Our Oil Discovery, Our Hope

first_imgThree decades and three years ago, Liberians demonstrated an intolerable behavior against the tampering with our stable food rice. It was an act which served as a caveat that Liberians, at any moment, are willing and ready to stand on their feet against whatever forces that tend to reduce the size of their stomach.Today, there is a mental shift from what pleases and satisfies our bellies to what benefits our economy and improves our lives. Interestingly, that is non-edible oil, crude oil. Our crude oil discovery has sparked hot debates among Liberians both in and out of Liberia. Liberians from all walks of life have been seen on street corners, in attayah shops, on university campuses  and even in churches expressing their views on how the oil revenues should be managed and/or allocated to benefit the general populace. The question that has been frequently asked is, “Is our oil discovery a blessing or a curse?” This question arises from ugly situations that have been witnessed in other African countries including Nigeria, North and South Sudan, D.R. Congo, among others, in which there were bloodshed, and destruction of infrastructures and institutions after oil wasdiscovered in those countries.In an attempt to take a  cue from those countries’ experiences, Liberians tend to be vigilant and proactive so that our fragile and enjoyable peace will not degenerate into decadence simply because of misappropriation and mismanagement of oil revenues. Sometime in October and November 2013, the Liberian Legislature led a nationwide consultative and awareness campaign in all counties to solicit the candid views of ordinary Liberians with regards to the new petroleum laws; a process which was greeted with mixed  reactions.While some Liberians welcomed  and commended the process; others rejected and scorned the process as ridiculous, based on the contention that they weren’t given copies of the new petroleum law to read and digest. Many  opined that the process was a waste of tax payers’ money. It was unofficially reported on local media that US$1.2 million was given to the Legislature for the process. This amount most Liberians considered as too much for a consultation process when in fact many Liberians are wallowing far below the economic ladder in destitution.However, our law makers returned from their trip around the country announcing success in their excursion. While it is necessary to consider seriously the proper management of our oil revenues, it is also very germane to invest more in the success of the discovery process. I mean investment in the human resource capacity; the training and placement of brilliant, talented and young Liberians.The recent discovery of crude oil by African Petroleum in our off-shore basin is a laudable achevement. As reported to the general public, the discovery was within the Albian and Turonian strata. Our basin, which is located within the Gulf of Guinea,  provides a reasonable consideration for possible commercial volume of oil reserves. After a thorough research study in the area, it is now believed that the Gulf of Guinea contains about three to four billion barrels of crude oil.However, the onus is upon our stake holders to put into place a proper modus operandi or mechanism that will ensure that our oil discovery is a success.According to resource classification, our resources are at present considered prospective resources. Prospective resources are those quantities of petroleum which are estimated as of a given date to be potentially recoverable from undiscovered accumulations. The progression is from prospective resources to contingent resources to Reserves. Each stage requires the expertise of qualified petroleum engineers (reservoir and drilling engineers), petro-physicists, geologists and  petroleum geochemists, among others. Additionally, the utilization of modern sophisticated technologies and software are required. The process might take five to ten years to develop a production well if our oil is of commercial quantity, and there is political stability.Even though the resources within the earth subsurface are yet to be quantified, Liberians have started to raise eyebrows with  regards to the exorbitant expenditure of our oil revenue on nationwide consultation. The Liberians’ hope is that the revenues generated from our crude oil will be used to better the lives of ordinary Liberians and improve the economy.This shared hope has been reflected in our struggle for balanced participation, justice, and equal opportunities, among others. This struggle,  which has been described in our history as the ugly past, saw hideous crimes being perpetrated by Liberians on their fellow countrymen. This led to the massive destruction of lives, properties and institutions. A bitter resentment and lack of trust have developed in the hearts of many Liberians simply because of the cruel and uncivilized behavior demonstrated toward one another.However, after ten years of relative peace, Liberians have seen a prospect for better living and the hope to enjoy their family union and community   cooperation. National leaders are now obliged to provide the enabling environment where all Liberians can realize their potential and contribute to rebuilding of Mama Liberia.ABOUT THE AUTHOR:M. Dokie Mulbah is a summa cum laude Natural Science and Mathematicsgraduate of Cuttington University, who recently returned from the People’s Republic of China with the Master’s degree in Petroleum Engineering.  He is currently in conversation with the National Oil Company, including its President, Dr. Randolph McClain, toward engagement to contribute Dokie’s quota to the just and efficient development and exploitation of Liberia’s petroleum resource.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Shoplifters hit up Chrome Store for Facebook data

first_img © 2012 PhysOrg.com Then Kaspersky’s Fabio Assolini, a lab expert, said one bit of malware especially caught his team’s attention because the malicious extension was hosted on Google’s own Chrome Web Store. “At this time,” Assolini said in a March 23 blog, “the malicious app has 923 users.”The extension presented itself as Adobe Flash Player. After installation, the extension could gain complete control of the victim’s profile first by downloading a script file. The script file had instructions to send commands to the victim’s Facebook profile. The result was the eventual spread of a malicious message, inviting more users to install the fake extension. So what’s in such a scheme for the malware makers? Profit, in the form of selling Facebook “likes” to businesses looking for (ironically) a reputation boost and may be willing to pay the $27 charged for 1,000 “likes.”According to reports, Google personnel removed the malicious extension after Kaspersky informed them of the hustle – titled Trojan.JS.Agent.bxo—which the Kaspersky experts had discovered on March 6 in a previous similar attack.According to Ars Technica, a Google response was, “When we detect items containing malware or learn of them through reports, we remove them from the Chrome Web Store and from active Chrome instances. We’ve already removed several of these extensions, and we are improving our automated systems to help detect them even faster.” Beyond the Store, one security plus for Google was the launch, earlier this year, of Bouncer, which scans the Android Market for malicious apps. The scan happens when developers first upload an app to the Market and then periodically after that.The Bouncer safeguard does not, however, seem to console observers over thieves who find ways to outsmart Facebook and Google.Those behind the cash-for-likes scheme “are uploading new extensions regularly, in a cat and mouse game,” said Kaspersky’s Assolini.Kaspersky Lab noticed a “huge wave” of attacks in Brazil. Without naming the miscreants, Assolini’s column warning users to “think twice” before installing Chrome extensions simply referred to “Brazil’s bad guys” turning their attention to Chrome and Facebook, which are now Brazil’s two key go-to places on the Internet. Recent statistics show that Google Chrome has become the most popular browser in Brazil with more than 45 percent of market share. Facebook is the most popular social network in Brazil, with 42 million users, displacing Orkut. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: www.securelist.com/en/blog/208 … ng_Chrome_extensions Microsoft anti-virus program evicts Chrome browsercenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — A cash-for-Facebook’s-“likes” hustle hanging out in Google Chrome Web Store has been discovered by Kaspersky Lab. The researchers first discovered extensions leading to the wave of hijackings under an umbrella of assorted themes that were targeting users of Chrome and Facebook. They were rolling out malicious extensions for use to nab Facebook profile data. The lure was in the form of invitations for users to make changes on their profile or to see who was visiting their profile or to remove a virus from their Facebook profile. Citation: Shoplifters hit up Chrome Store for Facebook data (2012, March 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-shoplifters-chrome-facebook.html Explore furtherlast_img read more