Nelson Home Building Centre Leafs Player Profile of the Week — Alec Wilkinson

first_imgTwitter, Facebook, Instagram: InstagramThe Nelson Daily:  What type of player are you?Alec Wilkerson: I’m a playmaker. I just look for my teammates on the ice. I have good vision and I’m more of a passer than a scorer, for sure.TND: What are your individual goals this year and beyond?A.W.: To win the Cyclone (Taylor Cup). That’s the only goal I really have this year. I really have no goals for myself. I just want to win as a team. I really have no goals of being the leading scorer or anything like that. I just want to win as a team.TND: What attracted you to come to Nelson?A.W: The Cyclone Taylor Cup probably is the reason that brought me here. But I also heard Nelson is a good team and I wanted to come to play for a good team.TND: What do you like about playing for this year’s edition of the Leafs?A.W.: I just like how everyone is a team. Everyone loves each other in that dressing room and they’re all good guys and that’s how you know you’ve got a good team is everyone comes together and plays hard for each other.TND: You’ve been out of the lineup with an injury. How difficult is it to be watching from the sidelines?A.W: It really hard. I just want to get out there and help the team. But there’s nothing you can do so you have to wait it out. But it’s definitely difficult watching for sure.TND: You’re a small player. How have you had to adapt to the KIJHL?A.W: This is a tough league to play in and there are a lot of guys out there who are just trying to take your head off.  So you’ve just got to keep your head up  . . .. As long as you have your head up you should be fine. You can’t be scared, that’s for sure if you’re a small guy. You’ve got to be tough and be willing to go into the corners.TND: Is that your biggest adjustment your size?A.W.: This is a pretty fast league and there are guys, who are a lot stronger than me so I need to use my quickness and move out on the ice and be smart.TND: Where do you hope to be next year?A.W.: I don’t know where I’ll be, if it’s back in Nelson, but I’m definitely going to be playing hockey somewhere.TND: Where do you hope to be in five years?A.W.: In five years I want to own a business. I’m going to SAIT (Southern Institute of Technology) in Calgary and take business and hopefully I can own my own business.TND: In 10 years?A.W: Hopefully I’m retired. He may be a rookie but at 5’8″, 150 pounds Calgary native Alec Wilkinson is playing like a season veteran for the Green and White.Wilkinson, one of the Leafs “super pests”, is having a very fine first Kootenay International Junior Hockey League seaso, tied for third on team scoring with another pest, Carsen Willans.Wilkinson is back in the lineup, and will be needed as Nelson is currently in a battle for top spot in the Murdoch Division with the Beaver Valley Nitehawks.Nelson faces two Murdoch opponents this weekend at the NDCC Arena as Castlegar Rebels and Grand Forks Border Bruins come to town Friday and Saturday, respectively.The Nelson Daily.com, in conjunction with Nelson Home Building Centre present a closer look at Wilkinson in the latest Leafs Player Profile of the Week.Nelson Home Building Centre Leafs Player Profile of the Week.Alec WilkinsonAge: 18Born: Calgary, AltaHeight: 5’8”Weight: 150 poundsLeafs Stats: 36 games, 16 goals, 31 assists, 47 pointsYears in Hockey: 12Hometown: Calgary, AltaFavorite NHL Player: Sydney Crosby, Pittsburgh PenguinsFavorite NHL Team: Pittsburgh PenguinsFavorite Music: RapPre-Game Meal: Grilled Cheese SandwichBiggest accomplishment in hockey: Finishing second at the Western Canada Bantam AAA Finals, losing in overtime to WinnipegWork: Pacific InsightNickname: WilkeyOther interests: Snowboarding and Golflast_img read more

