Some child, left behind?

first_imgWith congressional Republicans poised to introduce legislation to reauthorize and overhaul No Child Left Behind policies in the coming days, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan ’86 urged lawmakers Monday to repeal and replace the much-maligned 2001 federal education law.In remarks tied to the 50th anniversary of the landmark Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s anti-poverty and civil rights push and the progenitor of No Child Left Behind, Duncan called for legislators to correct the legacy of historic inequality in American public schools and ensure that all children are prepared for college and the modern workplace through necessary reforms, like providing high-quality preschool, while offering $2.7 billion in additional education funding. Duncan challenged lawmakers to fix the “out-of-date, tired, and prescriptive” law without discarding some key elements, such as annual testing of students and related performance evaluations of teachers. “The days in which lawmakers support schools that are good enough for someone else’s children — but not for their own — those days must be over,” he said.In 2013, Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), a former U.S. education secretary and now chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, unsuccessfully put forward a bill to update No Child Left Behind. He has been an outspoken critic of “excessive regulation” by the federal government over public education standards and operations.Martin West, Ph.D. ’06, an associate professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education, studies K-12 education policy and reforms. He spoke with the Gazette about the No Child Left Behind law, a cornerstone act of President George W. Bush’s administration, and the political and practical complications of revising it.GAZETTE: What did you take away from Secretary Duncan’s remarks, and is it likely that he can shape the pending reforms given the new Republican majority in Congress?WEST: Clearly, the speech is an attempt to lay down the [Obama] administration’s priorities with respect to the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It’s an attempt to also draw some lines in the sand with respect to changes they don’t want to see come out of Congress. The fact that he’s delivering a speech now is a reflection of the fact that the newly Republican Congress is moving very quickly toward a reauthorization bill, and this is indeed an attempt to shape that process in Congress. At this point, they have very little leverage, frankly. They may ultimately have leverage at the end of the day because if Congress is successful in passing a bill, then the president will have an opportunity to veto it. But at this point, the real action is taking place in Congress. It’s taking place largely in the Senate, where new chair Lamar Alexander needs to find a handful of Democrats to support a bill. What is striking is the extent to which the debate that’s now taking place is on a playing field that Senator Alexander and the Republicans have staked out — in the 2013 effort, but even more recently by raising the question of whether the federal government might not require as many tests as it had under No Child Left Behind, something that wasn’t considered even by the House Republicans in 2013. They’ve forced the administration to lay out as its principal priority holding the line on that front.GAZETTE: Nearly everyone seems to agree that No Child Left Behind is a flawed piece of legislation, but disagree on the reasons why. What are some of the issues that have arisen as a result of this law?WEST: Most people say No Child Left Behind has made something of a contribution by providing much-needed transparency about the level at which students are performing in American schools and, in particular, calling attention to gaps in achievement along lines of race, ethnicity, and class. But the chief concerns are that No Child Left Behind didn’t just provide transparency about student achievement; it also required states to establish accountability systems that sanctioned schools that were not meeting performance targets on an annual basis, and the accountability system that states were required to use was unrealistic in its expectations for the pace of improvement in student achievement. The accountability system also was based purely on the level at which students are performing rather than the amount of progress students make over time. Therefore, in many cases it did not provide a good gauge of schools’ effectiveness in improving student achievement.Those were really the two fundamental flaws with respect to the design of the accountability system, and so you heard Secretary Duncan speaking about that today when he was saying that No Child Left Behind was too “prescriptive.” It was prescriptive specifically about the design of state accountability systems and what states should be required to do when schools fail to meet performance targets set out for them by those accountability systems. The question is what exactly to do about it. Republicans would like to return control over the design of state accountability systems — and what to do when schools are identified as underperforming — back to states. Secretary Duncan today called for more flexibility for states, but argued that it was important to maintain some oversight of state accountability systems to ensure that the problem of low-performing schools wouldn’t go unaddressed.GAZETTE: Has it been a failure of design or of implementation and, if so, why?WEST: If it’s a failure, I think it’s a failure of design. The evidence would suggest that No Child Left Behind has led to modest improvements in student achievement in math that were most pronounced for low-income students and traditionally disadvantaged minorities — exactly the students whom the law was attempting to reach.That being said, especially in recent years as the expectations for improvements in school performance under the No Child Left Behind accountability system continued to rise, you had more and more schools identified as underperforming, and you had growing evidence that the accountability system