Clarke favourite to be captain

first_img Clarke, Miguel Angel Jimenez and Thomas Bjorn are the contenders to succeed Paul McGinley at Hazeltine in September next year, when Europe will be looking to maintain their recent dominance with a seventh win in the last eight contests. McGinley is part of the five-man selection panel who will each have a vote when they meet at European Tour headquarters in Wentworth, with predecessors Jose Maria Olazabal and Colin Montgomerie joined by European Tour chief executive George O’Grady and players representative David Howell. Former Open champion Darren Clarke remains a strong favourite to be named European Ryder Cup captain for 2016 on Wednesday. Press Association Sources close to Clarke are understood to be quietly optimistic that the Northern Irishman has enough support to get the nod, although the 46-year-old is understandably said to be not taking anything for granted. Clarke was forced to deny a newspaper report in October 2012 that he had been offered the captaincy for 2014, a role which eventually went to McGinley as the relationship between the former friends became significantly strained. Clarke had sent McGinley a letter in 2011 supporting the latter’s bid to become captain in 2014, but later changed his mind and also put himself forward for the role. And when Tom Watson was named US captain in December 2012, Clarke suggested 2010 captain Montgomerie should also be considered as ”whoever it is standing on that stage opposite Tom Watson needs a huge presence”. With the public backing of players such as Rory McIlroy, Luke Donald and Ian Poulter, McGinley subsequently won the day, but admitted last year that his conversations with Clarke were now ”short and sweet” and amounted to little more than passing pleasantries. Graeme McDowell has urged Clarke and McGinley to put their differences aside for the sake of the European cause and immediately after his highly-praised role in the five-point win at Gleneagles, McGinley insisted his relationship with Clarke would not cause any issues in the s election process. ” ‘Absolutely no problem whatsoever,” McGinley said. “I’m going to be very professional in my input. I’m going to get opinions from a lot of players and a lot of people before I put my opinion forward as to what it will be. Just like I was very much pushed over the line by the players, I want to get the opinion of the players. ”I think we’re very fortunate in Europe, a little bit like the Liverpool soccer team and the boot room, I think a lot of us have benefited hugely from being vice-captains. Darren has been a vice-captain along with many other guys. We will see where that all evolves and I’ll make a professional decision based on the views of people that I respect.” As with McGinley before him, Clarke has had the support of high-profile players such as McIlroy, McDowell and Lee Westwood and noticeably maintained a high media profile at Gleneagles. The 2011 Open champion is competing in the Dimension Data pro-am in South Africa this week – along with eldest son Tyrone – but has struggled with his game in recent seasons. In contrast, Jimenez is still competing on the European Tour at the age of 51 while winning titles on the Seniors Tour, while Bjorn qualified to play at Gleneagles and finished on the winning team for a third time in three appearances. Whoever is chosen on Wednesday can expect their opposite number to be 2012 captain Davis Love, who will be given a chance at redemption after being on the wrong end of the ‘Miracle at Medinah’ according to reports in the United States. Love, whose side led 10-6 going into the singles in Chicago only to lose by a single point, was part of the 11-man task force created to examine all aspects of the United States Ryder Cup process after the defeat at Gleneagles, but was thought to be behind 2008 captain Paul Azinger and Fred Couples in the pecking order. last_img read more

