Harrison says he will answer critics

first_imgAudley Harrison insists he will answer his critics by seeing off Ali Adams and putting himself back in the frame for a major title.Wembley’s former Olympic champion faces the Iraq-born Adams, who lives in Chelsea, at the Brentwood Centre in Essex on May 26.It will be the 40-year-old Harrison’s first bout since he was beaten by David Haye in a one-sided world heavyweight title fight in November 2010.Harrison said: “I know it’s dangerous to look past an opponent, especially when they’re hungry and motivated like Ali Adams. But let’s be honest, I’m in a different league.“After I give Ali Adams a lesson in the sweet science, I’m looking for a challenge with one of the upcoming heavyweights. I’m throwing my name into the hat with David Price, Tyson Fury, Jonathan Banks or Seth Mitchell.”The much-maligned Harrison says he will retire if he loses to Adams, who has pledged to end his career.A victory could set up a clash with the likes of Price, who fights Sam Sexton for the British title this weekend.“I found a way to create some goodwill with my appearance on Strictly Come Dancing and I made my body heal,” Harrison added.“I’m ready to put in not one, but a succession of Olympic-type performances to finish my career on a high and go out as a British bad-boy-done-good, who turned his life around and did himself, his family and his country proud.“Through my trials and tribulations, people will come to understand the power of never ever giving up and rising up each time life knocks you down.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Gallery: Operation Hydrate bringing water to dry lands

first_imgLearners from the Houghton Muslim Academy helped Operation Hydrate at a recent water drive at the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The initiative collected more than R55-million on the day. (Image: Sandile Khumalo)Operation Hydrate, the NGO that has been donating water in drought stricken areas of South Africa, has distributed more than 6 million litres of water so far. The group aims to collect R95-million worth of water by Nelson Mandela Day this year.Though the initiative only started on 4 January this year, it has already garnered massive support from ordinary people, as well as the likes of Mango Airlines, the national cricket team, and the National Lottery.Contact Yaseen Theba on 082 494 2824 to find out how you can contribute to Operation Hydrate’s water drive. For information about helping or where to drop off water or send donations, visit the Operation Hydrate Facebook page, or follow @HydrateSA on Twitter, #OperationHydrate.Below are some of the highlights from the initiative’s work so far. Pictures are from Operation Hydrate’s Facebook page unless stated otherwise. Operation Hydrate has distributed more than 6 million litres of water in drought stricken areas, to date. Water has been delivered by 41 trucks and tankers to Swartruggens, Senekal, Steynsrus, Qwa Qwa, Zululand, Nongoma, Ulundi, Paulpietersburg, Vryheid, and Aliwal North so far. According to the NGO, some people in the drought stricken areas have resorted to drinking sewage water. Leslie Sedibe, the chief executive of Proudly South African, said: “Just to give somebody a glass of water… could be the greatest testimony you’ll ever give them.” Operation Hydrate aims to collect R95-million worth of water by 18 July this year. Pictured here are learners from Benoni Muslim School who donated water to the cause. Water Affairs Minister Nomvula Mokonyane announced that the National Lottery would donate R50-million to the cause. On hearing this news, Operation Hydrate raised its target from R67-million to R95-million. (Image: Sandile Khumalo) The Proteas, the South African cricket team, donated five to 10 litres of water each. These were handed over in large bottles to Operation Hydrate. Cricket South Africa also called on supporters before the game against England in Centurion to donate bottled water at the stadium, collecting more than 5 000 litres of water.Chairperson of Operation Hydrate Fayaaz Moosa, pictured, said that although there had been some rain in certain parts of the country, the water was not necessarily potable, or of drinking quality. (Images: Sandile Khumalo) The donations were “ubuntu in action”, the initiative’s co-ordinator, Yusuf Abramjee, said at a water drive at the Nelson Mandela Foundation. “Real people are the ones donating,” he said. “We as civil society will continue to provide this basic human right.” (Image: Sandile Khumalo)last_img read more

One Take Greg Wells On Adele Canada HipHop Music Memoirs

first_img One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch: One Take With Greg Wells one-take-greg-wells-adele-canada-hip-hop-music-memoirs Email One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch One Take With Marian Hill One Take With Demo Taped Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch One Take With Halestorm In this episode, Wells tells us which is his go-to instrument for writing a song, his favorite hip-hop album of all time and his favorite Canadian artist. He also reveals the one word he would use to describe Adele and Keith Urban as well as what he thinks is the best produced album of all time.  Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton Watch: One Take With MØ Watch One Take With Superfruit One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto Watch: One Take With Dorothy Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Amber Rubarth One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch: One Take With Dorothy One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With The Mrs Watch One Take With Marian Hill One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch: One Take With MØ Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch: One Take With Lights One Take With Le Butcherettes Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton News Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take: Greg Wells On Adele, Canada, Hip-Hop & Music Memoirs One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Jul 26, 2018 – 5:17 pm One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Khalid Prev Next One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch: One Take With Lights One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch One Take With Nick Cannoncenter_img One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch: One Take With Lights Watch: One Take With Dorothy Facebook One Take One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Logic One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch One Take With Julia Michaels Twitter Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch: One Take With Khalid One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton One Take With Le Butcherettes One Take With The Mrs Watch One Take With Logic One Take With Demo Taped One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Le Butcherettes Watch One Take With Little Big Town Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal Watch One Take With Superfruit Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With The Mrs The GRAMMY-winning producer reveals what he thinks of Adele, his favorite Canadian artist, the best musical memoir he’s read, and moreJennifer VelezGRAMMYs Jul 26, 2018 – 5:15 pm GRAMMY-winner Greg Wells wears many hats as a producer, musician, mix engineer and songwriter. He has worked with GRAMMY winners like Adele and Pharrell Williams and on The Greatest Showman movie. Recently, he sat down to play a round of One Take, GRAMMY.com’s rapid-fire question game that challenges your favorite artists to see how many questions about life, music and everything in between they can answer in just 60 seconds. Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Demo Taped Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch: One Take With MØ Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch One Take With Julia Michaels Watch One Take With Logic Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch: One Take With Khalid Watch One Take With Julia Michaels One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch One Take With Marian Hill Watch One Take With Superfruit Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”last_img read more

