like basalt, left over from ancient volcanic eruptions. As these minute rock grains dissolve chemically in soils, they take up carbon dioxide and release plant-essential nutrients.Critically, enhanced rock weathering works together with existing managed croplands. Unlike other carbon removal strategies being considered, it doesn’t compete for land used to grow food or increase the demand for fresh water. Other benefits include reducing the usage of agricultural fertilizers and pesticides, lowering the cost of food production, increasing the profitability of farms and reducing the barriers to uptake by the agricultural sector.Crushed silicate rocks could be applied to any soils, but arable land is the most obvious since it is worked and planted annually. It covers approximately 10% of the global land area.Farmers already apply crushed rock in the form of limestone to reverse acidification of soils caused by farming practices, including the use of fertilizers. Managed crops, therefore, have the logistical infrastructure, such as road networks and machinery, needed to undertake this approach at scale. These considerations could make it straightforward to adopt.“Our proposal is that changing the type of rock, and increasing the application rate, would do the same job as applying crushed limestone but help capture CO2 from the atmosphere, storing it in soils and eventually the oceans,” Long said.James Hansen from the Earth Institute at Columbia University and co-author of the work, adds, “Strategies for taking CO2 out of the atmosphere are now on the research agenda and we need realistic assessment of these strategies, what they might be able to deliver, and what the challenges are.”The article, “Farming with crops and rocks to address global climate, food and soil security,” is published in Nature Plants. Researchers participated from U of I, University of Sheffield, Lancaster University, James Cook University, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Columbia University. The work was supported by the Leverhulme Trust.last_img read more

Weekly Wrap-up: The Year the Check-in Died, Twitter Drops Ruby for Java, The Future of the Camera and More…

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 2011: The Year the Check-in DiedOnce Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for JavaFacebook is Great, But Does It Make Businesses Any Money?UX Evolutions: The Future of the CameraApple Hiring a Team to Build “the Future of Cloud Services”More coverage and analysis from ReadWriteWebGet Ready For The ReadWriteWeb 2WAY Summit: June 13-14 in New York City Join ReadWriteWeb for one of the top tech events of the summer. Day one of the summit will feature talks from some of the smartest folks in technology and media, including Fred Wilson, Gawker CEO Nick Denton, Jason Calacanis, danah boyd, Flipboard CEO Mike McCue, Chris Dixon, NPR’s Andy Carvin and more. Day two is all about learning and interaction, with breakout discussions and enriching workshops that cater to all levels of Web knowledge.Visit the event site now for more information and to buy your ticket.LocationWhat to Expect from Where 2.0 in 2011: Context, Crowdsourcing & ProximityCheck-ins Are Dead? Location App Life360 Adds 1 Million Users in 10 WeeksMore Location coverageMobile Tags:#web#Weekly Wrap-ups Using Windows Phone 7: One Week with an HD7HTC Dominating Online Chatter, Says Market Research FirmMore Mobile coverageInternet of ThingsMicrosoft Announces Kinect SDK: Why This is the Future of WindowsThe State of the Internet of Things – Is There Enough Commercial Activity?More Internet of Things coverageCheck Out The ReadWriteWeb iPhone App As well as enabling you to read ReadWriteWeb while on the go or lying on the couch, we’ve made it easy to share ReadWriteWeb posts directly from your iPhone, on Twitter and Facebook using the official ReadWriteWeb iPhone app. You can also follow the RWW team on Twitter, directly from the app. We invite you to download it now from iTunes.ReadWriteEnterpriseReadWriteEnterprise is devoted to enterprise 2.0 and using social software inside organizations. 5 Top Marketing Blogs by Entrepreneurs5 Tools to Improve Your Idea Before You Write a Line of Code4 Tips for Taking Your Startup InternationalReadWriteCloudReadWriteCloud is dedicated to virtualization and cloud computing. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Facebook is Great, But Does It Make Businesses Any Money?How to Manage Your Business’s Presence on BingiContact Offers Free Email Marketing Service for Small BusinessesReadWriteHackReadWriteHack is a resource and guide for developers. Once Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for JavaApple Hiring a Team to Build “the Future of Cloud Services”The Cloud Stratosphere [Infographic]ReadWriteBizReadWriteBiz is a resource and guide for small to medium businesses. All About “Mango:” New Version of Windows Phone Arriving this FalliPad to Dominate Tablet Market Until 2015Nokia Reveals Symbian Update, New Phones & Ovi Store NumbersEnjoy your weekend everyone!Subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-upYou can subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-up by RSS or by email below.RWW Weekly Wrap-up Email Subscription form:center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market ReadWrite Sponsors Related Posts Live Blog: Microsoft MIX 2011 Day 1 – Internet Explorer 10 Preview, and MoreMicrosoft MIXed Messages on Silverlight, Internet Explorer 10Live Blog: Microsoft MIX 2011 Day 2 – New Windows Phone 7 Features, Silverlight 5, Kinect SDKReadWriteMobileReadWriteMobile is dedicated to helping its community understand the strategic business and technical implications of developing mobile applications. Government Agrees With Microsoft: Google Wasn’t Certified [Update]Mixed Reviews for Blackberry’s Tablet, But Will It Be a Good Enterprise Device?IT Poll: Which NoSQL Company Will Be Acquired by a Major Player First?ReadWriteStartReadWriteStart is a resource for startups and entrepreneurs. One of our top posts this week was Richard MacManus’ look at the future of the camera. We all know how smartphones integrated cameras. “Could we be about to see the inverse – cameras integrating smartphone technology?” he asked. The story is part of our ongoing series looking at what it means to consume and produce media in post-PC-centric world.After the jump you’ll find more of this week’s top news stories on some of the key trends that are shaping the Web – mobile, location, Internet of Things – plus highlights from our six channels. Read on for more.Top Stories of the Week A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

