Streetiquette teaches people about road safety

first_imgOne of the performances for Streetiquette is “Little Red Riding Hood crossing the street”. (Image: Open Streets Cape Town)A campaign to raise awareness of pedestrian safety is under way in Cape Town to minimise the risks pedestrians face in the streets.The campaign, aptly named Streetiquette, is inspired by a popular form of engagement in Latin America in which colourful performances and interactive theatre are used to tackle unsafe and irresponsible behaviour on urban streets by motorists and pedestrians. The campaign aims to trigger self-observation, self-reflection and, ultimately, self-education, and has been adapted for local audiences.It is a collaborative effort between the Western Cape government, its Department of Transport and Public Works, and Open Streets Cape Town (OSCT), a citizen-driven initiative working to change how streets are used, perceived and experienced.STREET PERFORMANCESThe performances started on 23 November and end on 3 December at five busy CBD intersections. They are directed by Mandisi Sindo, the artistic director of Theatre4Change Therapeutic Theatre.A soccer referee, a gogo and Red Riding Hood will be among the characters who bring the campaign to life. They will interact with pedestrians at the intersections of Darling and Buitenkant streets, Darling and Plein streets, Wale and Long streets, Adderley and Bureau streets, and at the pedestrian crossing near Parliament on Plein Street. A “finale” will take place on 3 December at the intersection of Bree and Wale streets.“We are anticipating an atmosphere of fun and hope Streetiquette will start an important conversation that everyone becomes a part of,” said Marcela Guerrero Casas, co-founder and managing director of OSCT.To get involved in the action on social media, tune into the hashtags #WalkSafe, #SafeRoadsForAll and #Streetiquette and keep an eye on www.twitter.com/OpenStreetsCT.CAPE TOWN PEDESTRIANSAccording to the Western Cape government, over 2 800 pedestrians were hit by vehicles in central Cape Town from 2005 to 2014, which means a pedestrian has been struck in the area approximately every 28 hours for the past 10 years. More than 450 of these cases resulted in serious injuries.“The Open Streets Cape Town manifesto states our strong belief that streets can be more than they are. The way we interact on those streets is the result of a combination of infrastructure regulation and human behaviour,” said Guerrero Casas.“We believe that embedding respect in our streets can lead us to truly change them as public spaces that are inclusive and conducive to a prosperous society.”Above all, it was a safer system we must develop, said Donald Grant, the provincial minister of transport and public works. “Right now, in the contexts of the National Development Plan, national, provincial and departmental strategic plans, we are developing the right models for the province to link legislation, institutional frameworks, infrastructure, district safety planning, public transport, population level communications and above all, data-driven intelligence and evidence, in such a way as to build a safe system that keeps people as its central focus.“Such a system must be based on evidence and best practice, yet allow for innovation, for trial and error, as we make our way forward,” he said.last_img read more

Mead to serve as CEO of Ohio Federation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Federation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts (OFSWCD) is pleased to announce Janelle Teeters Mead has assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer.“Janelle has a wealth of experience which will help lead our organization in this next chapter. Weare excited to have her in this position,” said Bob Short, President.Growing up on her family’s row-crop farm in Fayette County, Mead has always been interested in agriculture. Most recently, Mead served as the deputy director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Her responsibilities included overseeing the department’s animal health, communications, legislative, and marketing efforts, and shaping department policy. Mead has also worked for the OhioFarm Bureau Federation, The Ohio State Alumni Association and Mycogen Seeds. She is a graduate of The Ohio State University where she earned a degree in agricultural communications. She and her family live in Fayette County.“I am excited to work with our conservation partners throughout the state during this very important time. We have many opportunities to do great things in our communities and for the industries we care so much about. I am excited to be here and continue the great work of the Federation,” Mead said.The OFSWCD is a non-profit organization providing support and assistance to Ohio’s 88 county Soil and Water Conservation Districts. County SWCDs provide a variety of conservation related assistance and programs to landowners and user’s of Ohio’s working lands — working hard to keep soils productive and waters clean throughout the state of Ohio. For more information on the OFSWCD, please contact Alison Foster, Operations Coordinator, at 614-784-1900.last_img read more

