Khan fears for McGregor in Mayweather bout

first_imgSEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Khan’s fears reflect wider misgivings by some in the boxing community who believe Saturday’s money-spinning superfight should never have been sanctioned on safety grounds.The head of the Association of Ringside Physicians, Larry Lovelace, is among those who believe Nevada should not have granted a licence to the fight.“We were very surprised this bout was even sanctioned and was going to be permitted to carry on,” Lovelace was quoted as saying by the New York Times.“The thing I really fear, truly fear, is that somebody’s going to get really hurt.”The Nevada State Athletic Commission, which sanctioned the fight, has a financial interest in the fight going ahead, earning a slice of the gross ticket receipts.ADVERTISEMENT Conor McGregor stands on stage during a weigh-in Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Las Vegas. McGregor is scheduled to fight Floyd Mayweather Jr. in a boxing bout Saturday. (AP Photo/John Locher)LAS VEGAS — British boxer Amir Khan fears Conor McGregor could face serious injury as the Irishman prepares to face Floyd Mayweather here Saturday.Former light-welterweight world champion Khan told the MMA Hour television show Friday he believed mixed martial arts star McGregor could be hurt in what he expects will be a one-sided meeting with Mayweather in Las Vegas.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses McGregor has never fought in a professional boxing contest and is a huge underdog against Mayweather, a 49-0 fighter regarded as one of the best boxers in history.“It’s like a tennis player trying to play badminton,” Khan said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“So he (McGregor) should not show too much too balls in this fight. If he starts getting a beating — step out man,” he added.“He needs to think about himself in this fight, because if he gets seriously injured, he might not ever be the same fighter or he might not even fight again.” Amir Khan claims Manny Pacquiao has agreed to Saudi Arabia bout PLAY LIST 01:05Amir Khan claims Manny Pacquiao has agreed to Saudi Arabia bout00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games View comments With the bout expected to bring in more than $60 million at the gate, the commission could earn as much as $1.2 million.But Bob Bennett, the executive director of the commission, hit back at suggestions of a conflict of interest.“As a regulator, I take offense to the fact that we’re approving this fight for fiduciary reasons,” Bennett said. “That’s totally unfair, and it’s simply not true.” SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games MOST READ Read Next LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Phoenix Suns guard Knight to miss season after knee op LATEST STORIES Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

Samsung Galaxy M40 may launch in India on June 11 with a punch-hole display

first_imgSamsung is expected to further expand its portfolio this year by announcing the Galaxy M40 soon. While the company is yet to confirm the Galaxy M40’s existence, it seems a popular YouTuber has managed to get his hands on the upcoming device, revealing some key specs about the Galaxy M40 as well as its launch date in India. The Galaxy M40 is tipped to launch in India on June 11.YouTuber Technical Guruji published a video recently where he shows off the alleged Galaxy M40’s design. The video reveals that the Galaxy M40 will come with a punch-hole display like the Galaxy A60 and Galaxy S10-series. The hole can be seen on the top left corner and it will be used to house a selfie camera. The rest of the Infinity-O display is bezel-less and Samsung will most likely be using an AMOLED panel.The back of the Galaxy M40 is shown to be of a glossy glass-like design. We also note a triple camera setup and a rear-mounted fingerprint sensor. The Galaxy M40, the YouTuber says, will be powered by a Snapdragon 675 chipset, which is something we have heard previously as well. Additionally, the Galaxy M40 is rumoured to come with up to 6GB of RAM, 128GB of internal storage and will ship with Android Pie with One UI on top.Earlier this month, it was reported that the Galaxy M40 will be priced under Rs 25,000. The YouTuber, on the other hand, expects the price of the Galaxy M40 to be around Rs 20,000. If the Galaxy M40 is indeed launching in India on June 11, Samsung should start teasing the device any day now.advertisementALSO READ | Samsung Galaxy A50 gets a price cut in India, now starts at Rs 18,490ALSO READ | Samsung Galaxy M40 with 6.3-inch display, Galaxy A10s tipped to launch in India soonlast_img read more

Adrian Grenier And Kate Walsh Attend Oceana Ball

first_imgOceana, the largest international organization dedicated solely to protecting the world’s oceans, is pleased to announce the total amount realized at this weeks’s Inaugural Oceana Ball.The star-studded affair raised close to $1 million in proceeds via the live auction of fantasy lots curated by Oceana. Proceeds of this year’s gala directly benefit the protection and restoration of shark populations.“Oceana is delighted with the success of the Inaugural Oceana Ball and of its companion online auction at Charitybuzz.com, which runs through April 17. We are grateful to everyone who has raised a paddle, made an online bid, or helped bring attention to the cause,” said Oceana CEO, Andy Sharpless. “This support will help Oceana win policy victories to help protect sharks, many species of which are under threat around the world.”Co-chaired by Oceana Ambassador, Kate Walsh, David & Susan Rockefeller, and Steven & Anne Murphy, the auction was officiated by Christie’s charity auctioneer and Director of Strategic Partnerships, Lydia Fenet. After the bidding, the audience enjoyed a special musical performance by O.C.A.D. featuring Olivia Cipolla, who is set to release a new album this summer.Event attendees included: Susan & David Rockefeller, Kate Walsh, Steven & Anne Murphy, Chris Hemsworth, Elsa Pataky, Luke Hemsworth, Adrian Grenier, Sami Gayle, Les Stroud, Almudena Fernandez, Alexandra Cousteau, Jennifer Tilly, and Cameron Silver.The opportunity to have lunch with President Clinton and Susan & David Rockefeller at Blue Hill at Stone Barns swept the evening sale with a winning bid of $110,000. Other fantasy lots, generously provided by JW Marriott Hotels and Resorts, with trips to their properties in Cancun, Costa Rica, Thailand, Ihilani and Dubai generating nearly $40,000.The Oceana Ball will continue raising funds online at Charitybuzz.com/Oceana through April 17. Lots in the online auction include: Artwork from Peter Lik, Isack Kousnsky, Deborah Buck, Laura Bombier, and David Foox, three custom surfboards from artist Peter Tunney, jewelry and timepieces from Shirley Ephraim, Susan Rockefeller and CORUM, getaways from JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts and more.The Oceana Ball focused its attention for the inaugural year on shark conservation, an issue highlighted last year at the third and final Green Auction hosted by Christie’s. Fueled by the support from last year’s event, Oceana made significant progress by helping advance the west coast population of great white sharks to its current position as candidate for the Endangered Species Act. Recent studies show that there may be as few as 350 adult white sharks left in the west coast population. An Endangered Species Act listing will afford the sharks additional safeguards from key threats and garner more funding for research to better understand the status and threats to this distinct population. Proceeds generated from this year’s event will aid Oceana’s efforts to secure protection for this specific population of sharks and others.The initiative was made possible through the joint efforts of Oceana together with Charitybuzz and Christie’s, in addition to the support of all of the visionary leaders from the worlds of art, business, fashion, philanthropy, conservation and celebrity.last_img read more

