Father Joes homeless services during winter months

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Deacon Jim Vargas stopped by Good Morning San Diego to discuss how Father Joe’s Villages supports the community throughout the winter and the services it provides.For more information click here. December 21, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Father Joe’s homeless services during winter months KUSI Newsroom Posted: December 21, 2018last_img read more

Paper Makers Make More Cuts

first_img“This was an attractive opportunity, and we intend to use the proceeds received at closing to pay down debt,” IP’s chairman and CEO John Faraci said in a statement. The down economy and reduced demand have taken a toll on paper makers. One producer, Sappi Fine Paper North America, announced that it will indefinitely suspend operations at its facility in Muskegon, Michigan, resulting in the furlough of approximately 190 salaried and hourly employees. The suspension is set to begin April 1.The company said the suspension was necessary in light of “significantly lower global demand for coated fine paper products.” As part of a separate cost-cutting initiative, Sappi also said it is eliminating an additional 70 positions company-wide.UPM is suspending production at a pair of its mills in Finland in April. The suspension is said to result in a 880,000-ton per-year reduction of coated and uncoated specialty paper as well as uncoated mechanical magazine paper.Meanwhile, Memphis, Tennessee-based International Paper said it is divesting the equivalent of 143,000 acres of properties located in southwestern U.S. The company is selling 114,000 acres to the American Timberlands Fund for $220 million in cash and donated the remaining acres (worth approximately $55 million) in exchange for a 20 percent investment in the fund.last_img read more

Building a Custom Video Program

first_imgStack Media relied on a regional freelance network to reach a few hundred thousand viewers per month when it started its integrated video campaigns in 2008.Within two years, a Stack Studios crew had been assembled and was traveling the country filming for sponsors like Gatorade and Nike. They’re now getting upwards of 15 million views per video and generating 60 percent of the company’s revenue.Stack Magazine, the flagship of the larger media group, was established in 2005 as a training and fitness title centered on professional athletes. Video came in 2008 with the launch of the company’s digital network—a “natural extension” of the content they were already producing, according to Nick Palazzo, the company’s co-founder and CEO.Is It For Your Audience?The demographics worked for Stack. The majority of its audience is comprised of 16 to 24-year-old males—among the most active online video viewers, according to several recent reports. Overall, 18 to 24-year-old men and women with regular access to the Internet spend close to 11 hours watching web videos per month, or nearly one-third of their total time online, says Nielsen’s Cross Platform report from the second quarter of this year. A Pew Research survey from this fall indicates that the group is highly engaged, as well, with nearly a quarter of all adult American males sharing videos.All told, comScore has tallied more than 100 million Americans watching video online each day, up 43 percent from 2010.How Do You Make It?Pricing for the content is highly variable, Palazzo says, with the number of shoots being the key determinant. A single session—requiring travel, equipment, venue, lighting, etc. (along with the personnel to manage it all)—can run up to $10,000. On the low end, a shoot can be arranged for around $1,500. It’s up to the advertiser.The same goes for concept. The project is usually handed off to Stack right from the start, but sponsors can play a larger role.“Sometimes they can be very involved in storyboarding, bringing the concept to life and providing assets,” Palazzo says. In Stack’s case, those “assets” are usually famous athletes, but they can be products, venues, signage, memorabilia, logos, uniforms or anything else they want included.The bigger the asset, the bigger the response. Timing plays a role, but the golden-rule for luring readers to the newsstand applies to attracting viewers online: recognition.“What really drives traffic and engagement is getting the biggest star possible,” Palazzo says.How Do You Sell It?Palazzo estimates that as much as 85 percent of Stack’s content is now video-based, so naturally it’s their lead story to tell potential advertisers. From there it’s a matter of selling the complete distribution and media package.“It’s hard to sell just straight video. You have to package it with other media assets that you already have—that’s really the most important thing,” he says. “In a lot of what we do, you’ll get the video content, the distribution across our platforms, and media—banner and print—all together in one package. It’s much more efficient to buy everything rather than just piecing it out. We make it an offer they can’t refuse.”Integrated Sales Still Difficult To Do With AgenciesIn a divided print and digital world, Stack can run into difficulties trying to manage a deal across the multiple ad agencies running those respective arms. Whenever possible, Palazzo will try to deal directly with the company.“It’s sometimes hard to do integrated ad sales if they have separate agencies for digital and print,” Palazzo says. “One of the most important things to focus on is working directly with the client. They’re going to be the ones that have the ability to do multiplatform deals, as well as the foresight and knowledge base to help make a video program successful.”How Do You Measure It?Stack’s integrated video campaigns don’t feature any product links or buy options—they’re straight branding enterprises—so measuring success can be a challenge. In the absence of conversions, Palazzo relies on engagement metrics like video plays and average time spent with the video to let him know how they performed.“If you get someone to watch a minute or minute-and-a-half of video, that’s a pretty valuable impression,” he says. “If you can get them to click-through, then great, that’s something you can quantify. But that’s not the key metric that we focus on.”last_img read more