My normal, crazy, mixed-up country

first_imgGet me to the church on time. A still from South Africa’s hit movie White Wedding. Jann Turner, the director and joint writer and producer of White Wedding. (Images: White Wedding) This article originally appeared on page six of South Africa Now, a six-page supplement to the Washington Post produced on behalf of Brand South Africa. (Click to enlarge.) MEDIA CONTACTS • Clay Dollarhide New Media – MPRM +1 323 933 3399 [email protected] • MJ Peckos Marketing & Distribution – Dada Films +1 310 273 1444 [email protected] RELATED ARTICLES • Movie draws public – and pirates • New film tackles race with humour • SA short film makes festival finals • Hopeville: a journey of restoration • SA film shines at Zanzibar festivalJann TurnerSouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Are there lions in the streets? Do you live in a mud hut? How come you ain’t … ?As a South African, I get the strangest questions from Americans. Their impression of Africa ranges from the lions-snakes-loincloths version, all the way to the guns-Aids-ghettos version. Often they are wildly off the mark, although, since we hosted the World Cup soccer tournament, they do know that we have stadiums, TV and vuvuzelas.What they don’t know is that we have it all! Wild animals and guns, Aids and ghettos are here, but we also have highways, high schools, high-tech, high-life and high hopes. We’re on Twitter and Facebook and all the other social networks. Charlize Theron is one of us. So is Elon Musk, the PayPal founder and Dave Matthews of the band. We invented super-glue, open-heart surgery and short-range tactical nuclear weapons and we were also the first to ever give up the latter voluntarily.Our country is hauntingly beautiful – beaches, mountains, deserts, forests, cities, jungles. It’s the size of California and Texas combined and 50-million of us live here, of all colours, speaking 11 different languages. Since Nelson Mandela led us out of our painful past, we’re all working hard to get along and make our country a success. And slowly, we’re getting it right. Most of us even have rhythm now.Take Beyonce, Denzel, Obama and Oprah. Throw in LeBron and Tiger. Sprinkle with Bill Gates, Al Sharpton, Pat Buchanan, Spike Lee and Paris Hilton. Make most of them poor, but some rich. Given them each a different language. Now tell them to sort out the US, quickly and peacefully. Get the idea? Ask anyone who visited us for the World Cup. We live in a crazy, mixed-up, fun loving, rich-and-poor, up-and-down place, and we are immensely proud of it.The point I’m trying to make is that South Africa is fast becoming just a normal, crazy mixed-up country. So we – that’s my two partners, Kenneth Nkosi and Rapulana Seiphemo and me – want to tell stories that are fun, real, and normal.So White Wedding came about from a road trip the three of us took across the country about seven years ago – two black dudes and white girl and all the bizarre, funny, typically South African things that we encountered.It was on that long drive that we made up the story about Kenneth (Elvis, the groom) and Rapulana (Tumi, the best man) trying to get from Johannesburg to Cape Town to Elvis’s wedding. Things go wrong – but not in the way you might expect. George (the goat), played by Bella (the goat) isn’t a guest at the wedding – he’s the lunch – a gift from Grandma. Befriended by Rose (the heartbroken British hitch-hiker), George sits in the back seat of the car with Elvis, while Tumi and Rose flirt in the front. Tony, the ex-boyfriend of Ayanda (the bride), pays for her wedding dress. Elvis hasn’t made the transfer from the bank, because he’s lost in mountains, and there’s no phone signal. It’s not really George’s fault that they crash, but in the end, poor George ends up getting cooked and eaten. Or does he?We ended up with a funny, romantic, feel-good road-movie, reminiscent of Sideways and Little Miss Sunshine. We shot the film in 18 days, for a budget of less than U$1-million (R7-million). And South Africans loved it. When did you last see a film in which you laugh at different scenes to the person next to you – and you don’t understand the jokes you are missing? Or when, at the climax, people stand and dance to the soundtrack, shouting in excitement? We heard many stories of black and white strangers hugging each other as the credits rolled, or of employers and their housekeepers sitting side-by-side, shedding simultaneous tears when the story gets weepy.We sent Nelson Mandela a copy for his 91st birthday and he loved it. Mandela is a Xhosa, like Grandma and the beautiful Ayanda, but he wouldn’t mind the gentle fun that is poked at their laid-back, stubborn stereotype. The film gives everyone a bit of a rev.But you don’t need to be South African to appreciate it. At heart, it’s a universal story about love and prejudice. It’s warm, charming, and reminds us that our similarities are greater than our differences. President Obama, you should see it!So … I’m not black. I live in the suburbs, and the lions I hear at night are in the Joburg zoo. But I am South African, and I think Americans are going to like our movie. If you do see it, don’t be afraid to laugh aloud, whistle, dance, cry and applaud during the show. And tell your friends.That’s how we do it.For more information, visit whiteweddingmovie.com.Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB), or read selected articles online:Powering towards a green economySouth Africa plans to build a massive $21.8-billion, 5 000 MW solar park in its semi-desert Northern Cape province as part of an aggressive push to grow its highly industrialised economy without increasing its carbon footprint.The everyday beauty of SowetoSouth African photographer Jodi Bieber has a special ability to bring out the beauty in the ordinary, even the disfigured. On the cover of Time magazine she made a mutilated Afghani girl look beautiful, and in her latest book Soweto she makes everyday township life shine.Launchpad to a billion consumersBy offering to acquire Massmart for some $4.2-billion, Wal-Mart has joined the parade of global companies looking to South Africa as a springboard into what is increasingly seen as the world’s last great investment frontier.A trek to the start of timeIt will probe the edges of our universe. It will be a virtual time machine, helping scientists explore the origins of galaxies. It’s the Square Kilometre Array, and South Africans are at the heart of its development.Brewing up a global brandMiller Lite. Tastes great. Less filling. And brought to you by world-beating South African company SABMiller.Looking south and east for growthAs the shift in global economic power gains momentum, South Africa’s trade is moving eastwards and southwards in a pattern that both reflects the worldwide trend and helps drive it, writes John Battersby.More than just a celluloid Mandela There is a special bond between Hollywood actor Morgan Freeman and the man he played in the Clint Eastwood movie Invictus, South African statesman Nelson Mandela.Africa in the new world orderKgalema Motlanthe, South Africa’s deputy president, looks at how African economies’ resilient performance during the global financial crisis points to the continent’s new place in a changing world.Mining history for new solutionsMark Cutifani, CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company, examines why South Africa’s past is key to successfully doing business here in the future.Turning up the media volumeSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place. After decades of apartheid censorship, the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening, writes Anton Harber.A joule of an energy-efficient carSouth Africa, which builds BMWs and Mercedes Benzes for the US market, is in the thick of the race to deliver a truly practical – and stylish – electric car. Meet the Joule.South Africa: Time to believeThe forgiving philosophy of “ubuntu” helps explain how South Africa managed to transcend its turbulent apartheid past and create a unified democracy, writes Simon Barber.Finding sound real estate investmentSouth Africa’s post-apartheid transformation and new middle class are fuelling demand for affordable homes. For private equity fund International Housing Solutions, that means opportunity.My normal, crazy, mixed-up countrySouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Bring on the braaiAll South Africans love it – including Nobel peace prize-winning Desmond Tutu – and its rich, smoky smell floats over the country every Sunday. Celebrate the braai with our great recipe for making boerewors, traditional South African farmer’s sausage.last_img read more