was having some unintended consequences when it came to the strategy schools were using to meet those performance targets, whether it be narrowing their curricula to focus on math and reading as opposed to other areas; engaging in excessive test preparation; or just administering too many tests as a means to try to prepare students to perform well on the state test. None of these things were required by No Child Left Behind. Many of them, I would argue, are actually counterproductive when it comes to improving student performance, even as measured by standardized tests. These things were not going on everywhere, but clearly they were happening in some places.GAZETTE: Why is standardized testing such a contentious aspect of this law? Is it too frequent and overvalued as a metric, as teachers’ unions and others contend, and what is the right amount?WEST: [Duncan] is saying we should maintain what No Child Left Behind currently requires, which is that students be tested in math and reading annually in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school, and that students be tested three times at least in science. That’s a total of 17 tests that states are required by the federal government to administer. I would say the evidence is increasingly clear that standardized tests in math and reading are valid indicators of student learning that matters for important adult outcomes that we all value, whether it be postsecondary educational success or employment and earnings. So it’s useful that we continue to provide information on the extent to which students are learning. Standardized tests don’t capture everything we want to know about the performance of schools and students, but without the information that they provide, we are in a much worse position when it comes to evaluating the performance of our education system.I do think it’s important that we maintain annual testing where it’s currently required … because that’s the only way you can look at the growth in student achievement over time, from one year to the next. The growth in student achievement from one year to the next is a much better indicator of a school’s contribution to student learning than the level at which students are performing at a single point in time, which is heavily influenced by factors beyond the school’s control. This goes back to the design of the No Child Left Behind accountability system. You might ask, why did the federal government design a system in the first place that was based exclusively on the level of student performance? The answer to that is that’s all states were really in a position to do when No Child Left Behind was first enacted, because the requirements for annual testing were only implemented in the years following. They had no real alternative to using student achievement levels rather than measures of growth over time.GAZETTE: Given that past efforts to revise the law have withered on the vine and the increasing politicization of education policy between the two parties, are there any revisions that might satisfy Democrats and Republicans?WEST: The prospects of getting a bill through Congress are better than they have been at any point since the law was first scheduled for reauthorization in 2007 because you have unified control of Congress and because the Republicans who are interested in scaling back the federal government’s involvement in K-12 education policy are in a position to capitalize on some of the current discontent with testing. The question will ultimately come down to whether the Obama administration is willing to sign a bill that, without doubt, will not include as requirements some of the major policies that they have tried to advance through other means during the president’s time in office. One would be a requirement that states adopt teacher-evaluation systems based in part on measures of student learning. The Obama administration first encouraged states to create those systems through the “Race to the Top” grant competition. It then required states to adopt those systems in order to receive flexibility from No Child Left Behind through its state waiver program. Now the question is, should those requirements be built into the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act? Many Republicans in Congress support those types of teacher-evaluation systems, but they feel strongly that requiring states to adopt them from Washington is going to be counterproductive because those systems need to be designed at the local level in order to be effective.GAZETTE: Some of the expected Republican-led changes — cutting competitive grant programs, reducing testing, and giving greater power to states to set their own achievement and accountability standards — do those undermine the goal of creating a national educational framework or baseline for all students to ensure equitability?WEST: A greater regulation of state standards, and certainly any attempt to require states to participate in the Common Core [of standards], is another example of something you won’t see in a reauthorization bill coming out of Congress. You’ve just identified the great tension in federal education policy, which is that we know it’s very hard to get things done from Washington, that you can make states do something but you can’t always make them do it well, and that suggests the need for some caution with respect to what the federal government requires. We know that too much federal prescriptiveness may actually prevent states from innovating in ways that would be useful. On the other hand, we know that, left to their own devices, states don’t always have the best track record, especially with respect to ensuring that traditionally disadvantaged students are well served. And that calls for greater federal regulation and oversight. That’s a tension policymakers have been wrestling with since the initial passage of the initial Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 1965. The general trajectory has been toward more federal oversight and regulation, and I’m fairly confident that the next step will be in the direction of somewhat less federal involvement.This interview was edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