Unusual killer spring frost damages crops in fields across the Maritimes

first_imgAn unusual “killer” frost has caused widespread damage to crops in the Maritimes, with everything from Nova Scotian wine grapes to Island asparagus harmed by a sharp plunge in spring temperatures.Farmers were beginning to assess the toll from the June cold front that hit Monday, as word came from Environment Canada of yet another frost advisory for early Thursday in all of Atlantic Canada.“It’s the beginning of the year and it’s a bad time for something like this to happen, just as the growing season begins,” Keith Colwell, Nova Scotia’s minister of agriculture, said in a telephone interview Wednesday.Gerry McConnell, founder of Benjamin Bridge vineyards, said the frost caused significant damage to his wine grapes in the Gaspereau Valley.“The temperatures across Nova Scotia did drop down to -2 C and in some places -4 C. Those are killer frost temperatures,” he said.“But it happened in variable ways … Some vineyards were hit much harder than others.”Curtis Millen, a strawberry and blueberry farmer in Great Village, N.S., has been trying to rescue his crops from a series of cold, wet days that included Monday’s frost.He has a water system to warm the buds of his strawberries, but which caused the plants to be caked in ice Monday morning. Photographs of plants on the morning the temperatures plummeted show strawberry leaves shining under a coat of ice.He now needs days of sun to dry out the fields and allow the crops to absorb nutrients.“We’ve got damage from frost and we have damage also from overhead irrigation trying to keep the frost off and wetting the plants to death,” he said Wednesday as he worked on his roughly 80 hectares of strawberries about 30 kilometres northwest of Truro.He estimated one-third of his strawberry crop would be damaged, adding that other farmers without the overhead, anti-frost immigration system have incurred much greater losses. His blueberry losses are even more extensive, he said.Ian Hubbard, a meteorologist at Environment Canada, said record lows were set early Monday. In Kentville, N.S., it dropped to almost -2 C, marking a huge shift from the 28 C high on Friday that had set off a growth spurt in a wide variety of crops before the frost hit.Mathew Vankoughnett, a researcher with the applied geomatics research group at Nova Scotia Community College, says such a rapid temperature flip is rare.His research indicates that Greenwood, N.S., in the centre of the Annapolis Valley, only had one similar episode in 1978 when temperatures fell below 0 on June 2.“We expect this type of spell to occur in April and maybe early May, but not June,” he said in an email.Larry Lutz, president of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association, has an apple farm south of Berwick in the Annapolis Valley. He said his Rockland farm and others at higher elevation suffered little to no damage as a result of the freeze, but added it was a different story for farms at lower elevations.“On the valley floor it hit between -3 C and -5 C, which at that point you would see in excess of 90 per cent damage,” he said. “So the growers on the valley floor suffered significant damage.”Lutz said cherry, plumb and pear growers are experiencing the same problems.He said he examined one pear farm Wednesday, finding it likely lost all but 10 to 20 per cent of the crop.McConnell, who is also the vice-chairman of the Winery Association of Nova Scotia, said many of the province’s roughly 15 vineyards were also affected, with harm varying from complete devastation to minimal damage.He said it will be several weeks before he can estimate the extent of the damage to the crops, in part because it remains to be seen how secondary and tertiary buds will fare.In P.E.I., Matt Hughes with the Island’s federation of agriculture in Charlottetown, said damage is being tallied up.“I lost the remainder of my asparagus crop. The frost ended my asparagus crop pretty abruptly. I started a few weeks ago and got some harvest off,” he said in an interview from his farm at Kellys Cross, 30 kilometres east of Charlottetown.“We had two major frosts here and it’s ruined three of my four cutting dates. I would have had four harvests before this frost.”Hughes said farmers grow used to some of the challenges associated with weather fluctuations, but this spring has been especially tough.“I grew up on a farm and we always get up and down years, but this seems to be an extreme year.”— With files from Alison Auld and Keith Doucette.last_img read more

SP declares candidate on Ghaziabad Lok Sabha seat

first_imgGhaziabad: The Samajwadi Party (SP) on Friday declared the name of its candidate on Ghaziabad Lok Sabha seat. Party officials informed that the name announced is one among the 16 candidates declared by the Samajwadi party on various Lok Sabha seats in Uttar Pradesh. As per reports, the list released by the Samajwadi Party, which is contesting the Lok Sabha polls in alliance with the Bahujan Samaj Party of Mayawati, named Senior leader Surendra Kumar alias Munni Sharma as their candidate from Ghaziabad. Also Read – Gurdwara Bangla Sahib bans single use plasticSharma, a native of Muradnagar area is Samajwadi Party’s district president from Ghaziabad. The residents of Ghaziabad had been demanding for a local candidate to be elected as member of parliament from the district. With Sharma’s name in the list, the other competent political parties might get a tuff competition. Meanwhile, the Bhartiya Janta Party and Congress party are yet to declare their candidate from Ghaziabad. The SP-BSP alliance had kept the Ghaziabad Lok Sabha seat for Samajwadi Party.last_img read more