REVIEW: ‘Tigertail’ is a touching portrayal of the immigrant experience

first_imgAlthough the film is simple in its execution, Yang beautifully contrasts this visual style when the film shifts to the present to convey how separated Pin-Jui is from his family and friends. Everything around him is muted, from the beige walls in his house to the gray polos he wears. The lifelessness around him is a product of how distant he is as a person.  In Yang’s feature film debut, subtlety runs supreme. The quietly devastating flashback sequences and performances make “Tigertail” a touching tribute about the highs and the lows of the immigrant experience. As a child running around lush rice fields in Taiwan, Pin-Jui (Zhi-Hao Yang) is taught by his grandmother that “crying never solves anything.” All it shows is weakness, which isn’t a luxury his family can afford when they’re struggling to survive. Brief as the interaction may be, it establishes who Pin-Jui grows up to be: a detached man who never allows himself to be vulnerable.  (Photo courtesy of Netflix) This scene, as well as many others, showcases Yang’s restraint in making the film, forgoing overdramatized scenes for quiet, simple sequences between characters. Although the decision to move is a painful one to make, for an immigrant like Pin-Jui, it’s a necessary choice that must be made for the chance at a better life. The semi-autobiographical tale of writer-director Alan Yang’s father, “Tigertail” is an intimate, restrained portrayal of the immigrant experience — how one’s decision to leave their native home is often preceded with hope but followed with regret over what was left behind.  Pin-Jui sees the physical strain that the factory job is taking on his mother and ultimately decides to leave Taiwan and move to the United States. The only way he could possibly move, however, is by agreeing to marry his boss’s daughter Zhenzhen (Kunjue Li), leaving his true love behind without any notice.  Though the characters live a life of poverty and work at a factory with poor labor conditions, the film portrays life in Taiwan as vibrant and colorful. Shots overlayed with grain, similar to the 35mm effect, make the recounts of the past feel like a memory, a recollection of a difficult upbringing. Yet, in hindsight, it was a time in his life that produced the most joyful moments. The film cuts back and forth between Pin-Jui’s past and the present where, as a rebellious young man (Hong-Chi Lee) in Taiwan, he dreams of life in the United States. Decades later, as a retiree in New York, Pin-Jui (Tzi Ma) struggles to connect with his daughter Angela (Christine Ko), resulting in the two often sitting in silence. All he wants is to move to the United States, not only to provide for his mother Minghua (Yang Kuei-Mei) but to be with his childhood sweetheart Yuan (Yo-Hsing Fang), the only person who makes him feel less lonely in this world.  Pin-Jui’s departure is not just him leaving his mother or his romantic partner, it’s him leaving Taiwan — the only home he’s ever known. Instead of a cathartic moment where mother and son emotionally embrace, unsure if they’ll ever see one another again, they simply stare at each other and go their separate ways.  The relationship between Pin-Jui and his wife, or the lack thereof, mirrors the relationship he has with his daughter later on in life. Both are hindered by his inability to express emotion. Angela wishes her father would express his care for her, but all he does is stare at her in confusion. Zhenzhen wishes her husband would put as much effort into their marriage as he does into his work. For Pin-Jui and Zhenzhen, the American dream turns out to not be what they expected. Instead, it’s a dirty studio apartment and not knowing anyone except for one another. They only have each other for support, but even then, they don’t truly know each other.  The two don’t have anything in common; nothing connects them as husband and wife. When Pin-Jui buys a piano with the intention of learning together, there’s a fleeting hope that they’ll finally connect in something. The realities of work and paying bills squander their chance at bonding; the piano is symbolically disregarded, piled under a stack of newspapers.  Yang’s understanding of this predicament is only bolstered through the silence that runs through the film, creating instances of tenderness. The more time passes and the more silence fills the room, Yang successfully brings feelings of woe to the cinematic space. Despite this, never does the film stray toward excessive pessimism. There’s a fine balance: The audience witnesses a bittersweet feeling of love and hope that never materializes.  Yang’s loose interpretation of his father’s life and relationships with his wife and daughter neither attempts to praise nor condemn him. “Tigertail” simply depicts a man who’s been taught to block out any emotion he may have, to put his head down and continue to work. Tragically, the result of his resilience is a community of loved ones who hardly know him. last_img read more

Strong singles play sends Syracuse to win over Pittsburgh

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Luke Jensen wasn’t satisfied with his players’ efforts. During the break between doubles and singles play, Jensen huddled his players around him and demonstratively instructed them to focus on their matches.“The mind is the biggest thing,” the Syracuse head coach said after the match. “When you’re going into competition, it can be your greatest enemy or your greatest strength.”The Orange took Jensen’s words to heart.Syracuse used a strong effort from its top singles players to dominate its match against Pittsburgh (3-3, 1-1 Big East) on Sunday morning at Drumlins. The win was the fourth straight for Syracuse (4-5, 1-1), and the first of the year in conference play.The top three singles players propelled the Orange, making quick work of their opponents to ensure the 6-1 victory. Sophomore Amanda Rodgers led the way for Syracuse at the No. 1 singles spot for the second time this season, taking a 7-5, 6-2 win over Pittsburgh’s Taylor Washington.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think I just needed to weather the storm a little bit,” Rodgers said. “I played her last year, and I knew I was in for a fight today.”Like Rodgers, both Maddie Kobelt and Jimena Wu didn’t spend much time on the court before getting the win. All three top singles players were the first on the court to finish their matches.“It’s a really good sign that we have a really tough top three or top four,” Jensen said. “We can battle, and we’ve got to be able to battle.”Syracuse earned its fourth straight doubles point on Sunday, taking two of the three matches to jump out to the early lead.Kobelt and Wu each dropped four games en route to their respective victories. Brittany Lashway also stepped up in her second match since recovering from injury. She went on to win 6-3, 6-4.Lashway’s return allowed junior Aleah Marrow to get a breather. She suffered a mild sprain in her foot in the match against Binghamton on Friday.With Syracuse’s win Sunday, the Orange now has four straight wins at home. Syracuse entered the stretch with a record of 0-5.“We’re really big about how this is our house,” Rodgers said. “We don’t lose here.”The win over Pittsburgh comes on the heels of Friday’s victory over Binghamton. Syracuse dominated the Bearcats, not dropping a single set. Both Kobelt and Lashway cruised to 6-0, 6-0 finals.Overall, in the four matches at home this year, Syracuse has lost only three head-to-head matchups.“Drumlins has always been amazing to us. Our crowd has always been amazing to us,” Jensen said. “Look at what we do in other sports. It’s tough to play us here in Syracuse. It’s tough to get up here. It’s tough to live around here. It wears on [our opponents], and I think our athletes feed on that.” Comments Published on February 18, 2013 at 1:24 am Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more