iBall Launches QuadCore Cobalt Andi 47G Smartphone with 42 Jelly Bean OS

first_imgOSAndroid Jelly Bean 4.2 GPSGPS and A-GPS Battery2220mAh battery The Cobalt Andi 4.7G will directly compete with Samsung Grand Quattro, Lava Xolo Q700, Wicked Leak Wammy Titan and Micromax Canvas A 116. But even with slightly different features, the phone could be considered a bit overpriced compared to its rivals in the Indian market where there is no dearth of quad-core smartphones. Additional FeaturesDual SIM Dual standby; Gyro, Compass Geo Sensor, Proximity sensor, Light sensor and magnetic sensor; OTG Function; Pop Up Play; Flip To Mute, Intelligent Answer and Shake to Answer, Direct Call, Gesture Unlock Screen, Power Saving mode, Boot Accelaration, iBall Connect and Dual MIC fro noise redution. Connectivity3G HSPA downlink 42 Mbps, uplink 11Mbps; Edge/GPRS GSM: 900/1800/1900MHZ; Wi-FI 802.11 b/g and Bluetooth 4.0 Mumbai-based handset manufacturer iBall expanded its range of Andi smartphones, with the launch of its Cobalt Andi 4.7G running on Android 4.2 Jelly Bean.The new Andi smartphone priced at ₹19,995 and from e-retailer Tradus it is available for ₹17,990 onwards.The new dual-SIM Cobalt Andi 4.7G smartphone comes with a quad-core 1.2 GHZ Cortex A7 processor backed by 1GB RAM. It sports a 4.7-inch IPS HD (720p) display with a pixel density of 312ppi. The other specs include an internal memory of 16GB which could be expanded up to 32GB via microSD card. It also supports generic Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi hotspot along with OTA updates.The new Andi smartphone sports a massive 12-megapixel auto focus rear camera and a 5-megapixel auto-focus front camera. The 2,200mAh battery allows extended battery life.  On the sensor front, it is equipped with G-sensor, Gryo Sensor, Proximity Sensor, Light and Magnetic Sensors.  The USB connector enables it to connect to the keyboard and mouse.Key specs of the new Cobalt Andi 4 7G are:Design and DisplayDesign and Display11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Design and DisplayProcessor11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Quad core 1.2 GHz Cortex A7processorDesign and DisplayCamera11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Enhanced 12MP AF Camera with Dual LED flash5MP AF Front camera for video Calling.Design and DisplayBattery11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)2220mAh batteryDesign and DisplayRAM and Storage11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)1GBRAM; 16GB internal storage and 32GB external MicroSD card supportDesign and DisplayOS11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Android Jelly Bean 4.2Design and DisplayConnectivity11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)3G HSPA downlink 42 Mbps, uplink 11Mbps; Edge/GPRS GSM: 900/1800/1900MHZ; Wi-FI 802.11 b/g and Bluetooth 4.0Design and DisplayGPS11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)GPS and A-GPSDesign and DisplayAdditional Features11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Dual SIM Dual standby; Gyro, Compass Geo Sensor, Proximity sensor, Light sensor and magnetic sensor; OTG Function; Pop Up Play; Flip To Mute, Intelligent Answer and Shake to Answer, Direct Call, Gesture Unlock Screen, Power Saving mode, Boot Accelaration, iBall Connect and Dual MIC fro noise redution.Design and DisplayBundled Accessories11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP)Extra Flip Cover, OTG Cable and Screen Guard.center_img ProcessorQuad core 1.2 GHz Cortex A7processor Design and Display11.94 cm (4.7”) IPS HD (720p) 1280×720 (320ppi) displayErgonomic camber-line surface (Curved TP) Bundled AccessoriesExtra Flip Cover, OTG Cable and Screen Guard. RAM and Storage1GBRAM; 16GB internal storage and 32GB external MicroSD card support CameraEnhanced 12MP AF Camera with Dual LED flash5MP AF Front camera for video Calling.last_img read more