Congress candidate leading in Dantewada Assembly bypoll

first_imgThe Congress candidate was leading by a margin of 2,778 votes in the Dantewada Assembly bypoll where counting was taken up on Friday morning, officials said. The counting of votes in the bypoll held on September 23 in the Naxal-affected seat began at 8 at the District Institute of Education and Training (DIET) campus in Dantewada district headquarters,a poll official said. As per the early trends, Devti Karma of the Congress was leading by a margin of 2,778 votes against her nearest rival Ojaswi Mandavi of the BJP, he said. Ms. Karma had secured 6,720 votes, while Ms. Mandavi got 3942 votes after initial rounds of counting, he added. The ruling Congress and main opposition BJP are locked in a direct fight in this seat, reserved for Scheduled Tribe, where bypoll was necessitated after the death of sitting BJP MLA Bhima Mandavi in a Maoist attack in April this year.last_img read more

6 days agoSilva safe as Everton defeat West Ham

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Silva safe as Everton defeat West Hamby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton eased the pressure on manager Marco Silva with an impressive win over disappointing West Ham United at Goodison Park.Silva is fighting to ease doubts over his future after four straight Premier League defeats plunged Everton into the relegation zone – but this was a vastly-improved, excellent display to earn three vital points.He made five changes from the side that lost at Burnley and was rewarded with a piece of individual brilliance from recalled Brazilian Bernard, who tricked his way into the West Ham area before beating keeper Roberto Jimenez with a clever finish after 17 minutes to set Everton on their way.Everton had numerous opportunities to extend their advantage but Roberto produced a succession of fine saves, especially from Tom Davies and Alex Iwobi, while Richarlison hit the woodwork. It was in stoppage time that second-half substitute Gylfi Sigurdsson, dropped for the first time since he became Everton’s record £45m signing in summer 2017, ended any doubts about the outcome with a magnificent 25-yard rising right-foot drive.Everton attacker Theo Walcott said at the final whistle: “The game felt like we need to start taking our chances, we had so many. It showed how good we can be going forwards. We know the quality in the team, we know what to expect from each other.”The fans were fantastic today, but then they always are. The sense of urgency was what we needed.”last_img read more

2 days agoJuventus watching Tottenham youngster Troy Parrott

first_imgJuventus watching Tottenham youngster Troy Parrottby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus are watching Tottenham youngster Troy Parrott.The Irish teen is yet to make a first team appearance for Mauricio Pochettino in the Premier League.The striker is being earmarked as one of Spurs’ most promising youngsters and there is hope he can break into the first team before the end of the season.Calciomercato says Juventus have been impressed by the youngster and will continue to monitor his development.The report claims the Bianconeri are interested in the Irishman and are deciding on whether to make a move when the transfer window reopens. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Kohli says blow on thumb not of serious concern should be fine

first_imgPort of Spain: Captain Virat Kohli said the blow to his right thumb during India’s successful run chase against the West Indies in the third ODI here has not resulted in a fracture and he “should be good” to play in the first Test starting on August 22.In the 27th over of India’s run chase, Kohli was hit on the right thumb by a Kemar Roach bouncer. The Indian captain was seen to be having some pain but after being attended to by the physio, he continued batting to lead India to a series-clinching six-wicket win. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”I don’t think it’s a fracture otherwise I wouldn’t have continued (batting). It’s just a split of the nail,” Kohli said at the post-match presentation ceremony on Wednesday.Asked about the condition of his thumb at the post-match press conference, he said. “Luckily, it’s not broken. When I got hit I thought it was worse than what it turned out to be. But it’s not broken so I should be good for the first Test.” Kohli hit 114 from 99 balls, his 43rd ODI century and second of the series after the 120 in the second match here, which guided India to a 59-run win under D/L method.India won the three-match ODI series 2-0.The first Test between the two sides begins on August 22 at North Sound.last_img read more