Apan Jewellers owners sued for money laundering

first_img.Customs intelligence on Saturday filed five separate cases against three owners of Apan Jewellers under Money Laundering Prevention Act on charges of being in possession of 15 maunds of gold, and diamonds illegally, reports UNB.Five assistant revenue officers (ARO) of customs intelligence filed the cases with Gulshan police station, Dhanmondi police station, Ramna police station and Uttura police station against Apan Jewellers owners — Dilder Ahmed, Gulzar Ahmed and Azad Ahmed, said Mainul Khan, director general of the Customs Intelligence and Investigation Directorate.The cases were filed following the direction of National Board of Revenue (NBR), Mainul added.Customs intelligence will investigate the cases under section 2 of Money Laundering Prevention Act, 2012 and section 156 (5) of Customs Act, 1969.On 8 June the CIID filed five cases with Dhaka Customs House against the three owners of Apan Jewellers on charges of dodging customs duty on 15.13 maunds of gold seized from its branches.Apan Jewellers is in the limelight after the rape of two private university girls by Shafat, son of Dilder Ahmed, and his cohort in a Banani hotel came to the fore.One of the rape victims filed a case with Banani police station on 6 May accusing five people, including Shafat.last_img read more

No city of joy for refugees

first_imgTo realise his aspiration of becoming a pure “Kalkatta-wallah”, the protagonist of this tale of a fervent, pervading desire for belonging and acceptance is advised to follow four key rules – believe that you know everything, accept rumours are more important than facts, make a grand gesture every now and then and most importantly, have a low enough ambition to be envious of those with higher ones. But can he follow them without irrevocably losing his identity and moorings and will he survive the transition? Also Read – World War I’s forgotten violent aftermath and toxic legacyThis is the premise of acclaimed story-teller Kunal Basu’s latest work – a searing, visceral narrative of the life and aspirations of the under-privileged outsiders in a metropolis and how their success is only a thin line away from disgrace or worse!Jamshed Alam or Jami, who with his parents and polio-affected sister exchanged one limbo – a refugee camp for Bihari Muslims in Dhaka optimistically called “Geneva” – for one marginally better, a chaotically, colourful Kolkata tenement thanks to an uncle who is a ruling Communist Party leader in the city and his zari factory-running mother, has one fixed dream – becoming a pukka Kalkatta-wallah. Also Read – Enid Blyton’s adventures get even more mouth-wateringWith his childhood entanglement with a local gang leading to an unceremonious early exit from school, he becomes an assistant to a passport agent, who is also engaged in some dodgy work. A chance encounter with a lonely, high-society woman during the understaffed Durga Puja holidays at the travel agency where he is working seems to open the door to a world of luxury and privilege and more so after she introduces him to a friend who runs a massage saloon with “other benefits” and he takes to this work with gusto.  A world of the rich and famous – and the kinkily dangerous – is now accessible but also heightened is the danger from jealous rivals, police, and most from the world he grew up in.After he meets again and befriends a former co-worker – a single mother with a sick boy, Jami’s various worlds – family, neighbourhood and the gang, massage and other ‘services’ clients, and the world of culture he sought to become part of and succeeded to some extent though at a personal cost – collide after the old familiar things change in 2011, the cat-and-mouse games of terror and security rear their head, and he is at the marked risk of losing all that is dear to him and has painstakingly worked for, and even his very existence. Playing key roles in his chaotic journey are a multitude of well-drawn characters – his ulcer-suffering father, his hard-working but determined mother, his clear-thinking but sarcastic sister Miriam, Uncle Mushtak, the Communist party fixer (who is later dethroned), Jahanara, the local temptress, Rakib, the near psychotic gang-leader, Rajesh Sharma, the travel agent whose apprentice he becomes, Ani Mitra, his first Bengali friend and fount of wisdom for the city, Mrs Goswami who changes his life, Rani, the hijra who manages the massage parlour, and Mandira and Pablo, who not only make an empathetic human but also ultimately endanger him.Basu’s narrative is not a very comforting – in fact, is most unsettling – account of aspirations of migrants to become an anonymous part of a big metropolis where they land up in the hope of sustenance and once managing to climb out of the flotsam and eke out a basic livelihood, not matter how deprived and how filled with small and big acts of treachery towards loved ones and others, to dream to achieve some part of the opulently plush lifestyle they see around them and help to facilitate for the better-off.A key plot is also the basic absurdity of subcontinent’s affairs – farcial had it not been tragic – that runs through the principal protagonist’s origins. His family fled their ancestral home to a nearby part of a new country where they could be safe and prosper, but soon found themselves unwanted and under a new threat when this itself became a new country, and were forced to seek refuge again in the very country they originally fled from – and in a city which is anything but a City of Joy for them.It is a picture of Kolkata at its most unsympathetic and unwelcoming – and from a viewpoint most should thank for being spared – but still necessary viewing. Don’t shirk it! IANSlast_img read more