Agri Marketing dept targets 150 Sufal Bangla stalls by March 2019

first_imgKolkata: The state Agriculture Marketing department has set a target of setting up as many as 150 Sufal Bangla stalls by March 2019, after becoming successful in reaching its goal of opening 101 stalls.It may be mentioned that the department had set a target of setting up 101 Sufal Bangla stalls before Durga Puja. Recently, 21 movable and 5 static Sufal Bangla stalls have been inaugurated, which took the total number of such stalls to 101 across the state. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSoon after reaching the target, the state Agriculture Marketing department has carried out an assessment to find out where it is still required to open such stalls. Subsequently, the decision has been taken to introduce another 50 stalls by the end of the 2018-19 financial year.Tapan Dasgupta, the state Agriculture Marketing minister, said: “Our endeavour is to open another 50 stalls by the end of March 2019.”The main idea behind setting up Sufal Bangla stalls is to help common people staying in the urban or semi-urban parts of the state get fresh vegetables at the right price. At the same time, it also encourages setting up of more Farmers Production Organisations (FPOs). Farmers, who are members of the FPOs, directly supply their produce to the Sufal Bangla stalls that get sold at the right price. As a result, farmers no longer need any middlemen to sell their produce. They also get the right price for their produce and do not incur loss. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThere are both static and movable Sufal Bangla stalls. The static ones are situated mainly in urban and semi-urban areas in the state, while the movable ones keep travelling at different points within a particular area to sell fresh vegetables.Officials of the state Agriculture Marketing department has initiated the task of identifying the places where static ones can be set up and where there is requirement of movable ones.It may be mentioned that price of vegetables and other items, which are available in Sufal Bangla stalls, is available in the website of the Agriculture Marketing department. After checking the price, one can also place order over phone for home delivery, which is available in some of the stalls. The department is also taking steps to introduce the home delivery service in all of its stalls.last_img read more