Congress complains to EC against Modi Irani

first_imgNew Delhi: The Congress on Friday moved the Election Commission against Prime Minister Narendra Modi and BJP President Amit Shah for allegedly “dragging” the armed forces in politics repeatedly. Congress leaders Abhishek Manu Singhvi and Randeep Singh Surjewala also raised the issues of Union Minister Smriti Irani submitting “contradictory affidavits” to the Election Commission on her educational qualifications and also about a web series on Modi. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Talking to the media after meeting the EC, Singhvi said PM, the President of the ruling party and its other leaders are “shamelessly dragging the armed forces for cheap politics.” “Never in the history has this happened,” he said, adding the web series on Modi is also a violation of the Model Code of Conduct as it is biographical in nature and it should be banned immediately. “If the person makes another violation, he/she should be barred from two days of campaigning, similarly three and four days for the third and fourth violation,” he said. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Speaking about Irani’s qualification, Surjewala said the Congress is not commenting on her qualification, saying they believe that even the illiterate can also hold high positions. “But the question is the people have been cheated and the Minister has lied to them about her qualifications.” The Congress has submitted a memorandum to the EC over Irani “repeatedly lying” about her qualifications. “There is no information about the degree of the PM and also his favourite minister Irani. There are no classmates of the PM and Irani who are coming out. This is a very serious issue as the people have been cheated repeatedly.” Surjewala demanded that the EC should disqualify Irani for changing her qualifications multiple times. He also said that there should be a strict action and Union Minister Maneka Gandhi should be sacked for her remarks and for “dividing people”. Addressing an election rally, she had said that she would like to win without support of Muslims and would not want to give jobs to them if they did not vote for her. The party also urged the Election Commission to issue directions to all Chief Electoral Officers, booth level officers and other election officials to ensure proper functioning of EVMs during the Lok Sabha elections. It also sought immediate investigation into the malfunctioning of the EVMs and other issues reported from various parts of the country during the first phase of polls on April 11. It said posters of Gen VK Singh were posted right outside a polling station. The party also alleged that BJP candidate from Tehri Garhwal parliamentary constituency “printed voter slips on her election pamphlet”. The party said it was making fifth request for “urgent and necessary” intervention against Modi’s “continued and brazen violation” of the Model Code of Conduct and in particular the “hateful and divisive comments by him”, Shah and UP Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath in election rallies at Nanded, Nagpur and Meerut. In its representation against Irani, Congress called for immediate action for filing “false affidavit”, saying it attracts “up to six months imprisonment and/or fine”.last_img read more

Electronic tongue can taste spicy foods more accurately than humans

first_imgWashington: Scientists have developed an electronic tongue that can ‘taste’ spicy foods more accurately than humans. Spicy food wears out taste buds quickly. This can be a problem for people who make and sell spicy food. “At low concentrations, or low spiciness, it’s hard to discriminate between two samples,” said Courtney Schlossareck, a graduate student at Washington State University in the US. “It’s also hard to tell a difference between two samples at high concentrations,” said Schlossareck. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportThe e-tongue’s ability to differentiate between the spiciness of foods could come in handy for industry, according to a study published in the Journal of Food Science. A problem with testing spicy foods is that people can only test a few samples before their taste buds give out. After a few bites, taste buds can not distinguish differences in taste at all. However, the e-tongue can handle as much heat as any scientist can throw at it and maintain accuracy. “This would allow testers to narrow a selection down to two or three samples for a human tasting panel if they start from 20 different formulations,” Schlossareck said. “That would take days to do with people tasting them,” she said. That is because real people need to wait at least five minutes between samples. Even then, only a few samples can be tested because the spiciness lingers and can throw off results, she said.last_img read more

Bernd Leno has joined Arsenal in €192 million deal

first_imgBayer Leverkusen has sold goalkeeper Bernd Leno to Arsenal for around €19 million, completing Unai Emery’s second major signing as manager.The 26-year-old German international Leno has arrived on a contract that should keep him at the Emirates until 2023, making him the long-term replacement for current number one Petr Cech, reports Four-Four-Two. Emery was delighted after unveiling his latest acquisition, saying: “We are very pleased that Bernd Leno will be joining us,”“Bernd is a goalkeeper of high quality and experience. We are all excited that Bernd has chosen Arsenal and look forward to start working with him in pre-season.” Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.Welcome to Arsenal, @Bernd_Leno – we’re delighted to have you here ?#HeyLeno pic.twitter.com/m4yT22I58V— Arsenal FC (@Arsenal) June 19, 2018Leno was a major part of the Leverkusen squad that achieved a 5th place finish in the Bundesliga last year and he has won 6 caps for his country to date – though unfortunately, he did not make Joachim Lowes final squad for the World Cup.After the purchase of Stephan Lichtsteiner last month, Emery has managed to further enhance his options defensively with the signing of Leno, as his new look Arsenal side begins to take shape.last_img read more

Four Dominicans murdered Community calls for arrests and convictions

first_imgHis advice is not an uncommon cry and for the Dominican Community which is said to have at least 4,000 registered in country, Hernandez said this is a huge loss for them, but not just for them but for the Turks and Caicos.  He added, “The TCI is a high class tourist destination, but if things continue going in the current direction, we will lose everything…”  The Assistant Consul for the Dominican Community, Edwin Hernandez called the surge in killings, scary.  “if the relevant authorities don’t put a handle on this type of crimes, it will come to a point where it will be totally out of hand and will be impossible to control crime.”  Juan Carlos Morla was shot reportedly at point blank range in an armed robbery shortly after 3:30pm on Friday October 7, 2016 in an area officially known as Times Square… steps away from two very popular family eateries and steps away from the Public Library.   Morla worked in construction in the TCI. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Hernandez pleaded with authorities, and said as a citizen he believes it is high time the authorities respond also with better, stronger cases that they can win in the courts.  I quote him again, “..please give the general public an answer, but not just saying who they believe did it, but bringing those guilty before the courts with sufficient evidence to secure a conviction.” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, October 13, 2016 – Four Dominicans are dead this year at the hands of cold-hearted criminals and that community is saddened by losses.   Two women, whose suspect is behind bars awaiting a sufficiency hearing set for next month so that the double homicide trial can begin and two men; both gunned down in separate instances of armed robberies.  Police confirm that the 27 year old killed in down town Providenciales last week was Juan Carlos Morla.  Related Items:27 year old Dominican male gunned down in broad daylight, danny depaula killed in tci, fourth dominican killed this year in provolast_img read more

Father Joes homeless services during winter months

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Deacon Jim Vargas stopped by Good Morning San Diego to discuss how Father Joe’s Villages supports the community throughout the winter and the services it provides.For more information click here. December 21, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Father Joe’s homeless services during winter months KUSI Newsroom Posted: December 21, 2018last_img read more

Alaskan Appointed To Top Position At Interior Department

first_imgThe leased lands are not only close to the pipeline, but allow companies to tap into two new prospects, the Nanushuk and Torok formations. Alaska Bureau of Land Management associate state director Ted Murphy pointed out that it is important to note that the further west you travel in the NPR-A the less infrastructure there is to support development. All of the leases sold adjoin current leases. Balash, who served as served as chief of staff to Senator Dan Sullivan and Natural Resources Commissioner under Governor Sean Parnell, had previously fought for an Alaska-led plan to allow modern seismic studies in ANWR. T ConocoPhillips and Anadarko, jointly bid on a total of about 80,000 acres, building upon the new Willow oil discovery made within NPR-A, and announced a year ago. During Balash’s tenure, the state filed a claim requesting the transfer of 20,000 acres in ANWR from the federal government to the state of Alaska. The BLM rejected the claim, and now Balash could have the power to overturn such a decision. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The U.S. Senate confirmed Alaskan Joe Balash to a top position at the Interior Department on Thursday, serving as assistant secretary for land and minerals management under Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. While only seven of the 900 leases offered in the NPR-A were sold, causing strong discussion on the value of opening less accessible ANWR, it’s important to recognize that the short window between the announcement that the properties would be available and the actual lease offered minimal opportunity for planning and resource allocation for the bidders. During Balash’s Senate confirmation hearing, he pledged to work on speeding permits and allowing responsible drilling and mining, and improve recreational access to federal lands. Story as aired:http://www.radiokenai.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Dorene-on-Alaskan-appointed-to-top-position-at-interior-department.mp3last_img read more