South Africa looks to ramp up growth

first_img25 October 2011 Amid concerns over a sluggish global economic recovery and an unresolved European debt crisis, South Africa is to focus more on investing in infrastructure and boosting industrial capacity while setting up a special nest-egg fund to support growth. Delivering his Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement in Parliament on Tuesday, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan said that following the 2008-09 global financial crisis, the Eurozone crisis had brought new challenges and threats to global growth. “Once again we face the prospect of declines in global trade, falling industrial demand, delays in investment, liquidation of businesses and stressed financial institutions, this time with the added risk that fiscal austerity in some parts of the world will extend the slowdown and deepen the crisis,” Gordhan said. This year’s Medium-Term Budget sets out the fiscal and budgetary dimensions of the government’s response to the crisis, key to which is to focus spending on creating long-term public assets by investing more in infrastructure and job-creating assets.Keeping govt wage bill in check At the same time, Gordhan plans to reduce the growth in the government’s wage bill by keeping annual increases for public servants at five percent over the next three years. He said public-sector wage settlements had to be balanced against the crucial considerations of the share of spending allocated to social and economic priorities such as infrastructure and social security.Policy reserve, stimulus package Gordhan also mooted the creation of a policy reserve, which would allow for portions of some revenue allocated to departments to be put aside in a separate account, to be drawn on in difficult times. Added to this, he proposed R25-billion in funding over six years to boost industrial development zones and build up world-class businesses, incentivise firms to improve competitiveness, and help support job creation and training projects.Global risks, vulnerability of exports While global economic recovery has slowed, although moderate growth is expected over the next three years, Gordhan singled out the risk of the unresolved European debt crisis to bank recapitalisation and slow growth of the US. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has lowered its global growth forecast for 2011 and 2012 from 4.5% to 4%. Gordhan said after their strong recovery last year, international trade volumes had flattened this year and added that South Africa remained heavily reliant on its traditional developed country partners of the US, EU and Japan, making exports vulnerable to a slowdown in advanced economies. He called on exporters to improve their productivity and keep their input costs down to get more lasting benefits from a more competitive currency – which he said had fluctuated between January and October from R6.58 to the dollar to R8.25 to the dollar. In a media briefing earlier today, the National Treasury’s Director-General, Lungisa Fuzile, said South Africa’s foreign exchange reserves were at about the right level now – at about six months worth of imports.GDP forecast revised down to 3.1% Meanwhile in his speech, Gordhan said growth in the domestic economy had slowed from 4.5% in the first quarter to 1.3% in the second quarter. He attributed this to the strikes that hit the country in the middle of this year and to slower household consumption, as well as the fallout in global trade resulting from the tsunami in Japan in March. Gross domestic product (GDP) growth is expected to increase by 3.1% this year (down from the 3.4% forecast in the Budget in February) and move up to 3.4% next year, before lifting to 4.3% in 2014, as the current global uncertainty subsides.The jobs challenge While revealing that the National Treasury had received 2 651 applications under the Jobs Fund, launched in June, Gordhan also pointed to the country’s worsening unemployment rate. Only 210 000 jobs were added in the 15 months of the recovery to June this year, while unemployment had risen from 21.8% in the fourth quarter of 2008 to 25.7% in the second quarter of this year, he said. The unemployment rate did not include the estimated 2.2-million workers who had stopped looking for work, he said, adding that much of the new jobs in the formal sector outside of the agricultural sector, were created in the public sector. Gordhan warned that South Africa’s current projected GDP growth remained too weak to meet the employment targets of the country’s New Growth Path – to create five-million jobs by 2020. He said measures were needed to improve capital budgets, change the way network industries operated and promote competition, while strengthening skills and education.Inflation forecast Meanwhile, South Africa’s inflation rate is expected to breach the 3% to 6% target band temporarily in the first quarter of next year and to average over 5.5% over the next three years. Gordhan said rising food and petrol prices had seen inflation move from 3.2% in September last year to 5.7% in September. Increases in prices set by government agencies was a major factor in fuelling inflation, as 14 of the 18 administered price components were above 6% – with double-digit increases in electricity, water supply, refuse collection and sewerage prices. The ratio of household debt to disposable income, though still high, had declined from a peak of 82% in the first half of 2008 to 75.9% in the second quarter of this year. Gordhan said low levels of credit demand, a sluggish housing market and high levels of non-performing loans, had contributed to muted growth in credit extension to households. The Reserve Bank had, however, kept the repo rate unchanged at a 30-year low of 5.5% since November last year, he said.Capital investment forecast After falling 3.7% last year, gross fixed capital formation was expected to increase 2.9% this year and 4.5% next year, before moving to a 6.3% increase in 2014. Private fixed capital investment grew at 4% in the second quarter, mainly on the back of purchases of machinery and transport equipment. Investment in mining and communications registered the fastest growth in the first half of 2011, with overall investment growing at two percent in this period compared to the same period in the year before. However, despite this, real investment in the second quarter of this year was still eight percent below its pre-crisis peak. BuaNewslast_img read more

