Paper Makers Make More Cuts

first_img“This was an attractive opportunity, and we intend to use the proceeds received at closing to pay down debt,” IP’s chairman and CEO John Faraci said in a statement. The down economy and reduced demand have taken a toll on paper makers. One producer, Sappi Fine Paper North America, announced that it will indefinitely suspend operations at its facility in Muskegon, Michigan, resulting in the furlough of approximately 190 salaried and hourly employees. The suspension is set to begin April 1.The company said the suspension was necessary in light of “significantly lower global demand for coated fine paper products.” As part of a separate cost-cutting initiative, Sappi also said it is eliminating an additional 70 positions company-wide.UPM is suspending production at a pair of its mills in Finland in April. The suspension is said to result in a 880,000-ton per-year reduction of coated and uncoated specialty paper as well as uncoated mechanical magazine paper.Meanwhile, Memphis, Tennessee-based International Paper said it is divesting the equivalent of 143,000 acres of properties located in southwestern U.S. The company is selling 114,000 acres to the American Timberlands Fund for $220 million in cash and donated the remaining acres (worth approximately $55 million) in exchange for a 20 percent investment in the fund.last_img read more

Building a Custom Video Program

first_imgStack Media relied on a regional freelance network to reach a few hundred thousand viewers per month when it started its integrated video campaigns in 2008.Within two years, a Stack Studios crew had been assembled and was traveling the country filming for sponsors like Gatorade and Nike. They’re now getting upwards of 15 million views per video and generating 60 percent of the company’s revenue.Stack Magazine, the flagship of the larger media group, was established in 2005 as a training and fitness title centered on professional athletes. Video came in 2008 with the launch of the company’s digital network—a “natural extension” of the content they were already producing, according to Nick Palazzo, the company’s co-founder and CEO.Is It For Your Audience?The demographics worked for Stack. The majority of its audience is comprised of 16 to 24-year-old males—among the most active online video viewers, according to several recent reports. Overall, 18 to 24-year-old men and women with regular access to the Internet spend close to 11 hours watching web videos per month, or nearly one-third of their total time online, says Nielsen’s Cross Platform report from the second quarter of this year. A Pew Research survey from this fall indicates that the group is highly engaged, as well, with nearly a quarter of all adult American males sharing videos.All told, comScore has tallied more than 100 million Americans watching video online each day, up 43 percent from 2010.How Do You Make It?Pricing for the content is highly variable, Palazzo says, with the number of shoots being the key determinant. A single session—requiring travel, equipment, venue, lighting, etc. (along with the personnel to manage it all)—can run up to $10,000. On the low end, a shoot can be arranged for around $1,500. It’s up to the advertiser.The same goes for concept. The project is usually handed off to Stack right from the start, but sponsors can play a larger role.“Sometimes they can be very involved in storyboarding, bringing the concept to life and providing assets,” Palazzo says. In Stack’s case, those “assets” are usually famous athletes, but they can be products, venues, signage, memorabilia, logos, uniforms or anything else they want included.The bigger the asset, the bigger the response. Timing plays a role, but the golden-rule for luring readers to the newsstand applies to attracting viewers online: recognition.“What really drives traffic and engagement is getting the biggest star possible,” Palazzo says.How Do You Sell It?Palazzo estimates that as much as 85 percent of Stack’s content is now video-based, so naturally it’s their lead story to tell potential advertisers. From there it’s a matter of selling the complete distribution and media package.“It’s hard to sell just straight video. You have to package it with other media assets that you already have—that’s really the most important thing,” he says. “In a lot of what we do, you’ll get the video content, the distribution across our platforms, and media—banner and print—all together in one package. It’s much more efficient to buy everything rather than just piecing it out. We make it an offer they can’t refuse.”Integrated Sales Still Difficult To Do With AgenciesIn a divided print and digital world, Stack can run into difficulties trying to manage a deal across the multiple ad agencies running those respective arms. Whenever possible, Palazzo will try to deal directly with the company.“It’s sometimes hard to do integrated ad sales if they have separate agencies for digital and print,” Palazzo says. “One of the most important things to focus on is working directly with the client. They’re going to be the ones that have the ability to do multiplatform deals, as well as the foresight and knowledge base to help make a video program successful.”How Do You Measure It?Stack’s integrated video campaigns don’t feature any product links or buy options—they’re straight branding enterprises—so measuring success can be a challenge. In the absence of conversions, Palazzo relies on engagement metrics like video plays and average time spent with the video to let him know how they performed.“If you get someone to watch a minute or minute-and-a-half of video, that’s a pretty valuable impression,” he says. “If you can get them to click-through, then great, that’s something you can quantify. But that’s not the key metric that we focus on.”last_img read more