Senate Majority in Limbo as Perdue Re-election Race Goes to Runoff in Georgia

first_imgSenator David Perdue, Republican of Georgia, was fighting for his political life on Friday in a contest that could determine which party controls the Senate, as his re-election bid headed to a January runoff against Jon Ossoff, his Democratic challenger.Mr. Perdue had a razor-thin lead over Mr. Ossoff in a contest that demonstrated Democrats’ emerging strength in what was once a Republican stronghold in the Deep South. Neither candidate claimed a majority of votes amid a protracted count, according to The Associated Press.- Advertisement – Mr. Perdue, a first-term Republican, had come tantalizingly close to winning outright and avoiding a runoff altogether. He led after election night, but as Democratic counties around Atlanta and Savannah continued to count and report ballots on Friday, he had dipped just below the 50 percent threshold needed to win under Georgia law. The state’s other looming runoff is a special election to fill the seat vacated by retired Republican Johnny Isakson and could more of a wild card. Dr. Warnock, 51, the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, which the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once led, emerged as the front-runner after Tuesday’s voting, but there were more than a dozen candidates on the ballot. The inconclusive result set up a dramatic rematch between Mr. Perdue and Mr. Ossoff on Jan. 5, and thrust Georgia into the center of the nation’s political fray as Joseph R. Biden Jr. appeared on track to win the White House. The state had already been slated to decide the fate of its second Senate seat in a special-election runoff between the Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and Senator Kelly Loeffler, a Republican, the same day. That makes it nearly certain that the twin Georgia races will determine which party controls the chamber just two weeks before the next presidential inauguration.“Change has come to Georgia,” Mr. Ossoff said at a rally on Friday, “and Georgia is a part of the change coming to America.” Mr. Perdue pounded Mr. Ossoff as too extreme for the state, distorting many of the Democrat’s positions on policing, health care and a range of other issues to try to scare moderate voters to his side. He praised Republicans’ tax and regulatory cuts, as well as the popular programs Congress approved to help unemployed Americans and small businesses weather the pandemic. If Mr. Biden wins the White House, and Democrats take both of Georgia’s seats, they would draw the Senate to a 50-50 tie, effectively taking control of the chamber given the vice president’s power to cast tiebreaking votes. But that is a tall order in a state with deep conservative roots, and Republicans felt reasonably confident they could hang onto at least one of the seats needed to deny Democrats the majority.- Advertisement – Mr. Perdue’s campaign made clear immediately that he would seek to nationalize the race, saying a vote for Mr. Ossoff was “a vote to hand power to Chuck Schumer and the radical Democrats in Washington.”“We are excited for overtime — it gives us even more time to continue exposing Jon Ossoff and his radical socialist agenda,” Ben Fry, his campaign manager, said, adding a dig at Mr. Ossoff, who lost a high-profile special election for a House seat in 2017. “Jon Ossoff does two things well: burn through out-of-state liberal money and lose elections.” In a good sign for Republicans approaching the runoff, Mr. Perdue outperformed Mr. Trump in Tuesday’s voting, and Mr. Ossoff trailed Mr. Biden.Mr. Ossoff, 33, tried to portray Mr. Perdue as a flunky for special interests who failed Georgia in a time of crisis and was putting people’s health care at risk by pressing to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Citing reports that Mr. Perdue was trading stocks early in the pandemic, Mr. Ossoff accused the senator of having been more interested in his own financial success than that of Georgians.“Retirement is coming for Senator David Perdue,” Mr. Ossoff said on Friday. “A senator who saw fit to continue to attack our health care in the midst of a pandemic. A senator who told us that this disease that has taken a quarter of a million lives was no deadlier than the ordinary flu while he looked out for himself.”Mindful of the power of the state’s sizable Black electorate, Mr. Ossoff tied himself closely to Representative John Lewis, the civil rights icon and longtime Atlanta congressman who died this year. Mostly, though, he sought to capitalize on a wave of antipathy toward Mr. Trump in a state where the coronavirus has taken a deadly toll. Mr. Perdue, 70, a former chief executive of Reebok and Dollar General who beat his Democratic opponent by eight points in 2014, was initially expected to have an easy road to re-election.But he was weighed down by voters’ displeasure with President Trump’s coronavirus response, and by his own missteps. He faced accusations of anti-Semitism after running a Facebook advertisement that enlarged the nose of Mr. Ossoff, who is Jewish, a move his campaign blamed on a vendor. He struggled to keep up with Mr. Ossoff’s prodigious fund-raising, which exploded in mid-October after Mr. Perdue publicly mocked the first name of Senator Kamala Harris, his colleague in the Senate for nearly four years and the Democrats’ nominee for vice president.“Kah-MAH-lah or KAH-mah-lah or Kamamboamamla — I don’t know,” he said at a rally for Mr. Trump in Macon. Mr. Perdue’s campaign said he had “simply mispronounced” the first name of Ms. Harris, a Black woman of Indian and Jamaican descent. Mr. Ossoff called it bullying and suggested it was racially insensitive.As in his 2014 campaign, Mr. Perdue ran as a Washington outsider, campaigning in a denim jacket rather than the expensive tailored suits he wears in the Senate. The case was harder to make this time given his six-year record there. But he tied his campaign closely to another onetime outsider, Mr. Trump, and pushed ahead. Two other Senate races, in North Carolina and in Alaska, had not yet been called. But Republicans were leading in both and expected to win, putting them at 50 seats to the Democrats’ 48.Both parties were already busy on Friday readying for the nine-week sprint, and they were expected to deluge the state with tens of millions of dollars more in advertising to try to turn out their voters. For Democrats, it will be a bank-shot attempt to harness total control of Washington after a spate of otherwise disappointing congressional elections. Should Mr. Biden win, Republicans will be motivated to deny him the majority, holding onto considerable power to shape at least the first two years of his term and thwarting liberal ambitions.Regardless of what happens, the runoffs were a clear sign of Democrats’ growing power in a once solidly conservative state. After years of predictions, the mobilization of Black voters and movement toward Democrats by educated white women in Atlanta’s suburbs signaled that Georgia’s status as a true battleground state might finally have arrived.- Advertisement – Updated Nov. 6, 2020, 8:30 p.m. ET He has run as a progressive, vowing to expand the Affordable Care Act and push for sweeping changes to policing and the criminal justice system to root out anti-Black bias.Ms. Loeffler, 49, overcame a stiff challenge from Representative Doug Collins, a fellow Republican. She poured more than $20 million of her own fortune into the race and had the backing of the state’s Republican governor and Senate Republicans’ campaign apparatus, who believed Ms. Loeffler’s record as a businesswoman could win back independent suburban voters, particularly women.But the fight to edge out Mr. Collins turned bitter and personal, driving Ms. Loeffler to the hard right. She courted the support of Marjorie Taylor Greene, a QAnon conspiracy theorist who won a House seat on Tuesday in Georgia, and took other positions that could be hard to walk back in January even as she tries to reorient the campaign around her success as a businesswoman and record in Washington dealing with the coronavirus crisis.On Thursday, she had already begun attacking Dr. Warnock, giving a glimpse of a playbook that will try to mine his language from years on the pulpit and liberal policy positions to portray him as a pastor in the mold of the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., the former pastor of former President Barack Obama, whose “God damn America,” sermon was used to attack the former president.But Republicans are getting a late start. Consumed for much of the year with holding off Mr. Collins, Ms. Loeffler left Dr. Warnock largely untouched as he introduced himself to voters on purely positive terms as a pastor and healer.Anticipating a barrage of attacks on the horizon, Dr. Warnock used his first advertisement of the runoff, a spoof of a campaign-style attack ad, released on Thursday to try to prime voters for what was coming.“Get ready Georgia, the negative ads are coming,” he says. “Kelly Loeffler doesn’t want to talk about why she’s for getting rid of health care in the middle of a pandemic, so she’s going to try and scare you with lies about me.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