Southern African states work to save forests

first_img11 August 2015The first collaborative workshop on forest management and timber trade between Namibia, Angola and Zambia ended last week, on 7 August, with agreement reached on developing a time-bound action plan for collective forest management and timber trade.Directors of forestry and support staff from the three countries met at the workshop, hosted by the Directorate of Forestry of Namibia and supported by Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC), a Namibian NGO, and Traffic under a Sasscal timber project.Timber is by some margin the most valuable wildlife commodity traded, according to Traffic. In the early 1990s, it estimated that the global timber trade was worth about $104-billion (R1.3-trillion today), approximately 65% of the total worldwide wildlife trade. By 2009, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the US estimated the annual turnover at more than $200-billion.Traffic senior programme officer Markus Burgener welcomed the development of the forestry action plan which would “address the growing concern that timber species found in Namibia, Angola and Zambia are subject to overharvesting and associated illegal and unregulated trade”.High-value species including Pterocarpus angolensis (kiaat), Baikaiea plurijuga (Zambezi teak) and Guibourtia coleosperma (rosewood) are used domestically for construction but the majority of wood extracted is exported from the region as sawn timber to supply markets in Asia and South Africa. Given the cross-border nature of the trade, Traffic believes it is critical for the three countries to collaborate in addressing the related challenges to ensure that trade in the species is legal and sustainable.Capacity and policy challengesIt said the meeting aimed to identify the key issues associated with forest management and the timber trade, and develop a collaborative action plan for addressing them. Through information sharing and open discussion, the main challenges identified included inadequate communication between the countries, lack of awareness of forestry regulations, limited information and data sharing, capacity resource shortfalls and legislation and policy gaps.Having identified these issues, the three countries collectively developed a time- bound action plan which includes the development of a memorandum of understanding for collective forest management and timber trade. Other key areas targeted by the plan include harmonisation of documentation, greater sharing of information and data, and cross-border collaboration for increased compliance.The plan also addresses the need, in all three countries, for capacity building to tackle the overharvesting and illegal trade of timber effectively.Directors of the three nations asked for an annual workshop to be held to monitor the implementation of the action plan, with plans to encourage greater participation of the other Southern African Development Community countries.Conservation of woodlandsThe workshop resulted in the development of a clearly articulated set of actions and the strengthening of relationships between the three forestry directorates.“These outcomes provide a strong platform for the conservation of woodlands in the region,” said Burgener.Traffic is a non-governmental organisation working globally on trade in wild animals and plants in the context of biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. It is a strategic alliance between the World Wide Fund for Nature and IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature.Sasscal, the Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management, is a joint initiative of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, and Germany, responding to the challenges of global change.Traffic has a variety of projects investigating and monitoring the timber trade in Africa, Asia, North and South America and Europe. In Africa, it supports the work of Comifac, the Central African forests commission. Traffic seeks to provide expertise in policy and legal reviews, monitoring of timber trade including illegal trade, bushmeat trade, capacity building and training, and assist in the implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites).In South Africa, it is helping the government to monitor the timber trade with neighbouring countries, including providing capacity building and training for species identification, enforcement assistance, and advice on how to enhance controls of the trade.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

How Latin America Became a Global Leader in Electronic Invoicing