Why Everyone Can Use Randi Zuckerbergs Number One Focus Tip

first_imgApril 13, 2017 Editor’s Note: Entrepreneur’s “20 Questions” series features both established and up-and-coming entrepreneurs and asks them a number of questions about what makes them tick, their everyday success strategies and advice for aspiring founders.In the intense world of Silicon Valley, your stock rise and falls by the state of your startup. And for those founders who don’t make it their number one focus, they are often judged harshly.That is something Randi Zuckerberg learned first hand, first as the head of marketing at Facebook during the social media giant’s early years, and then as the CEO and founder of her own marketing firm, Zuckerberg Media.“What is life without being a three dimensional person? It’s so boring,” she says of the people who believe a startup should be the only thing on your plate. “How can you tell someone to put away the things they are passionate about?”In addition to running Zuckerberg Media, she is a speaker, radio host on SiriusXM and the author of bestselling business and children’s books — Dot Complicated and Missy President.She is also a lifelong student of technology and explores how it has impacted our lives through her 5-year-old online community, which is also called Dot Complicated. And in 2014, she achieved her childhood dream of making her Broadway debut.We caught up with Zuckerberg and asked her 20 Questions to see what makes her tick.1. How do you start your day?I start my day with a little bit of a cheesy mantra that I’ve been using for about 10 years. It says, “work, sleep, fitness, family, friends — pick three.” There is a lot of pressure, especially on women, to do everything well, every single day. I like to give myself permission to do three things really well each day, and it can be a different three tomorrow, as long as it all balances out in the long run.2. How do you end your day?In my ideal mind, I want to do something relaxing, like meditation or yoga. In reality, I’m in bed on social media, on my laptop and on my phone all at the same time. That’s an area of my life that I’m actively trying to work towards. I know that sleep and relaxation is so important, but I would consider myself a work in progress when it comes to the end of the day habits.3. What’s a book that changed your mind and why?Me, Myself and Us by Dr. Brian Little. I struggled for a long time because I’m really an introvert, but I have to act extrovertedly, because I’m giving speeches or meeting with entrepreneurs. I felt very alone in the world and then Dr. Little came out with this book about being pseudo extrovert, and it was all about introverts that have to pretend to be extroverts for their business lives.It totally changed my life and opened up a whole world of thinking for me. The book said if you go out there and have to act extraverted, don’t forget you’re an introvert at the core, which means you’re going to need to build in downtime to your schedule, otherwise you’re going to burn out. We don’t run on the same kind of social energy that extroverts do. So I know that if I have a day where I am on camera or giving a talk, I’ll actually build “do not schedule” blocks of time into my calendar. That’s not something I would have done before his book, but it’s something that’s really effective in my business and personal life4. What’s a book you always recommend and why?Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes. It’s an awesome book. She’s an incredible woman and I think that we can all get out of our comfort zone a little more.5. What’s a strategy to keep focused?I like to carve out blocks of time that I’m going to be unplugged, which is sometimes frustrating to the rest of my team. But I find that it’s hard to do creative, thoughtful tasks when you are interrupted by emails and text messages. I like to carve out two to three hours, where I do a deep dive into writing a piece or working on a speech. That is the most effective hours of my entire day.Related: This Founder Shares the Mindset That Helps Her Stay On Track6. When you were a kid what did you want to be when you grew up?For a while, I wanted to be a mermaid, but apparently that was not a tangible goal. I really wanted to sing on Broadway. That was my big goal my entire life. I eventually gave it up to go into something reasonable, like technology and entrepreneurship.7. What did you learn from the worst boss you ever had?I learned about how to treat people, but I also learned that is is better to give people feedback in the moment. Early in my career, I had these bosses that would check in with me every six months — and tell me for last six months that I’ve been doing x, y and z and that’s not good. I’d sit there thinking, “Why didn’t you tell me six months ago, so that I wasn’t just making the same mistakes?” That impacted my own management style, because I always want to give feedback in the moment.8. Who has influenced you most when it comes to how you approach your work?I’m so lucky to have a great mentor in Kathleen Kennedy, who is the president of LucasFilm. She’s given me great advice on what happens when you’re the only woman in the room, and how to find mentorship and peer guidance around you even if you have to look in other industries.We’ve definitely spoken about the fact that sometimes your best mentors are right around you, and you don’t even know. A lot of times we look for someone high above us to be a mentor, but often peer-mentor groups are actually going to be the most effective and helpful.9. What’s a trip that changed you?About a year ago, I traveled to Kuwait. I spoke at one of the first women in business conferences they had in the entire country. It really opened my eyes and challenged