ACC Roundup: Upset in Louisville, mercy rule employed for Boston College and more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Week 2 of college football didn’t disappoint after an exciting Week 1. There was an upset at Louisville, shortened quarters in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts and Atlantic Coast Conference play opened:Intra-conference matchups: Syracuse’s (2-0, 1-0 ACC) defense tightened up in the second-half of Saturday’s game to stop Wake Forest (1-1, 0-1) while the Orange’s true freshman quarterback Eric Dungey led a charge to capture the 30-17 Syracuse victory in the Carrier Dome.You can read all The Daily Orange’s coverage of the game here.Winners:AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNo. 10 Florida State (2-0), despite having just 6 passing yards at halftime from transfer quarterback Everett Golson, broke the 7-7 tie with South Florida in the second half when sophomore running back Dalvin Cook erupted. Cook finished with the second-best rushing day in school history with 266 rushing yards as the Seminoles won 34-14.Florida Atlantic started its backup quarterback and lost its starting running back after the first half, yet the score was knotted at 20 with Miami (2-0) in the third quarter. Five FAU turnovers gave Miami the ball often and Hurricanes running back Mark Walton didn’t squander the opportunities, rushing for three touchdowns.Sitting on the sideline in a neck brace out indefinitely, Mike Williams, the All-ACC Clemson receiver, saw his team get off to a sluggish start only to come roaring back. No. 12 Clemson (2-0) crushed Appalachian State — for which there’d be no Michigan magic — 41-10 Saturday afternoon behind quarterback Deshaun Watson’s three touchdown passes.Boston College (2-0) demolished Howard, 76-0. Tyler Rouse ran for three scores before the second-half quarters were shortened from 15 minutes to 10. Boston College coach Steve Addazio still wanted to prepare for his team’s upcoming Friday night national TV matchup against Florida State, but didn’t want to keep pressing. Redshirt Troy Flutie, the nephew of BC legend Doug Flutie — threw his first career touchdown.For the second game in a row, No. 16 Georgia Tech (2-0) dominated its opponent en route to a relaxing second half. The Yellow Jackets blew out Tulane 65-10 and quarterback Justin Thomas, who played one quarter in the Georgia Tech Week 1 win, threw two touchdowns.Despite eventually losing to unanimous No. 1 Ohio State in Week 1, Virginia Tech (1-1) entered halftime of that game with a lead. The Hokies had lost quarterback Michael Brewer in the second half and backup Brenden Motley entered. Motley led Virginia Tech to a 42-3 win over Furman in Week 2, throwing for two scores and running for another.Thirteen minutes of the first quarter had passed when Duke (2-0) scored its first touchdown on a 24-yard Thomas Sirk pass. It’s the longest stretch the Blue Devils went without scoring all game as Duke went on to score six more touchdowns and kick two field goals in the final three quarters. The Blue Devils beat North Carolina Central 55-0 on Saturday.North Carolina (1-1) took care of an in-state foe Saturday when it defeated North Carolina A&T by a score of 53-14. The Tar Heels led 36-0 at halftime behind two Brandon Fritts touchdown catches and two more Elijah Hood touchdown runs.After failing to score in the first quarter, North Carolina State (2-0) punched in five touchdowns to beat Eastern Kentucky 35-0. Matthew Dayes ran for three scores in the second half and finished the day with 116 yards on 24 carries.Last September, Akron stunned Pittsburgh with a 21-10 victory at Heinz Field. This September, no such thing happened. Pittsburgh (2-0) punished the Zips 24-7 in Akron. Tennessee transfer Nate Peterman threw for a career-high 148 yards and his first collegiate touchdown after taking over for starter Chad Voytik in the second quarter. Pitt coach Pat Narduzzi said he’ll still employ the two-quarterback rotation system in the foreseeable future.Losers: A week after playing a tight road contest with, but losing to, No. 6 Auburn, Louisville (0-2) was upset at home. Houston had no problem scoring as quarterback Greg Ward Jr. threw two of his three touchdowns in the fourth quarter, including a 15-yard game-winner with 3:09 left. The Cougars special teams blocked a Cardinals 53-yard field-goal attempt to tie with 54 seconds remaining. Louisville head coach Bobby Petrino pulled starting quarterback Lamar Jackson in the fourth quarter and replaced him with Kyle Bolin.No. 9 Notre Dame’s 34-27 win over Virginia (0-2) came at a cost. The Fighting Irish lost starting quarterback Malik Zaire for the rest of the season when he broke his ankle in the third quarter on a designed quarterback run. A week ago against Texas, Notre Dame’s starting running back Tarean Folston was injured. The backups, quarterback Deshone Kizer and running back C.J. Prosise combined for 247 total yards and three touchdowns in the comeback win. Comments Published on September 13, 2015 at 2:24 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TRlast_img read more

A Lusty Christmas Eve Tradition

first_imgFor those who celebrate the Feast of the Seven Fishes (also called La Vigilia), The Lusty Lobster is a one-stop shop for the meal many families of Italian heritage enjoy on Christmas Eve. By Eileen Moon Then there’s The Lusty Lobster crowd, the folks who make picking up seafood for the Feast of the Seven Fishes – or maybe just a tray of cocktail shrimp – a not-to-be-missed part of the holiday. A large lobster, bedecked with Christmas decorations, greets customers purchasing oysters, crabs, octopus and yes, lobster, for their Feast of the Seven Fishes menu Christmas Eve. Photo by Eileen Moon “We have an elf thatgoes out with hot chocolateand popcorn,” he said. The Lusty Lobster store in Highlands, 88 Bay Ave. In any case, celebrating the holiday requires a lot of fish. Although, Douty points out, many seafood buyers are OK with counting two different recipes using the same fish in calculating the seven. Say, shrimp cocktail and fried shrimp. Or crabcakes and crab claws. However it adds up, it’s worth standing in line for, apparently. So Douty and his staff work hard to keep their customers entertained. McDonough heralds theopening of the doors with afew bars of “The HallelujahChorus.” And often it’s the men who are in charge of the seafood errand while the rest of the family is presumably engaged in other tasks. There are various interpretations why the number seven comprises the family feast, including that it’s based on the seven sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church or that it’s based on the biblical account of the creation of the world in the Book of Genesis, in which God rested on the seventh day. But when the business closes at 3 p.m., they all rejoice in a job well done. center_img Doug Douty, owner of The Lusty Lobster, has been supplying Two River-area homes with fish and seafood for 40 years. Photo by Eileen Moon “By then, the line is down the street,” he said. “They sing along, make requests and share the popcorn and hot chocolate served by The Lusty elves.” Meanwhile, Douty and his staff are working hard to make sure all the customers go home with the requested makings of their holiday feast. “We don’t open until 10, but people start getting in line at 8 a.m. to make sure they get a good place in line,” said Doug Douty, who has owned the seafood emporium for 40 years. And along about 10 a.m., musician Andy McDonough arrives with his keyboard to entertain the crowd. “It’s a riot,” McDonough said. “I’ve had the pleasure to do it for a few years now and it’s just a special morning. There’s a crew that gets there early in cold, rain, whatever. They joke around about having been sent by their respective families and they huddle around the door until it opens up.” But there’s plenty of fun to be had while waiting to pick up orders that range from fresh lobster, crabs and oysters to octopus, squid and baccala, a salted cod that is a beloved part of many Italian American Christmas feasts. Rain, shine, sleet, snow, it doesn’t matter. They’ll be there. It’s not just an errand. It’s a tradition. It’s a long, busy day for Douty and his staff. “We open a lot of clams and oysters,” he said. HIGHLANDS – Some people celebrate Christmas Eve with one last trip to the mall. Others are all done by then and enjoying making cookies, wrapping gifts or watching one of the Hallmark Christmas movies that always have a happy ending. “We have a nice little family here,” Douty said. Once the doors close on Christmas Eve, Lusty Lobster won’t re-open until Dec. 27. “We let all the hard-working elves take an extra day off,” he said.last_img read more