US home building slides 37 per cent in April

first_imgWASHINGTON – U.S. builders broke ground on fewer apartment buildings last month, pushing overall home construction down 3.7 per cent from March.The Commerce Department said Wednesday that housing starts fell to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.29 million in April, lowest since December. Apartment construction tumbled 12.6 per cent to 374,000. Construction of single-family homes blipped up 0.1 per cent to 894,000.Still, housing starts are up 10.5 per cent from April 2017 on a 7.2 per cent increase in single-family homes, and a 19.1 per cent surge in apartments.Home construction has grown steadily since the housing crash hit bottom in 2012. The pace of homebuilding is still below its long-run average of about 1.5 million a year, which has led to a shortage of homes on the market. Home builders are struggling with higher prices for lumber and other building materials and a shortage of skilled labourers.A healthy job market is giving Americans the confidence to shop for houses. Millennials are increasingly moving out on their own to buy their own homesDemand for housing is strong despite an uptick in mortgage rates: The rate on the benchmark 30-year, fixed-rate home loan is 4.55 per cent, up from 4.05 per cent a year ago.“We expect housing starts to continue to gain ground through 2018, supported by positive fundamentals such as low unemployment and healthy wage increases, which are expected to offset higher mortgage rates,” Leslie Preston, senior economist at TD Economics, wrote in a research note. “At the same time, tight inventories and rising prices will continue to support homebuilding.”In April, housing starts fell 16.3 per cent in the Midwest, 12 per cent in the West and 8.1 per cent in the Northeast. They rose 6.4 per cent in the South.Building permits, an indicator of future construction, fell 1.8 per cent in April to a seasonally adjusted 1.35 million.last_img read more

Unusual killer spring frost damages crops in fields across the Maritimes

first_imgAn unusual “killer” frost has caused widespread damage to crops in the Maritimes, with everything from Nova Scotian wine grapes to Island asparagus harmed by a sharp plunge in spring temperatures.Farmers were beginning to assess the toll from the June cold front that hit Monday, as word came from Environment Canada of yet another frost advisory for early Thursday in all of Atlantic Canada.“It’s the beginning of the year and it’s a bad time for something like this to happen, just as the growing season begins,” Keith Colwell, Nova Scotia’s minister of agriculture, said in a telephone interview Wednesday.Gerry McConnell, founder of Benjamin Bridge vineyards, said the frost caused significant damage to his wine grapes in the Gaspereau Valley.“The temperatures across Nova Scotia did drop down to -2 C and in some places -4 C. Those are killer frost temperatures,” he said.“But it happened in variable ways … Some vineyards were hit much harder than others.”Curtis Millen, a strawberry and blueberry farmer in Great Village, N.S., has been trying to rescue his crops from a series of cold, wet days that included Monday’s frost.He has a water system to warm the buds of his strawberries, but which caused the plants to be caked in ice Monday morning. Photographs of plants on the morning the temperatures plummeted show strawberry leaves shining under a coat of ice.He now needs days of sun to dry out the fields and allow the crops to absorb nutrients.“We’ve got damage from frost and we have damage also from overhead irrigation trying to keep the frost off and wetting the plants to death,” he said Wednesday as he worked on his roughly 80 hectares of strawberries about 30 kilometres northwest of Truro.He estimated one-third of his strawberry crop would be damaged, adding that other farmers without the overhead, anti-frost immigration system have incurred much greater losses. His blueberry losses are even more extensive, he said.Ian Hubbard, a meteorologist at Environment Canada, said record lows were set early Monday. In Kentville, N.S., it dropped to almost -2 C, marking a huge shift from the 28 C high on Friday that had set off a growth spurt in a wide variety of crops before the frost hit.Mathew Vankoughnett, a researcher with the applied geomatics research group at Nova Scotia Community College, says such a rapid temperature flip is rare.His research indicates that Greenwood, N.S., in the centre of the Annapolis Valley, only had one similar episode in 1978 when temperatures fell below 0 on June 2.“We expect this type of spell to occur in April and maybe early May, but not June,” he said in an email.Larry Lutz, president of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association, has an apple farm south of Berwick in the Annapolis Valley. He said his Rockland farm and others at higher elevation suffered little to no damage as a result of the freeze, but added it was a different story for farms at lower elevations.“On the valley floor it hit between -3 C and -5 C, which at that point you would see in excess of 90 per cent damage,” he said. “So the growers on the valley floor suffered significant damage.”Lutz said cherry, plumb and pear growers are experiencing the same problems.He said he examined one pear farm Wednesday, finding it likely lost all but 10 to 20 per cent of the crop.McConnell, who is also the vice-chairman of the Winery Association of Nova Scotia, said many of the province’s roughly 15 vineyards were also affected, with harm varying from complete devastation to minimal damage.He said it will be several weeks before he can estimate the extent of the damage to the crops, in part because it remains to be seen how secondary and tertiary buds will fare.In P.E.I., Matt Hughes with the Island’s federation of agriculture in Charlottetown, said damage is being tallied up.“I lost the remainder of my asparagus crop. The frost ended my asparagus crop pretty abruptly. I started a few weeks ago and got some harvest off,” he said in an interview from his farm at Kellys Cross, 30 kilometres east of Charlottetown.“We had two major frosts here and it’s ruined three of my four cutting dates. I would have had four harvests before this frost.”Hughes said farmers grow used to some of the challenges associated with weather fluctuations, but this spring has been especially tough.“I grew up on a farm and we always get up and down years, but this seems to be an extreme year.”— With files from Alison Auld and Keith Doucette.last_img read more