Alejandro Escovedo On New York Lou Reed David Bowie More

first_img Email On the brink of his May residency in NYC’s East Village, Escovedo talks songwriting, future plans, and how “Velvet Underground stole my whole consciousness”Nate HertweckGRAMMYs May 2, 2018 – 6:09 pm Tonight in New York’s East Village, acclaimed songwriter Alejandro Escovedo begins his May residency with the first of five shows in the neighborhood. The gritty, vibrant streets exploding with character and nuance suit his music perfectly. I tracked him down during rehearsal at the Bowery Electric, just a few doors down from where CBGB once stood, to ask him about his New York heroes, the making of his latest masterpiece Burn Something Beautiful, and what surprises he’s got in store for his May residency.”I lived right around the corner,” says Escovedo, reflecting on the East Village vibe. “I used to watch the Cramps cross the street every day to go to breakfast, which was at two in the afternoon, and they were amazing, it was just like this movie that opened up in front of you that was incredible. I just have so many memories here, and every time I come back I gravitate to the Lower East Side.”On this particular return to NYC, Escovedo has mapped out an ambitious month-long residency exploring a variety of formats and incorporating a fascinating list of guests such as singer/songwriter and musical historian Richard Barone, Nuggets collection compiler and Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye, and New York Dolls guitarist Sylvain Sylvain. The residency kicks off with a show at Coney Island Baby on May 2 and closes with a special all-star band at Bowery Electric on May 30.”Back in Austin at the Continental Club, I would do residencies. I would always do something different, whether it was acoustic or feedback with strings,” says Escovedo. “The idea came to do one here when Jesse [Malin] and I were playing a lot of gigs together … I love the intimacy of these places, and I thought this would be a great place to do something like that. … I thought, ‘Well, let’s make every week a little different.'””We’re going to pick the songs together,” says Barone, who works and performs with Escovedo often. “We’ll be using our own songs with songs by artists we admire to tell our stories. It’s a biographical show … I’m going to do one of Alejandro’s songs that I always loved because I think it talks about both of us … it really tells our story.” Alejandro Escovedo and Richard BaronePhoto: Nancy Rankin Escovedo”Richard and I have always had that connection,” Escovedo says, talking about his mutual admiration for Barone, his long history with each special guest and teasing the residency’s finale with a knowing smile. His ambition harkens back to how the city of New York originally grabbed his heart.”When I was a kid in high school and that first Velvet Underground album came out, in our little town, Huntington Beach, California, you could go to any party amongst our group of friends and that record was playing, and we’d listen to it from the very beginning to the very end,” says Escovedo. “Growing up, my friends all wanted to travel to Europe … [but] I wanted to go to New York because the Velvet Underground was from New York.”Lou Reed’s influence on Escovedo’s work is clear, yet never feels imitative. As Barone puts it, “There’s a Lou Reed song for every emotion.” He and Escovedo produced a remarkable tribute to Reed during SXSW 2014 following his death.”There’s something about the way Lou Reed wrote about New York and what I was feeling at the time that made me want to experience that more than I wanted to experience the hippie thing that was happening in California,” says Escovedo. “That’s not to say I didn’t have interest in Buffalo Springfield and Love and all those bands. I did, but the Velvet Underground totally stole my whole consciousness.”Escovedo finally made it to New York in 1978 with his band the Nuns after they opened for the Sex Pistols’ historic last show at Winterland in San Francisco. His arrival in New York was, well, epic.”We had the consummate New York experience. We lived in the Chelsea hotel,” he says. “One of the first nights we were here I sat at a table with Deborah Harry, all of Blondie, the Nuns, Andy Warhol, [photographer] Francesco Scavullo, and George Clinton. We watched the Heartbreakers play at Max’s Kansas City. And that was kind of the beginning. Our first gig was at CBGBs — there’s David Byrne, there’s David Johansen. Everybody was there.”This punk-rock sentiment