Nelson Home Building Centre Leafs Player Profile of the Week — Alec Wilkinson

first_imgTwitter, Facebook, Instagram: InstagramThe Nelson Daily:  What type of player are you?Alec Wilkerson: I’m a playmaker. I just look for my teammates on the ice. I have good vision and I’m more of a passer than a scorer, for sure.TND: What are your individual goals this year and beyond?A.W.: To win the Cyclone (Taylor Cup). That’s the only goal I really have this year. I really have no goals for myself. I just want to win as a team. I really have no goals of being the leading scorer or anything like that. I just want to win as a team.TND: What attracted you to come to Nelson?A.W: The Cyclone Taylor Cup probably is the reason that brought me here. But I also heard Nelson is a good team and I wanted to come to play for a good team.TND: What do you like about playing for this year’s edition of the Leafs?A.W.: I just like how everyone is a team. Everyone loves each other in that dressing room and they’re all good guys and that’s how you know you’ve got a good team is everyone comes together and plays hard for each other.TND: You’ve been out of the lineup with an injury. How difficult is it to be watching from the sidelines?A.W: It really hard. I just want to get out there and help the team. But there’s nothing you can do so you have to wait it out. But it’s definitely difficult watching for sure.TND: You’re a small player. How have you had to adapt to the KIJHL?A.W: This is a tough league to play in and there are a lot of guys out there who are just trying to take your head off.  So you’ve just got to keep your head up  . . .. As long as you have your head up you should be fine. You can’t be scared, that’s for sure if you’re a small guy. You’ve got to be tough and be willing to go into the corners.TND: Is that your biggest adjustment your size?A.W.: This is a pretty fast league and there are guys, who are a lot stronger than me so I need to use my quickness and move out on the ice and be smart.TND: Where do you hope to be next year?A.W.: I don’t know where I’ll be, if it’s back in Nelson, but I’m definitely going to be playing hockey somewhere.TND: Where do you hope to be in five years?A.W.: In five years I want to own a business. I’m going to SAIT (Southern Institute of Technology) in Calgary and take business and hopefully I can own my own business.TND: In 10 years?A.W: Hopefully I’m retired. He may be a rookie but at 5’8″, 150 pounds Calgary native Alec Wilkinson is playing like a season veteran for the Green and White.Wilkinson, one of the Leafs “super pests”, is having a very fine first Kootenay International Junior Hockey League seaso, tied for third on team scoring with another pest, Carsen Willans.Wilkinson is back in the lineup, and will be needed as Nelson is currently in a battle for top spot in the Murdoch Division with the Beaver Valley Nitehawks.Nelson faces two Murdoch opponents this weekend at the NDCC Arena as Castlegar Rebels and Grand Forks Border Bruins come to town Friday and Saturday, respectively.The Nelson Daily.com, in conjunction with Nelson Home Building Centre present a closer look at Wilkinson in the latest Leafs Player Profile of the Week.Nelson Home Building Centre Leafs Player Profile of the Week.Alec WilkinsonAge: 18Born: Calgary, AltaHeight: 5’8”Weight: 150 poundsLeafs Stats: 36 games, 16 goals, 31 assists, 47 pointsYears in Hockey: 12Hometown: Calgary, AltaFavorite NHL Player: Sydney Crosby, Pittsburgh PenguinsFavorite NHL Team: Pittsburgh PenguinsFavorite Music: RapPre-Game Meal: Grilled Cheese SandwichBiggest accomplishment in hockey: Finishing second at the Western Canada Bantam AAA Finals, losing in overtime to WinnipegWork: Pacific InsightNickname: WilkeyOther interests: Snowboarding and Golflast_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – SATURDAY APRIL 2, 2016