Elon Musk proposes Los Angeles tunnel to Dodger Stadium

first_imgLOS ANGELES, Calif. – Traffic-weary baseball fans could someday travel to and from Dodger Stadium on a public transportation system underneath Los Angeles — if Elon Musk’s latest bold plan comes to fruition.The billionaire’s Boring Company tweeted a proposal Wednesday for autonomous, zero-emissions electric sleds that would run through a tunnel between the stadium and a location in the city’s Hollywood area.The company says the so-called Dugout Loop system would be privately funded and not require tax money.Mayor Eric Garcetti tweeted that it’s exciting to see innovative ideas aimed at reducing traffic on LA roads.A proposal to build a gondola from Union Station to Dodger Stadium was announced in April.Musk is currently building a test tunnel from his SpaceX rocket plant to a point near Los Angeles International Airport.last_img read more

Usable groundwater rapidly depleting in north east India IIT study

first_imgNew Delhi: India’s northern and eastern states saw a rapid decline in usable groundwater between 2005 and 2013, raising an impending risk of severe droughts, food crisis, and drinking water scarcity for millions of people, researchers have found.A team from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, West Bengal and Athabasca University, Canada, compiled the first estimates of usable groundwater storage (UGWS) at the state-level across all of India using both in situ and satellite-based measurements. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Groundwater-level data was used from 3,907 in situ monitoring wells across the country and the total UGWS was estimated between 2005 and 2013. The estimate shows rapid depletion of UGWS in Assam, Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and West Bengal. In these areas, increases in agricultural food productions have resulted at the cost of non-renewable loss in groundwater volume at an alarming rate, the researchers wrote in the study published in the journal Advances in Water Resources. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KOn the other hand, southern and western Indian states like Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Chattisgarh show replenishing usable groundwater storage trends. Earlier works by the government agencies have only been able to estimate the total groundwater, only a part of which is usable for human purposes, said lead researcher Abhijit Mukherjee, Associate Professor Hydrogeology, Department of Geology and Geophysics, IIT Kharagpur. “The estimates show rapid depletion of usable groundwater storage during 2005-2013 in most of northern parts, losing 8.5 cubic kilometre per year (km3/year) of total groundwater, and eastern parts which lost 5 km3/year of total groundwater,” Mukherjee told PTI. He emphasised that more than 85 per cent of the groundwater usage in India is linked with irrigation abstraction practices. India is the largest user of groundwater in the world. It uses an estimated 230 km3 of groundwater per year — over a quarter of the global total. Groundwater being an essential natural resource for irrigational water supply during non-monsoonal months, large-scale depletion could have unforeseen consequences in future food security, said Mukherjee. “Underground water is definitely declining in Rajasthan at faster rate. There are pockets in UP which have seen a dip in groundwater table as well,” agreed Dr N C Ghosh, former Head of Hydrology, National Institute of Hydrology (NIH), Roorkee, who was not involved in the study. The problem, Ghosh said, is compounded by over-exploitation of the ground water. “About 85 per cent of rural drinking water needs and 65 per cent of irrigation needs and 50 per cent of urban drinking water and industrial needs are fulfilled from the ground water,” he said. Mukherjee noted that rapid depletion in UGWS would accelerate the decline in food production and availability of drinking water, two of the prime goals of achieving UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030. “More than 120 million people would get affected only in the Gangetic states,” he said. The study combined borehole data from Central Ground Water Board, rainfall data and satellite data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), a pair of satellites launched in 2002. A northeastern state like Assam, which was regarded always as water-affluent, has lost two per cent of its usable groundwater resource, and is at the brink of suffering drought and famine in impending years, said researchers, including first author Soumendra N Bhanja from Department of Geology and Geophysics, IIT Kharagpur. PTIlast_img read more