Alejandro Escovedo On New York Lou Reed David Bowie More

first_img Email On the brink of his May residency in NYC’s East Village, Escovedo talks songwriting, future plans, and how “Velvet Underground stole my whole consciousness”Nate HertweckGRAMMYs May 2, 2018 – 6:09 pm Tonight in New York’s East Village, acclaimed songwriter Alejandro Escovedo begins his May residency with the first of five shows in the neighborhood. The gritty, vibrant streets exploding with character and nuance suit his music perfectly. I tracked him down during rehearsal at the Bowery Electric, just a few doors down from where CBGB once stood, to ask him about his New York heroes, the making of his latest masterpiece Burn Something Beautiful, and what surprises he’s got in store for his May residency.”I lived right around the corner,” says Escovedo, reflecting on the East Village vibe. “I used to watch the Cramps cross the street every day to go to breakfast, which was at two in the afternoon, and they were amazing, it was just like this movie that opened up in front of you that was incredible. I just have so many memories here, and every time I come back I gravitate to the Lower East Side.”On this particular return to NYC, Escovedo has mapped out an ambitious month-long residency exploring a variety of formats and incorporating a fascinating list of guests such as singer/songwriter and musical historian Richard Barone, Nuggets collection compiler and Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye, and New York Dolls guitarist Sylvain Sylvain. The residency kicks off with a show at Coney Island Baby on May 2 and closes with a special all-star band at Bowery Electric on May 30.”Back in Austin at the Continental Club, I would do residencies. I would always do something different, whether it was acoustic or feedback with strings,” says Escovedo. “The idea came to do one here when Jesse [Malin] and I were playing a lot of gigs together … I love the intimacy of these places, and I thought this would be a great place to do something like that. … I thought, ‘Well, let’s make every week a little different.'””We’re going to pick the songs together,” says Barone, who works and performs with Escovedo often. “We’ll be using our own songs with songs by artists we admire to tell our stories. It’s a biographical show … I’m going to do one of Alejandro’s songs that I always loved because I think it talks about both of us … it really tells our story.” Alejandro Escovedo and Richard BaronePhoto: Nancy Rankin Escovedo”Richard and I have always had that connection,” Escovedo says, talking about his mutual admiration for Barone, his long history with each special guest and teasing the residency’s finale with a knowing smile. His ambition harkens back to how the city of New York originally grabbed his heart.”When I was a kid in high school and that first Velvet Underground album came out, in our little town, Huntington Beach, California, you could go to any party amongst our group of friends and that record was playing, and we’d listen to it from the very beginning to the very end,” says Escovedo. “Growing up, my friends all wanted to travel to Europe … [but] I wanted to go to New York because the Velvet Underground was from New York.”Lou Reed’s influence on Escovedo’s work is clear, yet never feels imitative. As Barone puts it, “There’s a Lou Reed song for every emotion.” He and Escovedo produced a remarkable tribute to Reed during SXSW 2014 following his death.”There’s something about the way Lou Reed wrote about New York and what I was feeling at the time that made me want to experience that more than I wanted to experience the hippie thing that was happening in California,” says Escovedo. “That’s not to say I didn’t have interest in Buffalo Springfield and Love and all those bands. I did, but the Velvet Underground totally stole my whole consciousness.”Escovedo finally made it to New York in 1978 with his band the Nuns after they opened for the Sex Pistols’ historic last show at Winterland in San Francisco. His arrival in New York was, well, epic.”We had the consummate New York experience. We lived in the Chelsea hotel,” he says. “One of the first nights we were here I sat at a table with Deborah Harry, all of Blondie, the Nuns, Andy Warhol, [photographer] Francesco Scavullo, and George Clinton. We watched the Heartbreakers play at Max’s Kansas City. And that was kind of the beginning. Our first gig was at CBGBs — there’s David Byrne, there’s David Johansen. Everybody was there.”This punk-rock sentiment manifests itself in Escovedo’s songs even today — however, in a way that feels fresh as opposed to nostalgic. Case in point, his song “Johnny Volume” has a foot firmly planted in East Village legacy, but the other kicks forward with lyrics like, “I’m going down to Max’s, Fender Twin on 10/ I’m going back to St. Mark’s Place, start all over again.””I wrote it in Portland,” says Escovedo. “It was actually Scott’s initial song idea, and then we completed it. It’s about Johnny Thunders coming back and wanting to get it right this time — not that he got it wrong, but he wanted another shot at it. ‘I’m feeling so better/ It’s time to make amends,’ and ‘if you see me on the corner, I’m waiting on a friend’ was a reference to the Stones video we all saw [that was filmed] in the East Village.””Johnny Volume” is a live-wired cut from Escovedo’s latest album, 2016’s Burn Something Beautiful, which offers an exhibition in rock songwriting, production and arrangement. The album was produced by former R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck and his Pacific Northwest-based partner in crime, bassist Scott McCaughey.”When I made Burn Something Beautiful,” says Escovedo, “I think I got back to where my heart really was with rock and roll, and I think I needed Scott and Peter to do that, and all the musicians who played on that record. … It was liberating.”Escovedo also talks with reverence and candor about his experience working with legendary producer Tony Visconti on his three albums prior to Burn Something Beautiful. Visconti is best known for his work with the incomparable David Bowie, one of Escovedo’s heroes.”[Bowie] passed away on my birthday,” he says. “David had been a major, major influence on me. Not only did he teach me about music, he taught me about art, and books, and theatre, and cinema, and mime, and Buddhism, and [he] taught us how to dress, [and] also how to be a man in a different way. He suddenly opened a door to a world that made it okay to be flamboyant, to be an actor in a way.”With equal parts imagination from Bowie and storytelling from Reed, Escovedo says his songwriting process is all about honesty and imagery.”This last record that I just finished, which is a concept record, it’s telling a story and so people say, ‘Well, the verses don’t rhyme,’ and then I go back and I listen to Lou — he’s telling a story,” says Escovedo. “The images are more important than whether the meter is correct in a poetic sense or lyrical sense. It’s more about the impact of the words and the story and the images that he creates.”I really don’t worry about the craft as much as I worry about making sure that I’m honest about what I’m trying to say and true to what I’m trying to say and not being pretentious in any way.””What sets [Escovedo] apart is how he continues to grow as an artist without losing track of his core musical identity,” says Barone. “He experiments … but it never loses that ethos of the punk era.”Looking forward, Escovedo says he’s writing a book with San Antonio-based author John Phillip Santos, telling his story in what he calls a “mythical memoir.” But he isn’t done making music yet.”I’m going to make another record with Peter and Scott, then I’m making a record of duets, and then I want to make one final record really encompassing the grandness of strings with distortion, almost like orchestrated metal machine music,” Escovedo says. “Then I think it’s time to put my feet up for a little bit. I travel hard and I’ve battled illnesses and whatnot, so it’s time to enjoy the fresh air.”As he runs through a career-spanning set during rehearsal the day before the first show of his May residency in the East Village, Escovedo couldn’t be more relaxed. He stops a song here and there to point out a string line for the guitar player to cover or to lock in a harmony part with his background vocalists, but you get the sense Escovedo is very comfortable yielding to the energy of rock and roll and putting faith in the musicians around him. He asks the band what song is next, they all casually call him “Al,” and his wife Nancy hangs out close by with their pup, Suki. From California to New York, Austin, Texas, and back again — for all of Escovedo’s travels — rock and roll is his true home.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Facebook Alejandro Escovedo On New York, Lou Reed, David Bowie & More center_img Twitter Alejandro Escovedo’s Rock & Roll Return To NYC alejandro-escovedo-new-york-lou-reed-david-bowie-more News last_img read more