AWCC: Rebisco PSL-Manila yields to Hisamitsu Springs

first_imgLakers win 9th straight, hold off Pelicans ‘Coming Home For Christmas’ is the holiday movie you’ve been waiting for, here’s why South Korea to suspend 25% of coal plants to fight pollution The Japanese, playing together as one team as opposed to the Philippine Superliga selection, really stepped on it in the second and third frames, smartly sensing all their opponents’ weakness and pouncing on just about every unguarded spot on the floor.“We have to have that kind of mindset, which is to play with that kind of speed,” said Vicente.All in all, according to Vicente, the Filipinos played very well and should have learned a neat lesson ahead of their goal to land a medal in the Southeast Asian Games in August.RELATED VIDEOS UST-KAMENOGORSK, Kazakhstan — Hisamitsu Springs needed some time to size up Rebisco PSL-Manila but still came up with a performance worthy of a two-time champion team to post a 25-17, 25-10, 25-14 victory Thursday at the start of the Asian Women’s Club Championships.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThe Filipino spikers, led by 6-foot-5 Jaja Santiago, briefly took control in the first set, 9-6, and kept the game close through her unstoppable attacks and occasional net drops by Kim Fajardo.But that was not enough to keep Rebisco abreast with the 2002 and 2014 titlist which soon employed its almost flawless, and systematic defense at the Boris Alxeandrov Sports Palace. More than 5,000 measles deaths in DR Congo this year — WHO Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes Santiago scored 16 points for the Filipinos who are coming into the tournaments without an import. Fajardo had four points and 11 excellent sets, while Ces Molina, Rhea Dimaculangan and Jovelyn Gonzaga each had three points.Mika Reyes and Rachel Anne Daquis both scored two points, while Aiza Pontillas added one for Rebisco which had 18 errors, mostly on attacks.Coach Francis Vicente to Rebisco PSL You didn’t play badly. You just lacked speed and volleyball IQ. Napainit nyo ulo nung Hapon. Be proud. PHOTO BY MARC REYES“Why are you so sad?” asked head coach Francis Vicente during the post-game huddle inside the locker room. “You learned from them. You didn’t play badly. We just need more speed. More volleyball IQ. You got the Japanese coach worried in the first set. Be proud.”Middle blocker Fumika Moriya led the Japan club with 14 points, while Yuka Taura and Yuka Imamura chipped in 12 and 11 markers, respectively.Erika Sakae tossed 33 excellent sets to set Hisamitsu’s offence flowing and wreaking havoc against Rebisco.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: PH beats Indonesia, enters gold medal round in polo Man United fans celebrate triumph after tragedy MOST READ Libero Denden Lazaro assesses the match pic.twitter.com/OXyPFXuHHW— Marc Anthony Reyes (@marcreyesINQ) May 25, 2017ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games LOOK: Vhong Navarro’s romantic posts spark speculations he’s marrying longtime GF Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

Essex County Sheriffs Department Partners With Middlesex Sheriffs Office To Complete Interactive Training

first_imgMIDDLETON, MA — 87 members of the Essex County Sheriff’s Department (ECSD) have completed an interactive firearms training organized in conjunction with the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office (MSO), Sheriffs Kevin F. Coppinger and Peter J. Koutoujian announced this week.The training was held on the MSO’s Mobile Training Center (MTC), a specialized trailer that allows officers to practice their responses to critical incidents. MSO officers who operate the MTC can offer unique scenarios for each user to test their firearm, communication and de-escalation skills.“We are proud to share this resource with our law enforcement colleagues at ECSD. Our agencies regularly participate in trainings together, from our Crisis Intervention Training program to continuing education opportunities for staff, but this represents a new avenue for partnership,” said Sheriff Koutoujian. “This training allows officers to work through real life scenarios and practice their responses to a serious incident, all while receiving constructive feedback from ECSD instructors and MSO officers.”The MTC was stationed at the Middleton House of Correction from April 22 – May 3. ECSD staff practiced scenarios specifically tailored for the environments that deputies operate in, such as construction details which may involve a traffic encounter and inmate transportation.“Providing the most advanced training to our correctional officers is a priority of our department. We continually strive to provide high quality, situational training to our officers. Sharing this interactive training platform is an example of how Sheriffs’ Departments in the Commonwealth collaborate for the benefit of public safety,” said Sheriff Kevin Coppinger.In 2018, 19 police departments were trained through the MTC. So far this year, nine agencies – including the Essex County Sheriff’s Department – have utilized the MTC for at least one week of training.Photo L to R: ECSD Special Sheriff William Gerke, MSO Firearms Instructors Officers Frank Reid, Chris Hardy, Ret. Sgt. Don Cook, ECSD Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger with ECSD Firearms Instructors Sgt. Jim Comeau, Security Investigator Jason Frampton, Security Investigator John Zaccari, Capt. Shelley Ehlers, Capt. Tom Cote, Assistant Superintendent/Director of Training Christine Arsenault.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMiddlesex Sheriff’s Office Receives State Grant For Popular Youth Summer CampIn “Police Log”Attorney General Awards Middlesex Sheriff’s Office A Healthy Summer Youth Jobs GrantIn “Police Log”51 Wilmington Students Graduate From Middlesex Sheriff’s Youth Public Safety AcademyIn “Government”last_img read more