first_imgRafael Bejarano29568583223%54%$3,210,966 Tiago Pereira119712106%24%$501,878 David Lopez17424152214%35%$753,801 Edwin Maldonado19441192021%41%$1,322,460 Santiago Gonzalez26947343317%42%$1,898,601 Joseph Talamo24631272913%35%$2,056,423 Fernando Perez17919202311%35%$965,852 Gary Stevens6412111019%52%$1,595,898 SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Kristin Mulhall52118321%42%$408,990 Doug O’Neill18730282616%45%$1,494,192 Drayden Van Dyke16917172610%36%$1,048,147 Kent Desormeaux13220252315%52%$1,643,269 Steven Miyadi7313141018%51%$405,782 Mario Gutierrez17621312412%43%$1,267,069 Agapito Delgadillo9914111014%35%$390,362 (Current Through Friday, April 1) ‘CANDY’ SWEET IN FINAL SANTA ANITA DERBY DRILLLONE PICK SIX WINNER REAPS $52,823 ON $32 TICKETCHAMPION STELLAR WIND WORKS FOR HER RETURNBALDWIN AVE. TRAFFIC TO BE DIVERTED SATURDAY JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Abel Lezcano817559%21%$539,769 Martin Pedroza1101413713%31%$398,690center_img DANZING CANDY IN ‘PERFECT’ BREEZE FOR SA DERBYSeveral of the West Coast’s leading Triple Crown aspirants got in their final major licks on a summer-like morning today for next Saturday’s Grade I, $1 million Santa Anita Derby, which has produced the winner of the Kentucky Derby two of the last four years, I’ll Have Another (2012) and California Chrome (2014).San Felipe Stakes winner Danzing Candy worked five furlongs under regular rider Mike Smith in company outside of Miraglo. Each was clocked in 1:00.60.“Perfect,” is how trainer Cliff Sise Jr. termed the move by the speedy Danzing Candy. “Even though it looks like a small field for the Santa Anita Derby, post positions will be important, especially with the speed in there now.“We don’t have to be in front, but I’ll pretty much leave it up to Mike. I’m sure if the other speed (Iron Rob, coming off a front-running win in the six furlong San Pedro Stakes March 20) knows that if I draw inside, I’m going to go, and he’ll sit off of us.“If he draws inside of me, it will be vice-versa.”Santa Anita clockers gave Danzing Candy fractional times of 24, 36.40 and 48.40, with a gallop out time of 1:14 for six furlongs.Exaggerator, second to unbeaten champion Nyquist in the Feb. 15 San Vicente and third behind Danzing Candy in the March 12 San Felipe, worked five furlongs for Keith Desormeaux with brother Kent aboard in 1:02.80.Exaggerator’s fractions were 25 flat and 50.80.“It was a little slower than he’s used to going,” Keith said, “but Kent said he was well in hand and galloped out strong.”Also working for the Santa Anita Derby were Iron Rob, six furlongs in 1:14.40 for George Papaprodromou; California-bred Smokey Image, six furlongs in 1:13.40 for Carla Gaines; and Uncle Lino, five furlongs in 1:02.40 for Gary Sherlock.Smokey Image had splits of 13.40, 36.60 and 48.80. Uncle Lino went a half in 50.40. BALDWIN AVE. CLOSED MORNING OF SANTA ANITA DERBYThose wishing to spend the morning at Santa Anita’s Clockers’ Corner on Santa Anita Derby Day next Saturday, April 9, are advised that Baldwin Ave. will be closed to vehicular traffic between the 210 Freeway and Huntington Drive from 7:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. in order to accommodate foot traffic related to Santa Anita’s annual Derby Day 5K Run and Walk.Accordingly, Santa Anita’s Gate 8, which adjoins the Westfield Shopping Mall on Baldwin Ave., and Gate 7, at the track’s northwest end, will also be closed to vehicles during the same time frame.Those wishing to visit Clockers’ Corner on Derby Day morning will be able to enter the track on Santa Anita’s northeast perimeter, through Gate 5, or on the track’s southern perimeter, through Gate 3. Gates 3 and 5 will be open for easy access to Clockers’ Corner beginning at 5 a.m. and will remain open throughout the day. Santa Anita’s main track will be closed for training at 7:30 a.m.Gate 3 is located at the intersection of Holly Ave. and Huntington Drive. Gate 5 is located at the confluence of Colorado Place and Huntington Drive.For additional information on the Grade I, $1 million Santa Anita Derby and on the Derby Day 5K Run and Walk, fans are encouraged to visit santaanita.com/events, or call (626) 574-RACE.FINISH LINES: Stellar Wind, champion Older Female of 2015, had her first work since running second in the Breeders’ Cup Distaff last Oct. 30, going three furlongs Saturday for John Sadler in 37.40. “Very nice,” is how the trainer termed the move. Stellar Wind went the first quarter-mile in 25.20. Also working for Sadler was Santa Anita Handicap runner-up Hard Aces, four furlongs in 48.20, while Palos Verdes and San Carlos winner Kobe’s Back went four furlongs in 49.20 for Peter Eurton . . . Nyquist arch-rival Swipe worked six furlongs for Keith Desormeaux in 1:13 flat. The trainer has the Grade I, $500,000 Gold Cup at Santa Anita on June 25 as a long-range goal for 2014 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner Texas Red . . . Arcadia Stakes winner Bolo worked four furlongs for Carla Gaines in 48 flat, while La Canada winner Taris went the same distance in 49 flat for Simon Callaghan . . . San Pedro runner-up Denman’s Call worked a mile for Doug O’Neill in 1:43.20 . . . With two wins Friday, Phil D’Amato has opened a 32-30 lead over O’Neill in the battle for Winter Meet training honors. The jockeys’ race is a fait accompli, with perennial leader Rafael Bejarano holding a commanding 68-47 bulge over injured and idle Santiago Gonzalez, but third-place Flavien Prat could take advantage of Gonzalez’s down time and move into second. He sits third with 43 victories. . . Effective today, agent Mark North has taken the book of Stewart Elliott, while apprentice Brayan Pena and agent Vic Lipton have parted company . . . UBER, the official ride to Santa Anita, will continue to offer 50 percent discounts to and from the track (up to $20) through July 10, 2016. The promo code is SANTAANITA2016. Santa Anita employees are welcome to use the discount code. Alonso Quinonez9471067%24%$334,590 Richard Baltas12121201517%46%$1,343,919 WINNING PICK SIX PAYS $52,823 ON $32 TICKETPurchased at Fairplex Park for just $32, there was one winning Santa Anita Pick Six ticket on Friday, and it was worth $52,823.One of just two “live” horses in an eighth race field of 10 fillies and mares, favored Be Mine quickly erased any notion of a Pick Six carryover into Saturday with an emphatic 5 ¼  length win under Flavien Prat at odds of 2-1.There were 70 tickets with five winners, each worth $327.20. Mark Glatt991012910%31%$497,150 Tyler Baze27528444010%41%$1,504,991 Bob Baffert10421181720%54%$1,600,045 Martin Garcia13521141516%37%$1,188,531 Philip D’Amato14232222423%55%$1,648,005 Mike Smith961191811%40%$1,649,530 Peter Eurton9415221216%52%$1,057,037 Victor Espinoza891211813%35%$906,350 Flavien Prat25743464317%51%$2,680,306 Jerry Hollendorfer14424141717%38%$1,708,823 John Sadler861310915%37%$836,244 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Peter Miller13516152112%39%$740,395 William Spawr42107424%50%$288,732last_img read more