Hard Rock Cafes India franchisee to raise fund expand outlets

first_imgJSM Corp Ltd, which has Hard Rock Café franchisee in India, is planning to raise Rs. 200 crore from private equity investors. The funds raised would be used to expand the number of outlets and bring in more international brands.The company, which also runs popular restaurant chains California Pizza Kitchen and Shiro in India, is considering fund raising by older investors selling their shares. Lodha Capital Markets is acting as the company’s adviser. As part of the company’s expansion plans, JSM would launch popular Chinese food chain Panda Express in India by August 2016, the Mint reported.”About Rs. 150 crore will be raised primarily from new investors, while Rs. 50 crore will be a secondary transaction where the legacy investors will be brought over,” Jay Sing, co-founder and executive director of JSM, was quoted as saying by the publication.JSM Corp was founded by Jay Singh and Sanjay Mahtani in 2004. Some of the other brands of the company are The Big Kahuna, Ginger Tiger, dessert chain Pinkberry, street-food chain Plus91 and Asilo, which is a rooftop bar in Mumbai, according to the company’s website. Singh and Mahtani together hold 55 percent stake in JSM Corp, while the rest is owned by other investors.Azim Premji’s private equity arm, PremjiInvest, acquired 22 percent stake in JSM for about Rs. 150 crore four years ago. The same PE firm may put in additional funds, Singh was quoted as saying by the Mint.A report by consulting firm Grant Thornton India and the Federation of Indian Chambers and Commerce Industry (FICCI) said the Indian food and beverage industry will expand at a pace of 24 percent every year to reach Rs. 3.8 trillion in sales by March 2017.[1 lakh = 100,000 | 1 crore = 10 million | 100 crore = 1 billion]last_img read more

Apan Jewellers owners sued for money laundering

first_img.Customs intelligence on Saturday filed five separate cases against three owners of Apan Jewellers under Money Laundering Prevention Act on charges of being in possession of 15 maunds of gold, and diamonds illegally, reports UNB.Five assistant revenue officers (ARO) of customs intelligence filed the cases with Gulshan police station, Dhanmondi police station, Ramna police station and Uttura police station against Apan Jewellers owners — Dilder Ahmed, Gulzar Ahmed and Azad Ahmed, said Mainul Khan, director general of the Customs Intelligence and Investigation Directorate.The cases were filed following the direction of National Board of Revenue (NBR), Mainul added.Customs intelligence will investigate the cases under section 2 of Money Laundering Prevention Act, 2012 and section 156 (5) of Customs Act, 1969.On 8 June the CIID filed five cases with Dhaka Customs House against the three owners of Apan Jewellers on charges of dodging customs duty on 15.13 maunds of gold seized from its branches.Apan Jewellers is in the limelight after the rape of two private university girls by Shafat, son of Dilder Ahmed, and his cohort in a Banani hotel came to the fore.One of the rape victims filed a case with Banani police station on 6 May accusing five people, including Shafat.last_img read more

Expectant mother among 3 killed in road crash

first_imgRoad Accident logoThree people, including a pregnant woman, were killed in a road crash in Sadar upazila of Rangpur on Thursday.The deceased are Moni Begum, 25, Moni’s aunt Asia Begum, 50, and Tushar, 26, from Dinajpur district, reports UNB.Police said the accident took place around 10:30am when an ambulance carrying the pregnant woman hit a stationary truck as its driver lost control over the steering, leaving the patient and the helper of the ambulance dead on the spot and Asia injured.The tragic incident occurred when Mosaddek Azad along with Moni and Asia were heading to Rangpur Medical College Hospital from Dinajpur.last_img read more