manifests itself in Escovedo’s songs even today — however, in a way that feels fresh as opposed to nostalgic. Case in point, his song “Johnny Volume” has a foot firmly planted in East Village legacy, but the other kicks forward with lyrics like, “I’m going down to Max’s, Fender Twin on 10/ I’m going back to St. Mark’s Place, start all over again.””I wrote it in Portland,” says Escovedo. “It was actually Scott’s initial song idea, and then we completed it. It’s about Johnny Thunders coming back and wanting to get it right this time — not that he got it wrong, but he wanted another shot at it. ‘I’m feeling so better/ It’s time to make amends,’ and ‘if you see me on the corner, I’m waiting on a friend’ was a reference to the Stones video we all saw [that was filmed] in the East Village.””Johnny Volume” is a live-wired cut from Escovedo’s latest album, 2016’s Burn Something Beautiful, which offers an exhibition in rock songwriting, production and arrangement. The album was produced by former R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck and his Pacific Northwest-based partner in crime, bassist Scott McCaughey.”When I made Burn Something Beautiful,” says Escovedo, “I think I got back to where my heart really was with rock and roll, and I think I needed Scott and Peter to do that, and all the musicians who played on that record. … It was liberating.”Escovedo also talks with reverence and candor about his experience working with legendary producer Tony Visconti on his three albums prior to Burn Something Beautiful. Visconti is best known for his work with the incomparable David Bowie, one of Escovedo’s heroes.”[Bowie] passed away on my birthday,” he says. “David had been a major, major influence on me. Not only did he teach me about music, he taught me about art, and books, and theatre, and cinema, and mime, and Buddhism, and [he] taught us how to dress, [and] also how to be a man in a different way. He suddenly opened a door to a world that made it okay to be flamboyant, to be an actor in a way.”With equal parts imagination from Bowie and storytelling from Reed, Escovedo says his songwriting process is all about honesty and imagery.”This last record that I just finished, which is a concept record, it’s telling a story and so people say, ‘Well, the verses don’t rhyme,’ and then I go back and I listen to Lou — he’s telling a story,” says Escovedo. “The images are more important than whether the meter is correct in a poetic sense or lyrical sense. It’s more about the impact of the words and the story and the images that he creates.”I really don’t worry about the craft as much as I worry about making sure that I’m honest about what I’m trying to say and true to what I’m trying to say and not being pretentious in any way.””What sets [Escovedo] apart is how he continues to grow as an artist without losing track of his core musical identity,” says Barone. “He experiments … but it never loses that ethos of the punk era.”Looking forward, Escovedo says he’s writing a book with San Antonio-based author John Phillip Santos, telling his story in what he calls a “mythical memoir.” But he isn’t done making music yet.”I’m going to make another record with Peter and Scott, then I’m making a record of duets, and then I want to make one final record really encompassing the grandness of strings with distortion, almost like orchestrated metal machine music,” Escovedo says. “Then I think it’s time to put my feet up for a little bit. I travel hard and I’ve battled illnesses and whatnot, so it’s time to enjoy the fresh air.”As he runs through a career-spanning set during rehearsal the day before the first show of his May residency in the East Village, Escovedo couldn’t be more relaxed. He stops a song here and there to point out a string line for the guitar player to cover or to lock in a harmony part with his background vocalists, but you get the sense Escovedo is very comfortable yielding to the energy of rock and roll and putting faith in the musicians around him. He asks the band what song is next, they all casually call him “Al,” and his wife Nancy hangs out close by with their pup, Suki. From California to New York, Austin, Texas, and back again — for all of Escovedo’s travels — rock and roll is his true home.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Facebook Alejandro Escovedo On New York, Lou Reed, David Bowie & More center_img Twitter Alejandro Escovedo’s Rock & Roll Return To NYC alejandro-escovedo-new-york-lou-reed-david-bowie-more News last_img read more