my viewpoint. I met some wonderful entrepreneurs that I’m still in touch with on social media. I feel really grateful for that opportunity, and it made me realize that I need to take more trips like that to get out of my own bubble and to expand my view of entrepreneurship in different regions in the world.10. What inspires you?Definitely art, theater, culture. Anytime that I want to feel inspired I go to the theater. I spent so much time in my life building platforms, and it’s easy for techies to forget that platforms are nothing without art to go on them.Related: The Co-Founder of Gilt on What Her First Job at Ebay Taught Her About Running a Company11. What was your first business idea and what did you do with it?A snow-shoveling subscription service when I was in middle school. I grew up in New York, and I was making a little bit of pocket money shoveling our own walkway. I then thought, what if I went door to door and say, here’s my price for today, or you could pre-order for the entire season. If it snows a lot you’ll get a good deal, but it if it doesn’t, that’s the risk you take. I had a few houses our block that took me up on it, mostly because the cute neighborhood kid had an idea, but now I see all the subscription services out there, and I think I was a little ahead of my time.12. What was an early job that taught you something important or useful?My dad is a semi-professional bridge player, and from a very young age, I used to be an assistant at the bridge club. It was fun, except it gets really stressful during certain times of the match when everyone needs to say their scores at the same time and pretty much every person raises their hand and calls for the caddy, and you have to run like a frantic animal collecting scores. Very early on it taught me about time management, how to deal with difficult and impatient people and how to pace myself and enjoy the downtime between the craziness..13. What’s the best advice you ever took?Someone once told me, when we were talking about how easy it is to Google yourself and go on social media and see what they are saying about you, they said to me, “you know what Randi, you’re never as good as they say you are, and you’re never as bad as they say you are. You can’t let it get to your head or your heart.”14. What’s the worst piece of advice you ever got?Someone once told me to be less interesting. I think they meant it in a constructive way, because in Silicon Valley there is a culture that you have to be 24/7 invested in your startup, otherwise you’re not taken seriously. It’s a very “all in” culture, especially if you’re a woman. People already expect you to be distracted by your family, so you need to go even more down that road to show you’re all in.I always loved theater and art, so I got some advice to be less interesting, because they felt like people might think I was distracted if they knew I also had an interest in theater. It took me a few years to realize that was probably the worst piece of advice I had ever been given. 15. What’s a productivity tip you swear by?I swear by Evernote and note-taking apps. I’m constantly writing notes to myself and sharing them with my team and my husband. With email I respond either instantly or never. If I’m sitting there I can respond right away, but if I walk away, I get buried by a hundred more emails that come in. I wouldn’t be able to function without it.Related: This Founder Shares the Secret to How to Make Your Business Last16. Is there an app or tool you use in a surprising way to get things done or stay on track?It’s old school, but I set a lot of alarms during the day, like for when when I want to be done with something. Sometimes I follow them, sometimes I don’t, but it does bring mindfulness into my day.17. What does work-life balance mean to you?To me, it’s a long-term goal. A lot of people put pressure on themselves to make it a short-term, everyday goal. I like to give myself permission to be lopsided on a given day.18. How do you prevent burnout?I have two toddlers, and I’m on the road over 100 days a year for work. It’s really easy to put yourself last. I found that I was always thinking about work and then rushing to be home for my family. So self care was at the bottom of my priority list. If you don’t carve out time for yourself, you’re not going to be good to anyone else in your life.Now I block out those do not schedule chunks. I’m the only one that is going to create those boundaries for myself and my time, not anyone else. I would definitely encourage more entrepreneurs to not feel bad or guilty about doing things like that.19. When you’re faced with a creativity block, what’s your strategy to get innovating?I just try to force myself to sit and write — even if what I write is nonsense, and I end up throwing it out. Creativity and writing is a muscle, and you need to discipline yourself to actually sit and write ideally at the same time every day to get used to it. Before you know it, if you keep going, you’re going to write something. I was able to write my whole business book in less than a month, because I decided that I was going to write four to six hours every day.20. What are you learning now? For me, I even see social media and technology as constant education. The tech is changing so quickly for someone like me. If I didn’t constantly work to keep educating myself, I wouldn’t even be hired as a junior social-media manager today.  I’m constantly in a state learning, researching what’s going on, what the innovations are, what the social media platforms are doing. There is not day that goes by that I don’t try to educate myself in tech. How Success Happens 12 min readcenter_img Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. Listen Nowlast_img read more