Prospects of St. Louis vs Chicago MLS rivalry excites McBride

first_imgMajor League Soccer is headed to St. Louis and Brian McBride is already excited for the prospects of a rivalry between the expansion side and Chicago Fire. The two cities have a long history of sports rivalries, with the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals sharing a division in Major League Baseball, while the Blackhawks and Blues are both members of the National Hockey League’s Central division. That rivalry will now have the chance to extend to the soccer pitch, with St. Louis set to begin play in 2022 after being awarded a team by MLS on Tuesday.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? And McBride, who played his college soccer at St. Louis University and made over 100 appearances for the Fire during his professional career, is thrilled by the prospects. “I’m really excited,” former Fulham and Columbus Crew forward McBride said on ESPN. “And not just because St. Louis deserves it, and the history of St. Louis.  “But now you’ve got this rivalry between Chicago and St. Louis. [It] is there in all professional sports that they both have sports in. And now you have it with the Fire and the St. Louis team that’s coming in. It’s going to be really special.”The new outfit in St. Louis will be the 28th team in MLS, but the club will be the first in one regard – with a majority female ownership group, the first of it’s kind in league history and a rarity in top-level professional sports. And those new owners are hoping to continue the proud legacy of sports achievement in the city as they add a soccer club to the roster of professional teams. “The most interesting aspect, and one we are very proud of, is the fact that we are the first female majority led ownership group in MLS history, and one of few in all professional sports,” St. Louis owner Carolyn Kindle Betz at Tuesday’s announcement. “This is truly a historic day for St. Louis.  “I believe it was just a couple months ago we were celebrating our very first Stanley Cup win. So being awarded this MLS team just continues to add to the positive momentum going on in our city.  “We are providing a great opportunity to bring together many different segments of the community, uniting people and their love for the game. As we have stated from the beginning, we did not want to take resources away from the city. Our goal has always been overwhelmingly to privately finance a team and stadium that fuel the region’s continued growth, bringing people together and creating a lasting legacy for this city.”last_img read more

NSLC Releases Second Quarter Results

first_imgThe Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation (NSLC) today, Dec. 15, recorded earnings of $54.8 million on net sales of $137.9 million for the second quarter of 2005 (July 3 to Oct. 1). That marked an increase of 8.9 per cent compared to the same quarter in 2004. A detailed news release on the second quarter results can be found by following the About NSLC and Corporate News links on the NSLC website at www.thenslc.com . -30-last_img

22 states sue Trump administration over new coal rules

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A coalition of 22 Democratic-led states has sued the Trump administration over its decision to ease restrictions on coal-fired power plants.In June, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency eliminated the its Clean Power Plan and replaced it with a new rule that gives states more leeway in deciding required upgrades for coal-fired power plants.The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, says the new rule violates the federal Clean Air Act because it does not meaningfully replace power plants’ greenhouse gas emissions.The lawsuit was filed by attorneys general in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia.The Associated Press read more

UN conference on natural disasters opens with call for better mitigation measures

Three weeks after a devastating Indian Ocean tsunami killed at least 160,000 people, the United Nations World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR) opened today in Kobe, Japan – site of a disastrous earthquake that claimed 40,000 lives 10 years ago – with a clarion call for better measures to mitigate the effects of natural hazards.“All disaster-prone countries should adopt clear, goal-oriented disaster reduction policies and action plans underpinned by dedicated structures and resources,” UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Jan Egeland told over 4,000 participants from more than 150 countries, urging them to turn commitments into action and increase funding.At the top of the agenda is a tsunami early warning system for the Indian Ocean, which experts say could have saved scores of thousands of lives when gigantic waves from an undersea earthquake battered a dozen countries on 26 December, injuring more than half a million people beyond the death toll and leaving 5 million others in desperate need of basic services and at risk of deadly epidemics.“We must draw and act on every lesson we can, and prevent such tragedies from occurring in the future,” Secretary-General Kofi Annan said in a videotaped message after the conference opened with a minute of silence in memory of those who perished in last month’s disaster.The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has already laid out plans for a warning system, including deep water buoys, tide gauges and a regional tsunami alert centre at a cost of $30 million to be operational for the Indian Ocean by June 2006, expanding worldwide a year later. The system would alert people in coastal regions in a tsunami’s path to evacuate hours before the devastating waves struck.In 1968 UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) launched a successful International Tsunami Warning System for the Pacific, presently the only one in the world.But tsunamis will not be the only disaster high on the agenda of the five-day conference as it draws up a 10-year global action plan to mitigate the worst effects of other catastrophes, too, such as hurricanes and quakes, through early warning systems, quake-proof buildings, accelerated response units and other measures to reduce the toll.“Technology is not a cure-all. From Singapore to South Africa, experience shows us that people, not hardware, must be at the centre of any successful disaster warning and preparedness measure,” Mr. Egeland said, stressing the need for disaster education. “Children everywhere should be learning about living more safely with the natural hazards around them, as a part of their basic life skills education.”He proposed new funding, recommending that countries earmark a minimum of 10 per cent of the billions spent on disaster relief for disaster risk reduction.Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi pledged his Government’s support in enhancing regional cooperation and promoting partnerships to help build a global culture of disaster prevention while Emperor Akihito, referring to Japan’s own long-standing expertise in disaster reduction, outlined the need to cross natural boundaries to assist more vulnerable communities in preparing themselves.The conference presented “a precious opportunity to share mutual experiences, to protect lives and livelihoods of people from natural disasters, by aiming to strengthen preparedness and to create a society where people can live in safety and security,” the emperor said. Various UN agencies will put forward specific mitigating strategies related to their sector during the week.World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director James T. Morris, for example, is slated to address the gathering on measures to augment emergency preparedness for food relief, while the Director of the Office for Outer Space Affairs (OOSA), Sergio Camacho-Lara, will highlight the important role of space-based technologies in managing natural disasters.OOSA is playing a key role in facilitating capacity-building in developing countries to enable them to use space technology during all phases of disaster management – from early warning to disaster reduction, rescue and rehabilitation. read more