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Andres Abumohor Tags:#business management#financial technology#Fintech#international#invoicing#Latin America#latin american technology#SMEs Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Co-Founder and COO of OmniBnk, a neobank that provides financial services to SMEs in Latin America. In 2003, Chile became one of the first countries in the world to implement electronic invoicing, and several other countries have since followed suit. Latin America has long been a global leader in electronic invoicing, the practice of submitting and formalizing every business invoice through the government. Of the world’s 36 billion electronic invoices issued in 2017, 15 billion came from Latin America.Electronic invoicing (e-invoicing) has many advantages; among them increased transparency and control over taxable income. In a region characterized by informal economies, e-invoices allow governments to track and tax business transactions more appropriately. At least three countries are on their way to making e-invoices mandatory for every company within the next few years. E-invoicing also helps small businesses tackle the tax process more efficiently, eliminating the need to hire additional accountants and complicated tax-management software. While processing invoices through the government might seem strange, or even invasive, to business owners in the US, Latin American business owners have been open to the process and its benefits. Several countries now require e-invoicing for every transaction, so many small businesses have had to adapt quickly to comply. However, the time and capital they save as a result is worth it.The benefits of e-invoicing for Latin American governments and business owners E-invoicing requirements have triggered a number of positive impacts on local economies across Latin America. For instance, Mexico implemented e-invoicing for all businesses starting in 2012 and made it mandatory in 2014. Between 2012 and 2017, Mexico increased the tax revenue rate for the government from 37.4% to 57.7%. Beyond improving tax collection rates, e-invoicing has allowed Latin America to become a global leader in factoring, specifically invoice-backed factoring. Factoring allows businesses to access liquidity by selling their invoices at a discount to lenders. While traditional factoring based on a few invoices often demands very high interest rates (although still much lower than unsecured credit), mandatory e-invoices mean factoring companies have the potential to access more data to back their loans . The possibility of more data means less risk and lower interest rates for small businesses. Latin America’s advancements in these two fields have rubbed off on other countries over the past few years. South Korea adopted mandatory electronic invoicing in 2011, Denmark in 2005, and Italy and Finland will require e-invoices for every B2B transaction by the end of this year. The use of e-invoicing is on the rise One of Europe’s leading fintech companies, OakNorth, automates the analysis of data from documents like e-invoices to provide loans to SMEs. Using a combination of machine learning and detailed financial data, OakNorth is able to provide between $500K-$25M loans in a matter of days, rather than weeks or months. This is a significant improvement in the SME lending industry where SMEs currently face a credit gap of $2.1-$2.6 trillion globally. A few companies in Latin America have already taken advantage of similar circumstances since many SMEs do not have access to formal financial institutions, like banks, that could provide them with loans to grow. Argentina and Brazil claim to be the first in the region to make invoice digitization mandatory in 2007 and 2008, respectively, even though Chile is considered the pioneer of implementing the technology in Latin America. Chile passed a law in 2014 that required all companies to provide e-invoices with the idea of slowly integrating all companies by the end of 2019. Before that, many businesses used e-invoicing, but it was not enforced.Mexico finished their integration process by the end of 2018, becoming a regional leader in e-invoicing, with almost 100% of businesses submitting invoices digitally. Nearly every country in the region has made e-invoices available, but not yet mandatory. Brazil, Mexico, Chile, and Argentina are often showcased regionally – and even globally – as examples of the opportunities that come with widespread e-invoicing usage.Colombia was the most recent country to oblige all businesses to provide e-invoices; the law regulating it came into force on January 1st, 2019. Ecuador has a national rollout plan to make e-invoices fully mandatory by 2023 by integrating new businesses every six months. Today, Peru requires e-invoices for over 100,000 large companies and plans to include SMEs by 2020. Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, Guatemala, Panama, Honduras, and Costa Rica all have plans in place to integrate e-invoicing into their tax regulations as well.A blueprint for the rest of the worldDespite its numerous informal economies and low banking rates, Latin America is a noteworthy leader of electronic invoicing, and the region has been for several years. Not only does this digitalization help tax authorities keep track of transactions, but it also helps business owners save time and money. They can manage all of their finances online and store data that can be used to back factoring and lending operations. While the US and parts of Europe still depend on legacy technologies based on self-reporting and paper invoices, Latin America’s e-invoicing systems have soared ahead, quashing tax evasion and creating a route for SMEs to leap forward in the digital age. The Top 5 Issues Faced by Futurists 6 User-Interface Musts for Personal Finance Appslast_img read more