Weekly Wrap-up: The Year the Check-in Died, Twitter Drops Ruby for Java, The Future of the Camera and More…

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 2011: The Year the Check-in DiedOnce Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for JavaFacebook is Great, But Does It Make Businesses Any Money?UX Evolutions: The Future of the CameraApple Hiring a Team to Build “the Future of Cloud Services”More coverage and analysis from ReadWriteWebGet Ready For The ReadWriteWeb 2WAY Summit: June 13-14 in New York City Join ReadWriteWeb for one of the top tech events of the summer. Day one of the summit will feature talks from some of the smartest folks in technology and media, including Fred Wilson, Gawker CEO Nick Denton, Jason Calacanis, danah boyd, Flipboard CEO Mike McCue, Chris Dixon, NPR’s Andy Carvin and more. Day two is all about learning and interaction, with breakout discussions and enriching workshops that cater to all levels of Web knowledge.Visit the event site now for more information and to buy your ticket.LocationWhat to Expect from Where 2.0 in 2011: Context, Crowdsourcing & ProximityCheck-ins Are Dead? Location App Life360 Adds 1 Million Users in 10 WeeksMore Location coverageMobile Tags:#web#Weekly Wrap-ups Using Windows Phone 7: One Week with an HD7HTC Dominating Online Chatter, Says Market Research FirmMore Mobile coverageInternet of ThingsMicrosoft Announces Kinect SDK: Why This is the Future of WindowsThe State of the Internet of Things – Is There Enough Commercial Activity?More Internet of Things coverageCheck Out The ReadWriteWeb iPhone App As well as enabling you to read ReadWriteWeb while on the go or lying on the couch, we’ve made it easy to share ReadWriteWeb posts directly from your iPhone, on Twitter and Facebook using the official ReadWriteWeb iPhone app. You can also follow the RWW team on Twitter, directly from the app. We invite you to download it now from iTunes.ReadWriteEnterpriseReadWriteEnterprise is devoted to enterprise 2.0 and using social software inside organizations. 5 Top Marketing Blogs by Entrepreneurs5 Tools to Improve Your Idea Before You Write a Line of Code4 Tips for Taking Your Startup InternationalReadWriteCloudReadWriteCloud is dedicated to virtualization and cloud computing. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Facebook is Great, But Does It Make Businesses Any Money?How to Manage Your Business’s Presence on BingiContact Offers Free Email Marketing Service for Small BusinessesReadWriteHackReadWriteHack is a resource and guide for developers. Once Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for JavaApple Hiring a Team to Build “the Future of Cloud Services”The Cloud Stratosphere [Infographic]ReadWriteBizReadWriteBiz is a resource and guide for small to medium businesses. All About “Mango:” New Version of Windows Phone Arriving this FalliPad to Dominate Tablet Market Until 2015Nokia Reveals Symbian Update, New Phones & Ovi Store NumbersEnjoy your weekend everyone!Subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-upYou can subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-up by RSS or by email below.RWW Weekly Wrap-up Email Subscription form:center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market ReadWrite Sponsors Related Posts Live Blog: Microsoft MIX 2011 Day 1 – Internet Explorer 10 Preview, and MoreMicrosoft MIXed Messages on Silverlight, Internet Explorer 10Live Blog: Microsoft MIX 2011 Day 2 – New Windows Phone 7 Features, Silverlight 5, Kinect SDKReadWriteMobileReadWriteMobile is dedicated to helping its community understand the strategic business and technical implications of developing mobile applications. Government Agrees With Microsoft: Google Wasn’t Certified [Update]Mixed Reviews for Blackberry’s Tablet, But Will It Be a Good Enterprise Device?IT Poll: Which NoSQL Company Will Be Acquired by a Major Player First?ReadWriteStartReadWriteStart is a resource for startups and entrepreneurs. One of our top posts this week was Richard MacManus’ look at the future of the camera. We all know how smartphones integrated cameras. “Could we be about to see the inverse – cameras integrating smartphone technology?” he asked. The story is part of our ongoing series looking at what it means to consume and produce media in post-PC-centric world.After the jump you’ll find more of this week’s top news stories on some of the key trends that are shaping the Web – mobile, location, Internet of Things – plus highlights from our six channels. Read on for more.Top Stories of the Week A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