Indigenous icon Morales losing grounds among native people

first_imgPeople sit in front of signs against Bolivian President Evo Morales` bid for re-election in 2019 in La Paz. Photo: ReutersIn 12 years as president of South America’s poorest country, Evo Morales has accomplished many of the goals he set forth when he became the first indigenous person to lead Bolivia.The 58-year-old leftist and former coca farmer has presided over an economy that has grown by an annual average of 4.6 percent since he took office, more than twice the rate for all of Latin America.After nationalizing the country’s bounteous natural gas reserves, he pursued market-friendly economic policies and invested export revenue in social programs that helped lift more than two million people, nearly a fifth of the population, from poverty.With a new constitution in 2009, he even changed the name of the country from the Republic of Bolivia to the Plurinational State of Bolivia, reflecting diverse ethnicities that for centuries had felt like second-class citizens.For Bolivia’s more than 4 million indigenous people, support for Morales appeared to pay off. The poverty rate dropped from 59.9 percent in 2006 to 36.4 percent last year. Access for indigenous communities to electricity, sewerage and water service all grew, according to the World Bank. Here in Charagua, in the country’s remote southern lowlands, Guarani people recently dissolved the local municipality and launched Bolivia’s first experiment in autonomous government. The move, made possible by the new constitution, is meant to replace distant, homogenous rule with policies tailored to the local, indigenous reality. Yet here and across Bolivia, indigenous people are increasingly turning against Evo, as the poncho-wearing Morales is known. The dissatisfaction – over everything from proposed development of indigenous lands to his successful gambit to end term limits – is marring what had been widespread acclaim for a leader emblematic to first peoples’ movements worldwide.   “His way of thinking and his actions aren’t indigenous,” said Gualberto Cusi, a former judge and ethnic Aymara, an influential Andean tribe from which Morales himself also hails. Cusi, who was barred from the Constitutional Court by Congress last year after disagreements with the government, now leads a group of indigenous dissidents. Many Aymara have flourished under Morales’ rule. Building upon a long history selling textiles along Lake Titicaca, they now thrive in commerce, like importing Chinese electronics they sell as far afield as the Amazon rainforest.  But even they are increasingly fed up. “He should go,” said Joaquin Quispe, a cook whose Aymara family moved from Bolivia’s interior to El Alto, a city where a swelling indigenous influx in recent years made it outgrow nearby La Paz, the country’s administrative center.What particularly bothers some are moves by Morales, using supporters in Congress and the judiciary, to consolidate power.Although his own 2009 constitution set a limit of two five-year terms, Morales asked voters in a 2016 referendum to let him run again in 2019.When they said no, Morales convinced the Constitutional Court to let him anyway. The court, consisting of jurists nominated by Congressional allies, ruled that term limits are a violation of his “human rights.” Morales’ spokeswoman, Gisela Lopez, declined to make the president available for an interview and didn’t respond to requests for comment for this story. A close ally, former Senate President Jose “Gringo” Gonzales, said Morales hasn’t abandoned indigenous peoples, but has evolved as president to represent and work with everyone.  “He can sit for one minute with a businessman and the next with a worker,” said Gonzales, who stepped down from the Senate last week for undisclosed reasons. “He still has the humility and simplicity that were highlighted when he took office.”Morales is now the longest consecutively serving head of state in the Americas. He is the sole leader remaining from a wave of leftists, including Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil, who dominated Latin American politics early this century.His name, which graces schools, stadiums, and cultural centers, is increasingly voiced in street protests and scrawled in graffiti. All over the divided country, “Bolivia said no!” sprayings compete with ”Evo Yes!” signs painted by supporters of his party, Movement Toward Socialism, or MAS.Morales won’t go before voters again until late next year. And the opposition remains fragmented, meaning no other leader in Bolivia as yet compares in political stature.Still, in a July poll commissioned by newspaper Pagina Siete, support for the president among likely voters fell to 27 percent from 31 percent last November. A survey by pollster Ipsos this week showed a similar level of support, at 29 percent of likely voters, with a six-point drop over the past year in his approval rating, now at 43 percent.Over the past eight months, Reuters traveled across Bolivia to better understand the waning support for the president among indigenous peoples. From his native Altiplano, the high, arid plateau home to the Aymara, to gas-rich lowlands, where the government has authorized extraction on indigenous lands, many native Bolivians say they no longer feel represented by Morales.“A NEW ERA”For many, the years following Morales’s 2005 election were marked by jubilation and hope.Before his official inauguration in January 2006, Aymara “maestros,” or ritual leaders, held their own ceremony at the pre-Incan site of Tiwanaku, west of La Paz. Morales, in a traditional red tunic, climbed the Akapana pyramid, where shamans presided over a fire ritual and presented him with a staff symbolizing his right to lead the assembled tribes.“Today begins a new era for the native peoples of the world,” Morales said. Tens of thousands of indigenous activists, along with native delegations from as far away as Chile and the United States, cheered.Within months, he began asserting his plans to “decolonize” Bolivia and give locals more voice in government and a greater share of national wealth. On May 1, Labor Day, he ordered troops to occupy natural gas fields and nationalized all hydrocarbons.“The time has come, the longed-for day, a historic day for Bolivia to retake absolute control of our natural resources,” he said in a speech while surrounded by soldiers at an oil field operated by Petroleo Brasileiro, or Petrobras, the Brazilian energy company.Morales began renegotiating energy contracts for a bigger share of the profits, a move that ultimately many companies agreed to. The negotiations earned him plaudits from supporters and boosted government revenues at a time when gas prices were soaring.With the windfalls, Morales enacted measures including school vouchers for kids and pensions for workers who had never held formal employment.For the day-to-day business of governance, Morales appointed women, indigenous peoples and labor leaders to his cabinet. He embraced grass-roots organizations and forged a so-called “Unity Pact,” comprising leaders of Andean, lowland and Amazon tribes. Together, they helped draft the new constitution, approved by 60 percent of Bolivians in a 2009 referendum. That year, in a landslide, Morales won a second term.Tensions with indigenous groups first emerged in 2011.  