The Red Cross gives the 2020 Land Rover Defender the ol whatfor

first_imgEnlarge ImageShots of cars in sand dunes never get old. Land Rover We’re slowly approaching the point where Land Rover will finally pull back the veil on its hotly anticipated 2020 Defender SUV. However, today isn’t that day, which means we’ll have to live with more cool pictures of a camouflaged Defender for now. Shucks.Land Rover on Friday released a new smattering of pictures showing the 2020 Defender tackling the sand dunes in Dubai. Part of the Defender’s testing program ahead of its official unveiling, Land Rover teamed up with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to give this little ute the ol’ what-for in an area where its buyers are likely to travel.Out in Dubai, the Defender didn’t just whip around the dunes. It also tackled hairpin curves on the Jebel Jais highway. Temperatures shot past the triple-digit mark, which makes it a great place to suss out the Defender’s high-temp behavior, as well. It also tackled altitudes well above the one-mile mark, ensuring its engine doesn’t choke itself out when the air gets thin. Share your voice Land Rover Tags 2018 Range Rover Velar: Effortless SUV elegance on- and off-road Land Rover Post a comment 33 Photos SUVs Luxury cars Future Cars 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque review: Style, now with more substance Land Rover first announced the return of the Defender in late 2018, and it revealed that the model would finally return to the US, as well, following a 23-year absence. Its boxy good looks have remained hidden by camouflage, but Land Rover hasn’t been shy about throwing out a whole lot of teasers ahead of its anticipated debut, which could come as early as the Frankfurt Motor Show in September. Even rumors have been few and far between. The most notable one we’ve heard about, though, is that the Defender will be available in three sizes — 90, 110 and 130, with the smallest being a three-door model. We’ve also seen what appears to be the Defender’s interior thanks to some clever spy shots. If you can’t afford one, don’t worry, because Lego has a Technic Defender coming out, which should be significantly easier on the wallet. 2020 Land Rover Defender hits the dunes of Dubai More From Roadshow 0 2019 Land Rover Range Rover P400e review: A hard hybrid to recommendlast_img read more

Cesar Herada designs oil sucking drones to help clean the seas after

first_img As it turns out someone with some serious skills also wanted that. Cesar Herada, a researcher who has formerly been associated with Ushahidi and MIT’s Senseable City Lab, has created the Protei oil-spill cleaning drone. The Protei oil-spill cleaning drone is designed to be a semi-autonomously device that can sail into the sea and scoop up the oil in a spill, leaving the oil in the container and the water in the ocean. How is this accomplished? With the help of powerful oil-sucking booms that are built into the device. The oil-sucking boom is detachable, and each one is able to hold up to two tons of crude oil per trip. The advantage to using one of these devices is that no humans have to be exposed to toxic substances in order to clean up the mess. © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Oil spills represent a significant danger to the oceans of the world. Many of us watched the DeepWater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico and wished that there was a simple way to clean it up. Citation: Cesar Herada designs oil sucking drones to help clean the seas after a spill (2011, April 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-cesar-herada-oil-drones-seas.html Explore further More information: sites.google.com/a/opensailing.net/protei/ The Protei drones are also able to be modified for other types of disasters. In the future modified versions of the Protei drones may possibly be sent in to detect the levels of radiation in water supplies, or to collect samples of other potentially polluted waters. The designers have also mentioned that there may be some commercial uses for the Protei drones as well, but they did not give any specifics on this point. Clean-up tools may help protect wetlands from Gulf of Mexico oil spill The best part is that Protei is an Open Source Hardware project. This means that its design will be available to the public, so it can be built by anyone. The remote controlled Protei is relatively inexpensive to produce and inflatable. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more