How to Create Greater Value

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now If you want to move from transactional to consultative, here is where you start.Spend More Time in Discovery: Spend more time in discovery understanding your dream client’s real needs. You want to understand the needs that they know how to express, and you want to understand the real needs that they have not yet identified. You want to deal with the root cause, not the presenting problem. To create the most compelling, value creating opportunity, you need to work to understand what needs to change, why it needs to change, what that change needs to look like, and how you can help your dream client with their transformation. Most of the value you create as a salesperson happens early in the process.Go Deep and Wide: You can’t do real discovery work with a single contact in a complex sale. You need to meet with stakeholders throughout your dream client’s company. You need to work your way up to leadership to understand their strategic needs, and you need to work down to end users to capture their needs—and a lot of insight around the real obstacles you are likely to encounter. The consensus you need later is built on your having captured the organization’s needs—not just the CEO of the Problem.Be Bigger and Bolder: You need to present a differentiated, compelling level of value. You can’t sell what you believe is easy to sell (that makes you something less than a trusted advisor). You can’t sell what you believe is easy to sell, or what you believe you can sell fast. Both are transactional behaviors. You have to sell the greatest outcome you are capable of producing, even if it is a more difficult sale, and even if it takes more time.Don’t Sell Product: If you want to focus on value creation, then you can’t lead with product. The value you create cannot be in the product or service. It has to be greater than that. It has to be outcomes.Don’t Sell Price: If you lead with price, you aren’t selling the value you create. Price is the absence of value. Leading with price means you aren’t competing on the real value you create.Don’t Sell to Your Coach/Sponsor/Authority Alone: Selling greater value requires that you sell to the whole organization. Selling to only one person is transactional.The first three behaviors here allow you to create and develop compelling value. They move you from transactional to consultative. The last three behaviors subtract value and move you in the wrong direction.QuestionsHow do you create value early in the sales process?What do you do to create value in the discovery phase of the buying cycle?Where do you find your dream client’s real needs and real obstacles?Do you always present the best solution possible, even when it may cost you time?last_img read more

CCPA report calls for expansion of pension regulations

first_imgOTTAWA – A report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives recommends that payments to shareholders such as dividends and share buybacks by companies should be limited if their pension plans are underfunded.The report says pension regulations must expand to consider broader financial decisions within companies.It says that in many instances, firms are complying with the minimum required payments under the rules, but they are not making up the shortfalls in the pension plans as fast as they could.Companies with defined-benefit pension plans have been hurt by the financial crisis and low interest rates, which have increased the amount of money they are required to have in their pension plans to pay future benefits.When a pension plan is not fully funded, members face the possibility of seeing their pensions reduced if the plan is forced to wind up.The report noted that the pension plan at Sears Canada has a $267-million shortfall, but the retailer which is in the process of liquidating has paid $1.5 billion in shareholders in dividends and share buybacks since 2010.last_img read more

Womens soccer McVicker sees injury as stepping stone

Entering its game against Minnesota, the Ohio State women’s soccer team had high hopes for its season-opening run. Those high hopes were shattered on one serious play during the seventh minute, when redshirt senior goalkeeper Jillian McVicker tried to make a save.McVicker collided with a Minnesota player, and sustained fractured ribs, a punctured lung and a lacerated kidney. She was quickly removed from the field and taken to a Minnesota hospital,where she remained in intensive care for two days before being downgraded to standard care.“Ohio State senior goalkeeper Jillian McVicker is being held at a Minneapolis hospital through the end of the week for further treatment and testing after suffering an injury Sunday at Minnesota,” the athletic department said in a statement from an OSU spokesperson on Friday.McVicker has appeared in over 50 matches for the Buckeyes since joining the team in 2012. McVicker is a former assistant sports director for Lantern TV and also reported for The Lantern during the 2016 Spring Semester.After being released from the hospital on Saturday afternoon, she and her family drove back to Columbus, stopping in Chicago along the way before arriving back at OSU on Monday.Although not the first time the Metuchen, New Jersey, native has sustained an injury, this time, was different from the rest.OSU senior goaltender Jillian McVicker flexes as she recovers in her hospital bed in Minnesota. Credit: Courtesy of Jillian McVicker“I knew that it definitely wasn’t my muscle or anything. I just came out, I knew there was going to be a collision but I just had to get the ball,” McVicker said. “When I came out, I thought I had the wind knocked out of me at first, and then I couldn’t breathe for like a minute.”According to McVicker, her doctor said this type of injury is most common after being involved in a car crash, not with a sport like soccer.The injury has effectively ended the OSU career of McVicker, with a little over a month left in the regular season. Although her time as a Buckeye athlete has been cut short, she has still maintained a positive attitude and high spirits. “All the adversity I have faced, whether it be from injury or typical adversity that every athlete goes through, you just have to keep your head up and keep your mind on the process,” McVicker said. “Take it day-by-day and step-by-step. Which is actually very ironic because that’s exactly what I’m doing in my rehab right now.”As part of the healing process, McVicker can only lift things under 10 pounds, while limiting the amount of overall movement she has throughout the day.On social media, McVicker has received an outpouring of support from family, friends, teammates, players from other teams and, most notably, former United States Women’s National Team midfielder Julie Foudy. McVicker, a four-time OSU scholar-athlete and three-time Academic All-Big Ten selection, has appeared in over 60 matches during her career with the Buckeyes. She is a double major in strategic communications and journalism, and will be graduating this December.After graduation and her injuries have fully healed, McVicker has intentions to continue her playing career outside of OSU.“I definitely want to graduate and want to look at playing overseas in Germany professionally or in America,” McVicker said. “I’m going to probably try to get an agent and figure that out once I graduate. It’s definitely not the last time I’m going to put on my keeper gloves and my jersey again.”Although she will no longer be lacing up her cleats for the Scarlet and Gray, McVicker said she will be embracing her new role of cheering her team on. Without the redshirt senior in the net, the Buckeyes will now be looking to the sideline when when she returns. From here on out, the focus of McVicker is to rally the troops to continue the team’s success. “Although this injury happened to me, my main thing for this season is for my team to be successful,” McVicker said. “Yes, this is horrible and I wouldn’t wish this upon anyone. But at the same time, all of my energy and everything when I get back is to prepare my the team the best I can in my new role.” read more