Enjoying what by then was steadily improving economic growth, Morales proposed a 300-kilometer road through the Isiboro Secure Indigenous Territory, or Tipnis, a Jamaica-sized refuge in the Amazon. The highway, Morales argued, was necessary to bring basic services to remote tribes.But native groups and environmentalists were enraged.The road, they argued, more likely would facilitate drug trafficking, illegal logging and other unwanted activity. Protesters marched for more than a month, during which police and demonstrators clashed in clouds of tear gas and flurries of rubber bullets. “When Evo took office we thought indigenous people would never have to march again,” said Adolfo Chavez, a native Tacana and former president of The Confederation of Indigenous People of Bolivia, or Cidob, a grouping of 34 lowland tribes.The marching succeeded, at least for a time. That September, Morales halted work on the road for further study. But relations with some native groups were damaged.Two major indigenous rights organizations, Cidob and The National Council of Ayllus and Markas of Qullasuyu, left the Unity Pact. Since then, the split has widened into divisions that fall along political lines, not rivalries among Bolivia’s three dozen ethnicities.Soon, government supporters began to pressure both groups, using MAS loyalists to stage what some members described as coups within the organizations. Politics and loyalty to Morales began to matter more than the indigenous cause, they said.  Cidob leader Chavez was voted out in 2012. Chavez, who left Bolivia and now lives in Peru, says he was a victim of political persecution for leading the Tipnis demonstrations. Pedro Vare, Cidob’s current leader, in local media has continued to back Morales and criticize the protesters. Reuters was unable to reach Vare for an interview.One rainy evening in December 2013, MAS activists broke down the door of the two-story La Paz headquarters of Conamaq, as the other indigenous rights group is known. Once inside, they forced members, some of whom were visiting La Paz from remote regions and living there during their stay, to leave.“We had nowhere to go,” recalls Cristobal Salles, an Aymara and Quechua speaker who was a Conamaq councilman and now farms potatoes.  Dissent at both groups vanished.Hilarion Mamani, a 41-year-old  Quechua who led the Conamaq takeover, told Reuters a purge had been necessary. Using a charge long wielded against opponents by some leftists in Latin America, Mamani said previous leaders were acting on behalf of “North American imperialists.” Now, he added, “there are no divisions.”That’s because most of the previous members went on to form  dissident indigenous groups. Those groups have campaigned to enforce presidential term limits and against renewed efforts to build the Tipnis road and other projects on native lands.  In 2014, Morales began his sustained effort to stay in power.Despite the constitutional limit of two terms, Morales argued that his first administration shouldn’t be counted because he had been elected under a previous constitution. In the Constitutional Court, by then composed mostly of judges nominated by allies of Morales in Congress, he found a sympathetic audience.Except for one justice – Cusi, the fellow Aymara who at that time sat on the court. Cusi sought a strict interpretation of the charter and argued against another term. But the other judges prevailed. Morales ran for re-election and, with 60 percent of the vote, won a third term starting in January 2015. Before long, relations with native groups grew worse still.  In February 2015, a government comptroller discovered a $10 million shortfall in a state fund for indigenous projects, finding records of initiatives that had been funded, but never carried out.  Two of Morales’ former rural development ministers were convicted of misusing public funds and served brief jail terms.Some onetime Morales supporters were outraged. “It seems corruption has been institutionalized,” Edwin Prada, a lawyer and former advisor to Conamaq, said in an interview.Morales in public comments has said the fund was poorly run. Reuters couldn’t reach either of the two former ministers for comment.That year, natural gas prices fell from a peak in 2014. The country’s economy, while still healthier than that of many neighbors, cooled.Criticism of Morales and his party grew.   “LORD KING EVO MORALES”In  March 2015, residents of El Alto, formerly a bastion of Morales support, handed MAS its first big electoral defeat. They voted out the city’s MAS mayor, who had polarized local voters because of municipal spending, and elected Soledad Chapeton, an Aymara from a center-right party who became the city’s first female mayor.Morales, meanwhile, kept working to prolong his own mandate – first through the failed referendum and then through another plea to the Constitutional Court. By last year, the court was firmly allied with Morales.After opposing other government initiatives, Cusi, the Aymara judge, was impeached by the Senate. The day before the May 2017 ruling, Cusi donned chains in front of government headquarters and scoffed at what he considered his foregone ouster. “Lord King Evo Morales,” he said before television cameras, “order your puppet senators to condemn me.”  Officially, Cusi was accused of failing to fulfill duties. But many government critics called his removal political.“They found a pretext to oust me,” Cusi told Reuters. Now the head of a Conamaq breakaway group, Cusi recently announced he would seek the office of attorney general.With the go-ahead to pursue a fourth term, Morales stoked even more ire.Early last year, students at the Public University of El Alto, a bastion of political activism, began demonstrating for more educational funding. The ruling on term limits sparked further discontent, fueling demonstrations that continued into this year.In a clash with police, one student died. Police said the student, Jonathan Quispe, was killed when students hurled marbles. University officials said he was shot by police. Reuters couldn’t independently determine what led to Quispe’s death.Last August, Congress approved a project to restart the Tipnis highway. Other construction projects are also drawing fire.At a cost to taxpayers of $7 million, Morales last year inaugurated a three-wing museum with large modern windows in Orinoca, the remote Altiplano town where he grew up herding llamas. The “Museum of the Democratic and Cultural Revolution” tells Bolivia’s recent history through Morales’ own achievements.This month, Morales presided over the opening of a new 28-floor presidential palace in La Paz. He calls the $34 million building “the big house of the people.”The projects, some critics say, are further proof Morales lost touch. “He always said he would consult the people,” said Salles, the former Conamaq leader. “Now he doesn’t.”In Charagua, the lowland Guarani region, residents are struggling with autonomy. One recent afternoon, locals at a school auditorium hashed through problems now plaguing their experiment, the first of three autonomous regions approved by voters recently.Charagua, roughly the size of Panama, in the 1930s was the site of successful resistance against Paraguayan invaders who sought to seize area gas reserves. Despite having gas, however, Charagua remains poor, accessible only by dirt roads. The regional budget, financed in part by La Paz, remains the roughly $4.5 million it was before autonomy. But locals say the national government has all but abandoned them otherwise.“We are worse than before,” said one resident who identified himself as Victor before storming out of the auditorium. “I want a recall on this autonomy.”Reuters was unable to reach the Morales cabinet official in charge of indigenous autonomy.Guarani leaders there said they, too, are unhappy. Ramiro Lucas, a 44-year-old leader of a southern portion of Charagua, lamented that the region recently had to halt school breakfasts because money was needed for health centers. “Now we have land, but what good is that if we don’t have resources?” he told Reuters.last_img