Napa elated as Wangs Basketball-Letran off to a good start

first_imgFor the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next LATEST STORIES “We just have to work on our defense so that we can play well in our games,” he said.Wangs Basketball-Letran returns to the court on Monday against Che’Lu Bar and Grill-San Sebastian. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises View commentscenter_img 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting “Everything we worked on, everything coach Jeff taught us on defense, we were able to do in the game,” said the 23-year-old guard, who finished with 15 points, five rebounds, and three assists in his debut with his new squad.For Batiller, the key for this easy transition is the team willingly welcoming newcomers like him, Fajarito, and Larry Muyang to the team — something which could only mean good things for Wangs Basketball-Letran this conference and with the Knights in the long run.“They accepted us wholeheartedly and they trust us that we can help the team. I think that’s the reason why we’re playing the way we were againts AMA,” said the transferee from University of the East.Napa, however, knows that the best is yet to come for the Couriers as players like Jerrick Balanza and Fran Yu are still on their way back from their injuries.But as always, regardless who is on the floor, the mild-mannered mentor only wants to see nothing but no-frills basketball from his wards.ADVERTISEMENT “I’m happy with how we played and I’m positive with this team’s potential. I built this team and no matter what happens, this will be the players I will lean in from now up to the NCAA season,” the mentor said in Filipino.Napa’s expectations were realized when his side bucked the nerves early in the game and slowly built the 12-point cushion, 38-26 in the second quarter, before pulling away and taking a 22-point lead, 81-59, at one point in the payoff period.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“In the start, I felt they were excited, but when we finally got our rhythm, we made a big run and everything went as planned,” he said.Batiller echoed his coach’s observations and was elated that all of the team’s hardwork in the offseason was paid off with the win. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PBA IMAGESCoach Jeff Napa was proud to see his team’s hard work come to life as Wangs Basketball-Letran impressed in its season-opener against AMA Online Education on Tuesday.Newcomers like Bonbon Batiller and Christian Fajarito seamlessly blended in with Knights holdovers like Bong Quinto, JP Calvo, and Jeo Ambohot as the Couriers cruised to the 93-75 victory over the Titans.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH LeBron James becomes seventh to reach 30,000 career pointslast_img read more