With ORourke Gaining Momentum Cruzs November Alarm Hits New Volume

first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneU.S. Sen. Ted Cruz meets with Austin-area home schoolers on August 4, 2018.As Ted Cruz took questions at a Republican women’s event here Saturday evening, Bastrop retiree Ronnie Ann Burt wanted to know: Should she really trust the growing barrage of chatter online that the senator’s re-election bid is in peril?Cruz’s response: Believe it.“It’s clear we have a real and contested race where the margin is far too close for comfort,” said Cruz, who’s facing a vigorous, massively funded challenge from U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso.Cruz’s stop in this small Central Texas town was part of a return to the campaign trail Saturday in which the incumbent cranked up his long-building warnings that Democratic enthusiasm in the era of President Donald Trump should not be discounted, even in a state as red as Texas.The timing couldn’t have been more fitting: A trio of polls came out this week showing Cruz’s race tightening and a national political forecaster shifted the contest in O’Rourke’s favor. Meanwhile, Cruz launched his first TV ads Friday, including three targeting O’Rourke, and the challenger moved quickly to turn them into a fundraising boon for him.Appearing Saturday afternoon at the conservative Resurgent Gathering in Austin, Cruz delivered a nearly 10-minute assessment of the uncertain political landscape he faces in November.“The biggest challenge I have in this race … is complacency,” Cruz said. “People say all the time, ‘Oh, come on, it’s a Texas re-elect. How could you possibly lose?’ Well, in an ordinary cycle, that might be true. But this is not an ordinary cycle. The far left is filled with anger and rage and we underestimate that anger at our peril.”Cruz added that there is reason to be skeptical of the polls — his campaign has criticized their methodologies — but the trendline “ought to be a cause for concern for everyone.”After the Resurgent conference, Cruz headed to a meeting with supporters and home school families in east Austin, where he continued to press the argument that the GOP base cannot take November for granted. Cruz said Travis County was the “base of the support” for O’Rourke but other “bright red” counties like Denton, Tarrant and Collin need to turn out hard as a counterweight.“There are a lot of good, strong conservatives [in Travis County] too — you’re outnumbered, but it does make you sturdier when you’re withstanding criticism and abuse,” Cruz said. “What [Democrats] are doing is to find every liberal in the state of Texas and get them energized and get them to show up.”Cruz’s remarks at events Saturday came a day after Gov. Greg Abbott offered a more reassuring forecast for November while addressing the Resurgentconference. He dismissed the idea of a “blue wave” in November as media hype that “sells papers” and reminded the audience that he ended up defeating his much-ballyhooed Democratic opponent, Wendy Davis, by over 20 points in 2014.“Texas is going to stay red,” said Abbott, whose Democratic opponent, Lupe Valdez, has not caught traction in the way O’Rourke has against Cruz.Cruz did not sound as sure as Abbott on Saturday — and his supporters appeared to get the message.“I think what Sen. Cruz said is true: The Democrats are unhappy that they lost [the 2016 presidential election] because they never anticipated it, and so they’re coming out in force, and I see it in my own county,” said Jeanne Raley, vice president of the Lost Pines Republican Women group that hosted Cruz in Smithville. “That just means we have to work harder.”“Complacency will kill any of us,” she added.O’Rourke spent Saturday in the border city of Del Rio, the latest stop on his 34-day tour of the state during the August congressional recess. Holding an evening town hall there, O’Rourke geared up supporters for a final three months of the race with momentum on their side.“They say there are two points that separate us, the campaign we’re running and Ted Cruz — two points is all we’re down right now,” O’Rourke said. “There are 94 days to go in this election. We can totally win this, but it is 100 percent on us.”O’Rourke’s campaign continued to show momentum Saturday afternoon, when it said it had raised more than $500,000 over the last 24 hours in response to Cruz’s commercials. The campaign has set a goal of topping $1 million by the end of the weekend.Cruz got a taste of the opposition several minutes into his appearance at the Resurgent Gathering, when a protester interrupted with a sign reading, “Russian Bootlicker,” called Cruz a coward and used an expletive to denounce the crowd before breaking out in chants of “Beto!” Speaking afterward, Cruz wasted little time turning the incident into a rallying point for the fall.“That anger, by the way, is dangerous,” Cruz said. “Every one of us needs to be taking this November election deadly serious.”Sydney Greene contributed to this report. Sharelast_img read more

The Paradox of Black Health

first_imgThere’s a new gray area in health research. For decades, scholars have looked at disparities through the lens of black and white. Changing demographics and growing immigrant populations are demanding new approaches that explore diversity within racial groups.“The Black population is not monolithic,” says Helena Dagadu, a fellow at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College who is preparing to complete her PhD in the Department of Sociology at Vanderbilt University. Dagadu is among the Center’s first cohort of doctoral fellows set to graduate in May 2015.A native of Ghana who came to the United States as a child, Dagadu is particularly interested in how health inequities affect black immigrant populations. “African immigrants represent one of the fastest-growing immigrant populations in the U.S.,” she says. Her research examines health disparities between the native-born American Black population and Black African immigrants—specifically as they relate to chronic, non-communicable conditions such as stroke, heart disease and diabetes.“The tide is turning in health research,” she says. “It’s moving toward an understanding that there are differences in black populations.”Dagadu’s observations align with a recent upsurge of interest in how underrepresented populations self-identify. According to the Pew Research Center, the 2010 census revealed that many communities, including Hispanics, Arabs, and people of mixed race, have said they’re unsure of which box to check on census forms.“The 2020 census will ask the race/ethnicity question differently,” says Dagadu. “They’re recognizing diversity within groups, which has implications for survey data coming out of the census. And we researchers get a lot of our data from those survey responses.”Like Dagadu, Courtney Thomas, PhD, another Meharry scholar, investigates the ways in which race and ethnicity influence health within black population groups.“The center of my research has been understanding health paradoxes,” says Thomas, who successfully defended her dissertation in sociology earlier this year. She will be joining the University of Kentucky faculty as an Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American and Africana Studies.“For example, we see that college-educated black women are at higher risk than lower-educated white women when it comes to maternal outcomes. I want to see how race and ethnicity figure into those outcomes.”Another area of interest for Thomas is the effects of race-based stressors and racial identity on mental wellbeing. “Even subtle forms of racial discrimination have a significant impact on mental health,” she explains. “The idea of not belonging—being unsure about how you’re viewed by others—causes stress and anxiety.”The negative effects are markedly greater for women than for men, Thomas adds. Subtler forms of racial discrimination have a greater impact on women, while more overt acts have a greater effect on men.Exploring how differences in social class and gender affect physical health and mental wellbeing is crucial, Thomas says. “It gives us a more nuanced understanding of black Americans’ health issues.”Both Thomas and Dagadu applaud the fellowship at Meharry for providing scholars with invaluable hands-on mentorship and leadership development. Another 11 fellows are currently pursuing doctoral studies.The Center, launched in 2009, has worked to increase the diversity of health policy leaders in the social, behavioral, and health sciences—particularly sociology, economics, and political science—who will one day influence health policy at the national level.“The RWJF fellowship has been a great complement to my PhD training,” says Dagadu. “We’ve had opportunities to hear the perspectives of prominent scholars interested in building a healthier America. I’ve gained practical professional development skills, and learned how to talk about my work to the media as well as influential policymakers working to eliminate health disparities.”She credits the experience with helping her land a position as an Endowed Assistant Professor of Sociology at Loyola University–Chicago. “I believe this program helped make my interview a success,” she says.“You can go to any research program and learn,” explains Thomas. “This fellowship has given me regular exposure to top scholars. Right from the beginning, I felt like I was in the middle of the field and I had a place at the table.”last_img read more

The 6th Annual Unsung Heroes Award Dinner

first_imgThe Sisters Saving the City are honoring African American Volunteers on June 28 at the Delta Community Center, 2501 Springhill Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21215 at 4 p.m. Sisters Saving the City recognizes its responsibility to lift up our Black males who care about their community. Not only do these role models care but they are willing to do the work through their volunteerism to help black youth.Contact Kathryn Cooper Nicholas 410-601-0380 for more information.last_img